Seaport Neighborhood - Infill and Discussion

Suffolk 83

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The fundamentals of air travel have really changed remarkably little in the last 50 years. For example, Boeing 737s and 747s were flying in 1969. They're still flying today, just updated versions of the same craft. Of all technologies, commercial air travel is one that has seen the fewest technological breakthroughs in the last half-century.

There's more software under the hood, but jets today fly just about the same as they did in the days of Apollo program. For example, modern commercial planes take-off and land pretty much identically to those of the past. There's little reason to believe any huge game-changing breakthrough is likely to come anywhere in the foreseeable future.
Fair point but looking at the past isnt always the best way to predict the future.
 

jass

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Outside of New York’s Hudson Yards, I wonder just how rare it is, in the 21st century, for an American city to have a neighborhood this new, this big. Amazingly good fortune for Boston.
Many western sprawl cities build new annexes larger than this on a Sunday

 

chrisbrat

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Many western sprawl cities build new annexes larger than this on a Sunday
when the question was asked about, "how rare it is, in the 21st century, for an American city to have a neighborhood this new, this big," i took that to be in reference to actual cities. madera, california is not a city.

if you could point to similar developments/annexation in san francisco or seattle, that'd maye support your point.

i think edmc does have a point -- you don't see chicago or philadelphia suddenly adding a whole new, quite large (in comparision to the rest of the city) neighborhood in the 21st century.
 

dshoost88

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when the question was asked about, "how rare it is, in the 21st century, for an American city to have a neighborhood this new, this big," i took that to be in reference to actual cities. madera, california is not a city.

if you could point to similar developments/annexation in san francisco or seattle, that'd maye support your point.

i think edmc does have a point -- you don't see chicago or philadelphia suddenly adding a whole new, quite large (in comparision to the rest of the city) neighborhood in the 21st century.
I've done a bit of traveling around the country the last decade and studied several cities. From the 21st century thus far, I think other American neighborhoods in cities that have seen a comparable level of urban development (if not more significant) include the following:

- LoDo in Denver, CO
- Hollywood & Vine, Los Angeles, CA
- Downtown Los Angeles, CA
- Downtown Santa Monica, CA
- Brickell in Miami, FL
- Downtown Miami, FL
- Flagler Village in Fort Lauderdale, FL
- Downtown/The Gulch, Nashville, TN
- South Loop/Prairie District, Chicago, IL
- Mission Bay, San Francisco, CA
- Tempe, AZ
- Tyson's Corner, VA
- Eisenhower, Alexandria, VA
- University City, Philadelphia, PA
- Literally all of Brooklyn, NY
- Arena District, Columbus, OH
- Downtown near US Bank Stadium, Minneapolis, MN
 

jass

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when the question was asked about, "how rare it is, in the 21st century, for an American city to have a neighborhood this new, this big," i took that to be in reference to actual cities. madera, california is not a city.

if you could point to similar developments/annexation in san francisco or seattle, that'd maye support your point.

i think edmc does have a point -- you don't see chicago or philadelphia suddenly adding a whole new, quite large (in comparision to the rest of the city) neighborhood in the 21st century.
I specifically said western sprawl cities.

Places like Dallas, Phoenix, and Las Vegas. Don't blink or you might miss Dallas adding another 100,000 residents.

You cant discount them as not being "real cities" because their urban form is horrendous.

The image posted above is an extension of Fresno, CA

Fresno Population: 530,093
Boston Population: 694,583

I'd expect Fresno to overtake Boston not too far in the future. The city has a 20% growth rate every decade.


San Francisco proper has Mission Bay which is incredibly similar to the seaport









No, you dont see Chicago adding stuff. Their population is either stable or declining.
 

fattony

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Schuylkill Yards in Philly - 14 acres and 7 million square feet right next to 30th street station (3rd busiest train station in the US). I don't know if that is quite big enough to call a "neighborhood," but along with other development in University City it is massive change to the area.
 

chrisbrat

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Schuylkill Yards in Philly - 14 acres and 7 million square feet right next to 30th street station (3rd busiest train station in the US). I don't know if that is quite big enough to call a "neighborhood," but along with other development in University City it is massive change to the area.
wikipedia (frequently wrong, i know) has 30th street as the 10th busiest in the u.s. has it gotten much bigger/busier lately?

edit -- 3rd biggest Amtrak station (South Station is 6th). Gotcha.
 

stick n move

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Mission bay is coming out great imo. They do need to extend the dense new development down further into the central waterfront though because demand is insanely high and rent is out of control. They could add a huge amount of housing going in this direction vs deeper inland ruining the character of established neighborhoods.
 
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mdd

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atlantaden

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Chicago, such a fabulous town, filled with architectural porn! The River Walk, a wow factor of 10! I read about all these projects along the river (thanks mdd) and thought....But what about the shadows on the river, the traffic, the overcrowded sidewalks and transit...etc. It's almost an automatic thing to even think about, but when one reads all the negatives that are thrown at almost every project in the Boston area, you can't help yourself. Just curious, do Chicagoans push back on these projects with the same vigor that would be found in Boston, or is their civic pride involved? I think more of the later. Don't get me wrong, development needs imput from neighbors, but frankly, even in areas that are perfect for development, projects get insane amounts of pushback.
 

stick n move

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The Nema Chicago is amazing! Fits with the broad shoulders theme for sure, plus squares off that end of the park even more. Theyre constructing multiple supertalls right now too with a couple more starting soon.
 

falcon42

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Sad to see multiple local businesses replaced by one skincare company...with Blue Mercury right across the street.
 

cjbski

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Sad to see multiple local businesses replaced by one skincare company...with Blue Mercury right across the street.
Not sad at all. This is a pop-up, and a unique one that is drawing TONS of people to the Seaport in droves since it opened.

All of the local business shops at the Current are pop-ups for a set period of time. This is the third round.

It's creating tons of energy that otherwise hasn't been there with the other shops, and I'm sure it's only for a month or two until the next batch comes in.

Finally, BlueMercury has 100+ locations. And Sephora is around the corner. This is probably good for both of them.
 

falcon42

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I meant as far as only having 1 tenant. This is the first time each space has not been filled by a LOCAL retailer. Now its 1 retailer taking up all 10 or so spaces.
 

whighlander

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I've done a bit of traveling around the country the last decade and studied several cities. From the 21st century thus far, I think other American neighborhoods in cities that have seen a comparable level of urban development (if not more significant) include the following:

- LoDo in Denver, CO
- Hollywood & Vine, Los Angeles, CA
- Downtown Los Angeles, CA
- Downtown Santa Monica, CA
- Brickell in Miami, FL
- Downtown Miami, FL
- Flagler Village in Fort Lauderdale, FL
- Downtown/The Gulch, Nashville, TN
- South Loop/Prairie District, Chicago, IL
- Mission Bay, San Francisco, CA
- Tempe, AZ
- Tyson's Corner, VA
- Eisenhower, Alexandria, VA
- University City, Philadelphia, PA
- Literally all of Brooklyn, NY
- Arena District, Columbus, OH
- Downtown near US Bank Stadium, Minneapolis, MN
Objection -- None of the western sprawls [pretending to be cities] count as all it takes are some stakes some fencing a sign and then you can start digging a foundation

The rest of the list is mostly fluff with only a couple of exceptions -- None of the high fluff factor cities can contribute anything of significance in comparison to the Seaport and soon Suffolk Downs -- all of whom of course are scions of Kendall
 

ceo

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Apropos of nothing, I want to know whose brilliant idea it was to put the PTC and PWC buildings right next to each other.
 

JeffDowntown

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Apropos of nothing, I want to know whose brilliant idea it was to put the PTC and PWC buildings right next to each other.
The owners of the letters "U" and "V". Now they have the market cornered.
 

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