The Alcott (née Garden Garage Towers) | 35 Lomasney Way | West End

odurandina

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2015
Messages
4,778
Reaction score
12
Sounds as much geosoil eng myth. But what are we talking? 450' or 950'?

In any case, so much of the UWS is at least reasonably tall and dense,

not to mention quite enough of Manhattan!
 

Czervik.Construction

Senior Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2013
Messages
1,263
Reaction score
5
That is partly true when thinking north/south below Central Park. For the most part, high rises stop below 40th street and don't pick up again until FiDi.

A lot of that has to do with soil, etc. However, there are 700 footers popping up in the NoMad area, so developers have found some pockets to build on.

The UWS has almost nothing in the 30+ floor variety. Lots of historic buildings, brownstones, etc plus a strong multi-generational neighborhood that is very NIMBY.

In the UES, there are some high rises, but they are on the outskirts, close to the East River. Most of the UES is a no-fly zone for tall buildings.

When looking at downtown, I lived in the West Village and there is no way anyone is building anything tall there or in Greenwich Village or Chelsea (unless it is West Chelsea near the High Line). Fierce opposition from neighborhood groups and zoning. It is NYC's version of the Back Bay / South End, etc.

If someone gets a 700+ footer like my building built in the West Village, I will eat my hat.

^I don't believe the first paragraph is completely true. (but perhaps not pertaining to Brooklyn) I remember reading somewhere that most of the tall Manhattan towers are concentrated centrally due to varying soil/bedrock conditions in certain areas of the city. (this prohibits taller towers in some areas)
 

curcuas

Active Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2015
Messages
281
Reaction score
3
^this is a myth^

NYC downzoned everywhere between midtown and the FiDi effectively by the time of the 1961 zoning code (the village was in the late 50s) and historic preservation did the rest. There are older buildings on Madison Square and sprinkled throughout that are taller that slipped through in various ways.

The entire history is well documented
 

atlantaden

Senior Member
Joined
May 31, 2006
Messages
2,021
Reaction score
1
Damn, that is one big-ass hole! And dude, I know some dudes can sleep about anywhere, but you are ridiculous!
 
Last edited:

datadyne007

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Sep 15, 2010
Messages
8,763
Reaction score
46
Edit: Apparently xF automatically parses and embeds FB posts...

Update from S&F Concrete:

There are some cool 360 pix in the pit on the FB album: https://www.facebook.com/SFConcrete/posts/10156450548951517
S&F Concrete Contractors,Inc
47 mins ·
Equity Garden Garage
Boston MA
We are waiting for the final 10k square feet of slab on grade, the P5 parking level, to be turned over to us. We’ve placed 1/2 of the P4 level. And, have begun the P3 level. Things are progressing nicely.
This is a very large site with many logistical restrictions. Yet, our team continues to push us further along and make us look good while they doing it.
We are pressing harder and harder to have the parking levels completed ahead of schedule, is possible. The result of this effort would be the tower starting that much sooner. That is our goal.
 

Lrfox

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2006
Messages
2,497
Reaction score
9
I assume that's a core starting to rise? Nice!

The enormity of this pit is really impressive.
 

BeeLine

Superstar
Joined
Jan 7, 2012
Messages
10,099
Reaction score
577
I assume that's a core starting to rise? Nice!

The enormity of this pit is really impressive.
A 800+ space parking garage needs a big pit.
Yes, the core, for the tower, has reached ground level.
 

Top