City Hall Plaza Revamp | Government Center

Bos77

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Why dont they ever plant evergreens??? Cant they grow in the city??
The root structures are not conducive to urban settings. Pine/evergreen tends to spread at the surface (so would lift/crack most hardscaped surfaces), as opposed to maple, oak, birch, locusts, etc., which tend to be more compact and roots grow down or can survive constricted environments.
 

Blackbird

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The root structures are not conducive to urban settings. Pine/evergreen tends to spread at the surface (so would lift/crack most hardscaped surfaces), as opposed to maple, oak, birch, locusts, etc., which tend to be more compact and roots grow down or can survive constricted environments.
Could they make all of City Hall Plaza hard-packed dirt to account for the roots or is that not ADA compliant?
 

Bos77

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Could they make all of City Hall Plaza hard-packed dirt to account for the roots or is that not ADA compliant?
It all comes down to cost/benefit. Anything is possible for the right price, but then factor in spread keeping healthy supportive soils, the root causing adverse wear and tear, human impacts like foot traffic on shallow roots (or dogs peeing on them constantly), weight of vegetation or potential impact on other infrastructure (tunnels roofs), any utility relocation or potential entanglement on pipes or wires, all for plants that ultimately don't have a high success rate of long term survival in urban environments. Conifers can be beautiful, but they generally won't thrive in the heart of the city.
 

mass88

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The root structures are not conducive to urban settings. Pine/evergreen tends to spread at the surface (so would lift/crack most hardscaped surfaces), as opposed to maple, oak, birch, locusts, etc., which tend to be more compact and roots grow down or can survive constricted environments.
What kinds of trees have they planted? Those look pretty large for being just planted.
 

Cortes

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While I would of preferred the extension of Hannover St., this is in my opinion a great change. (Whenever it gets finished.). The real clincher for me, though, will be the redevelopment of the low rise portion of the JFK building. If it offered 3 or 4 restaurants and a coffee shop with permanent outdoor seating, it would REALLY improve the entire experience. That blank wall is now the only thing truly f'ing the plaza up.
 
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jass

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The root structures are not conducive to urban settings. Pine/evergreen tends to spread at the surface (so would lift/crack most hardscaped surfaces), as opposed to maple, oak, birch, locusts, etc., which tend to be more compact and roots grow down or can survive constricted environments.
I dont buy this excuse. The west coast is filled with urban pine trees.

Edit: here are some urban California pine trees seen 40 years after they were planted and with a near zero budget for sidewalk/plaza maintenance.

Photos taken in January.

View attachment 26184

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Edit how do I get the pics to show up
 

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Charlie_mta

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I dont buy this excuse. The west coast is filled with urban pine trees.

Edit: here are some urban California pine trees seen 40 years after they were planted and with a near zero budget for sidewalk/plaza maintenance.

Photos taken in January.

View attachment 26184

View attachment 26185

View attachment 26186

Edit how do I get the pics to show up
Pine tress are not prevalent in Massachusetts, but deciduous trees are. Whatever they do with CH Plaza, it should reflect the look of the Boston area. Pine tress look great in California, but IMO would look out of place in Boston.
 

jass

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Pine tress are not prevalent in Massachusetts, but deciduous trees are. Whatever they do with CH Plaza, it should reflect the look of the Boston area. Pine tress look great in California, but IMO would look out of place in Boston.
Wut.

Im sorry, but WHAT.

Massachusetts's forests are covered by five major forest types: northern hardwoods, oak/hickory, white and red pine, mixed oak/white pine, and elm/ash/red maple.



With approximately 82 species discovered in these forests, the Eastern White Pine and Red Maple are the most abundant in terms of total volume and number of trees, respectively.

Drop a pin into any random road in MA and youll see one.


Are you confusing the fact that most of them were cut down?

Eastern white pine forests originally covered much of north-central and northeastern North America. Only 1% of the old-growth forests remain after the extensive logging operations from the 18th century to early 20th century.
 

HenryAlan

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Based on the pie chart, it's about 21% pine, so definitely not the main tree type. In the city of Boston, most of the pine trees I know about are in specific and often specialized locations, such as the conifer path in the Arboretum. Aside from those groomed/curated areas, I don't think you'll find many pines around here, though obviously there are some spread about the state, just not as the dominant form.
 

Bos77

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I dont buy this excuse. The west coast is filled with urban pine trees.
Just because a certain type of tree can survive in California or Washington doesn't mean there's similar option that works for Boston's climate or the site constraints. As always it can come down to cost/benefit, programming decisions, and what has historically had the best chance of surviving. Pine root will 100% cause damage in time - whether you can see it at the surface or to the tunnel roofs, utilities, etc., below.
 

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