General MBTA Discussion Thread

The EGE

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It took me a moment to recognize that as Park Street. Amazing what proper lighting does.
 

whighlander

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Every time my train has entered Park Street for the last two weeks I've felt a big change. I know what they've done, but it's not obvious. It just feels better.
Equilibria -- I think the T has hit "Rock Bottom" and is beginning the long climb out

We have been bloodied if not defeated by the Blizzards, By the Derailments, By the Crash into the "Huts" and by numerous fires, smoke, dead-trains, etc.

Now -- we are starting to see progress -- new equipment, new & rebuilt stations

As Winston Churchill said after the victory over Rommel @ El Alamein in 1942 [after 3 years of war against the Nazis] -- to the effect of -- "Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. but it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning" *1

*1 "The End of the Beginning" speech sourced from the Churchill Society
The Lord Mayor's Luncheon, Mansion House
November 10, 1942

After a series of defeats from Dunkirk to Singapore, Churchill could finally tell the House of Commons that "we have a new experience. We have victory - a remarkable and definite victory.

"Alexander and Montgomery turned back Rommel's forces at El Alamein, thus winning what Churchill called "The Battle of Egypt." I have never promised anything but blood, tears, toil, and sweat. Now, however,The bright gleam has caught the helmets of our soldiers, and warmed and cheered all our hearts.

The late M. Venizelos observed that in all her wars England -- he should have said Britain, of course -- always wins one battle -- the last. It would seem to have begun rather earlier this time. General Alexander, with his brilliant comrade and lieutenant, General Montgomery, has gained a glorious and decisive victory in what I think should be called the battle of Egypt. Rommel's army has been defeated. It has been routed. It has been very largely destroyed as a fighting force....

Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. but it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning
 

HenryAlan

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Does anyone remember this headhouse? I believe that it was at Chinatown (then Essex) and built around 1972, but I'm not sure which corner.View attachment 1058
If you are correct about the Chinatown location (and I think you are), then I do remember it, though the building had been torn down. I never noticed it disappearing, but I think it ultimately became this:

 

HelloBostonHi

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Screenshot_20191104-131340_Chrome.jpg
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Only two interesting items from today's board meeting thus far, second headhouse at Forest Hills finally opens this week after sitting dormant and finished for 6 months awaiting "inspections"

And next weekends orange line diversion is "supersized", will have full bus shuttles from Ruggles through to Sullivan Square to allow for track access at the entrance near Sullivan Square and the entrance b/t Mass Ave and Ruggles.
 

The EGE

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If you are correct about the Chinatown location (and I think you are), then I do remember it, though the building had been torn down. I never noticed it disappearing, but I think it ultimately became this:

Thank you!! That's very helpful. Trying to figure out which Essex/Chinatown renovation was when - and when the Hayward and Lagrange entrances closed - is very confusing.
 

Massachoicetts

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not sure if this is the right place for this, but it would seem that despite the many (and legit) complaints, the T ain't so bad.
It is, and yeah living in Orlando, New York City and Syracuse have taught me how to appreciate the T.

The T has its issues, but its on time rating is significantly better than all but two systems...
 

chrisbrat

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i'll bite: what are the two systems you refer to? i assume you mean domestic, but going beyond the U.S. i've consistently been impressed by/with the subway systems in frankfurt, shanghai, and london. i know some disagree, but i'm with you that the mta in new york city sucks donkey balls. also a favorite for some, but i think san fran is garbage, too.
 

HenryAlan

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The MBTA is definitely one of the best systems in the US. I've extensively used transit in L.A., San Francisco, DC, and New York. All are pretty good, but only New York is comparable with Boston for overall coverage of the urban area.
 

Lrfox

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^"Corruption" gets tossed around too easily these days. That's bad, unacceptable behavior. Probably indicative of a larger, more personal issue and it's a good thing he resigned. But it's not corrupt.

On a completely unrelated note, does anyone know what causes a train to overrun the platform? Is it purely operator error, or it it mechanical malfunction? Or maybe some combination of both? I've been on a handful of trains that have overrun the platform and had to back up which is a slow process and causes delays. Most recently, it happened Wednesday at Porter. No announcement, no nothing. Just a pause, then a huffy operator storming out of the cockpit, walking back a few cars, getting off on the platform, eventually moving the train back, then returning to the front and resuming operations as usual. All told about 5 minutes or so of a delay (not major, but not great). I assume operator error since the train wasn't taken out of service. And since it's never been taken out of service when it's happened in the past, I'm assuming it's generally operator error, but I'm curious.
 

Rover

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Venturing well outside of the infrastructure part of the T but I think this just goes to show the organization isn't corruption free just yet.

This is 100% of the reason why people won't sign on for gas tax hikes, congestion pricing, or anything else until the entire MBTA is overhauled. Does anybody really think this guy is a one off issue? Or is he indicative of the entire organization - unaccountable, overpaid, and politically connected.

Put the MBTA through an orderly bankruptcy and clean it up from the debt to the pensions to the useless employees and start putting those $$$ towards system improvements. If any of us took 3 hour lunches and came back with booze on our breath regularly over 2 weeks time we'd be fired immediately. This is the kind of behavior that drives people nuts.
 

HenryAlan

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Somebody who drinks at work is indicative that alcoholism is a problem in this society. It is by no means something restricted to MBTA employees nor is it the fault of the MBTA that they hired a closet alcoholic. Why should we take this as an indication that highways need to be subsidized by general operating funds? The two things are completely unrelated.
 

Brad Plaid

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...Or is he indicative of the entire organization - unaccountable, overpaid, and politically connected.
Imagine if the MBTA rock was fully lifted the kinds of crawlies that would be exposed and running like hell for the nearest cover. Don't like to be this cynical but there is a mountain of justification for it. No government agency can be or ever will be completely free of dysfunctional behavior but passively accepting it or shrugging it off as hopeless to fix will of course only allow it to spread further and further, just like mold. Swamp creatures are very opportunistic.
 

George_Apley

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Imagine if the MBTA rock was fully lifted the kinds of crawlies that would be exposed and running like hell for the nearest cover. Don't like to be this cynical but there is a mountain of justification for it. No government agency can be or ever will be completely free of dysfunctional behavior but passively accepting it or shrugging it off as hopeless to fix will of course only allow it to spread further and further, just like mold. Swamp creatures are very opportunistic.
No human organization is. It isn't unique to government. I could sub out "MBTA" in your post for literally any company, organization, or government agency. I'm not really loving this "an alcoholic drinking during the day is proof that the MBTA is trash." An alcoholic executive isn't indicative of an institutional problem at the T, it's indicative of a dude with a problem. Jesus Christ.

Of course the T has problems, but this is a really really fucked up take.
 

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