Milton infill and small development

Once again wishing I could pay for single-access to the globe rather than a subscription. :(

You used to be able to buy a paper at a newsstand or convenience store without agreeing to have it delivered to your house daily.
 
and the Planning Board in a meeting late last week said they would draft a plan to comply only if the town’s requirements under the law were lessened.

What exactly does the planning board think its leverage here is? Why would the state acquiesce to this?
 
Here are the interesting bits from the lawsuit. This is what the AG is asking for. The AG is asking the court to say Milton is not in compliance. Three months to fix that. If Milton doesn't fix it, then the AG wants Milton to not be able to enforce any offending zoning laws. Also suggesting the court appointing a Special Master to propose a new zoning plan. Also suggests fining Milton until they comply.

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Special master for zoning you say? I want an air rights hi rises over the Milton station and tracks around the intersection, with the station moved under the bridge and head houses on all corners of the newly created square with full density build out and ground floor retail then. Thanks, Milton.
 
Here are the interesting bits from the lawsuit. This is what the AG is asking for. The AG is asking the court to say Milton is not in compliance. Three months to fix that. If Milton doesn't fix it, then the AG wants Milton to not be able to enforce any offending zoning laws. Also suggesting the court appointing a Special Master to propose a new zoning plan. Also suggests fining Milton until they comply.

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Worth noting the end of this list is "and" joined, meaning the state is requesting all of the above, A-G (with F being conditional on noncompliance under E). I'm very much reading F as a builder's remedy...

Anyone want to go in on a 0.6 acre lot and sell it to the highest bidder for a thousand-unit high-rise? Under a million bucks.

 
Worth noting the end of this list is "and" joined, meaning the state is requesting all of the above, A-G (with F being conditional on noncompliance under E). I'm very much reading F as a builder's remedy...

Anyone want to go in on a 0.6 acre lot and sell it to the highest bidder for a thousand-unit high-rise? Under a million bucks.


Serious question, not being a land use lawyer, if/when Milton eventually came into compliance, would they be able to halt construction of any projects that were started during the stay of their ability to enforce the zoning code? Or does that just become a pre-existing nonconforming parcel? Who would a prospective builder even seek a building permit from?

Edit: spelling
 
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Seriously question, not being a land use lawyer, if/when Milton eventually came into compliance, would they be able to halt construction of any projects that were started during the stay of their ability to enforce the zoning code? Or does that just become a pre-existing nonconforming parcel? Who would a prospective builder even seek a building permit from?

Interesting question. I think the correct avenue would be for a developer to apply for a building permit that would otherwise comply with the MBTA Communities Act. When Milton's building inspector and/or planning board denies the permit for not complying with Milton's zoning code, I would challenge that denial as a violation of M.G.L. c. 40A and unenforceable. It would be risky to start building during a stay, but nothing is stopping people from moving forward with the permitting process. Maybe you get lucky and get a judge to order Milton to comply or find that without valid zoning, the permit is de-facto approved.
 
Once again wishing I could pay for single-access to the globe rather than a subscription. :(

You used to be able to buy a paper at a newsstand or convenience store without agreeing to have it delivered to your house daily.

You’re welcome 😇
 
A new letter (that I have seen) where Milton is arguing that it is an MBTA community, but not a Rapid transit community:


Things seems like a pretty weak argument.
 
Trying to understand this issue - hadn't seen a map. Looks like they tanked the assignment intentionally by rezoning far away from where it should have been, and literally avoided the near-transit neighborhoods voting for increased density. Although - East Milton Square looks like a pretty good candidate for a nice TOD center for busses jumping on the highway.
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A new letter (that I have seen) where Milton is arguing that it is an MBTA community, but not a Rapid transit community:


Things seems like a pretty weak argument.
Yeah, it seems entirely pedantic 🙄
It is clear beyond peradventure that the Mattapan Trolley Line is not part of the MBTA Red Line, Green Line, Orange Line, or Blue Line. For example, MBTA’s Service Delivery Policy, upon which the MBTA’s classifications
are based, includes in its rapid transit designation five separate Lines, which are
comprised of heavy rail (Blue, Orange, and Red Lines) and light rail (Green Line and Mattapan Trolley Line).
 
Trying to understand this issue - hadn't seen a map. Looks like they tanked the assignment intentionally by rezoning far away from where it should have been, and literally avoided the near-transit neighborhoods voting for increased density. Although - East Milton Square looks like a pretty good candidate for a nice TOD center for busses jumping on the highway.
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Agreed that the plan as proposed sucked. Say what you will about the Newton plan, but it centered the units right on the stations.

That wasn't the argument made against it, though, so I'm not letting Milton off the hook.
 
Trying to understand this issue - hadn't seen a map. Looks like they tanked the assignment intentionally by rezoning far away from where it should have been, and literally avoided the near-transit neighborhoods voting for increased density. Although - East Milton Square looks like a pretty good candidate for a nice TOD center for busses jumping on the highway.

I'd almost agree, except those busses would be jumping on 93, and thus be useless in that parking lot of a highway.

Not really a great way to add transit there. Granite Ave would be great for a dedicated BRT row, but it has nowhere to go once you get to the bridge, it's right into a bottleneck and massive traffic from there till any subway transfer.

I always think the "Railway Village" Historic District is pretty amusing. One of the first in the country - not even a remote chance of rail returning.
 
Once again wishing I could pay for single-access to the globe rather than a subscription. :(

You used to be able to buy a paper at a newsstand or convenience store without agreeing to have it delivered to your house daily.

With a Boston Public Library e-card, there is a way to get access to the Boston Globe for free. Each time, access is limited to 3 days or something.
 
Once again wishing I could pay for single-access to the globe rather than a subscription. :(

You used to be able to buy a paper at a newsstand or convenience store without agreeing to have it delivered to your house daily.
Always worth plugging the URL into www.archive.today: https://archive.is/k3Co1

Also, interesting to see how some other towns are 'complying' against the spirit of the law: https://www.townofchelmsford.us/DocumentCenter/View/17174/MBTA-Zoning-FAQs-DRAFT3?bidId=
 
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Always worth plugging the URL into www.archive.today: https://archive.is/k3Co1

Also, interesting to see how some other towns are 'complying' against the spirit of the law: https://www.townofchelmsford.us/DocumentCenter/View/17174/MBTA-Zoning-FAQs-DRAFT3?bidId=

Again speaking to how silly it is that Milton is taking this approach, so many towns have just recognized how easy it is to just "comply" with the law while making sure very, very little is able to be built.

If only Milton had a large regional bus depot in the middle of construction they could zone for hundreds of units like Quincy did.
 

Interesting development - they are at least nominally trying to recover by saying they'll come up with 2 plans, one for adjacent and one for the current rapid transit community.

"The law and the accompanying guidelines describe a rapid transit community as a community that “has within its borders at least 100 acres of developable station area associated with one or more subway stations, or MBTA Silver Line bus rapid transit stations.” State officials have ruled that the Mattapan Trolley that runs along the border between Milton and Boston qualifies the town as a rapid transit community.

Town leaders, however, argue that Milton is an adjacent community under the law, meaning it “has within its boundaries less than 100 acres of developable station area.”


I don't know the schedule, but doesn't this become a moot issue when PCC trolleys on the Mattapan line (130 passengers) are replaced by the Type 9 trains (212 passengers — 61% more)? I don't see any planned schedule for the big effort to raise platforms and replace track, but still within the next 10 years, right?
 
I don't know the schedule, but doesn't this become a moot issue when PCC trolleys on the Mattapan line (130 passengers) are replaced by the Type 9 trains (212 passengers — 61% more)? I don't see any planned schedule for the big effort to raise platforms and replace track, but still within the next 10 years, right?
Damn, I've never once ridden on the Mattapan high speed line. Better get to it.
 

440 Granite Avenue​


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Oranmore Enterprises LLC, Breno Construction Company
Milton, Massachusetts

“Finegold Alexander is working with Oranmore Enterprises on a ground up, 24-unit mixed-use project in Milton, Massachusetts. The unusual triangular site of 440 Granite Avenue was formerly made up of a series of smaller, disjointed buildings and properties. Located near East Milton Square and along the Southeast Expressway, this cohesive residential development will serve as an important gateway to the Town. The building will contribute to Milton’s Housing Product Plan by promoting home ownership, providing 10% of affordable units and appealing to empty nesters and young couples.
The all-electric design for 440 Granite Avenue takes a robust approach to sustainability. The property boasts rooftop-mounted photovoltaics; electric vehicle charging stations; a high-performing, highly insulated thermal envelope; sustainable materials with recycled content; and a green roof on the 2nd level to reduce heat island effect and absorb stormwater runoff. To complete the package, bicycle storage facilities islocated on the basement level.”

Size
62,126
Scope
New Construction
Program
24 residential units, 1 commercial space, 40 interior parking spaces, 48 bicycle spots

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https://www.faainc.com/project/440-granite-avenue
 

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