North Washington St Bridge

erom

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Yeah, I've designed a weld that wasn't actually possible to manufacture as well. In my case, the shop just substituted a thinner piece of metal without telling me because the thickness I specified wouldn't weld. It actually failed in the field and broke a very nice piece of test equipment owned by the US Navy. Would have been the end of my career probably if I didn't have a paper trail proving it was the manufacturing team's fuckup. Still taught me an important lesson in the importance of inspection and verification.
 

bigpicture7

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In construction contracts, it's not uncommon to use the term "engineer" or "designer" to designate the design firm.
Peace to that. Yet here we have a bridge that is as much art as it is engineering. I meant my comment tongue-in-cheek for this particular case (hence my reference to their branding on their website).
 

AmericanFolkLegend

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A tiny nitpick: by "the engineer" you mean the bridge design firm ("bridges as structural art," per their own branding). It was very unlikely a single structural engineer made this design choice to put form over function, though I'm sure one or more was tasked with figuring out how to make the design work after it was aesthetically conceptualized (and ultimately someone signed off on it).
That's a fair distinction. I'm sure Rosales isn't the EOR (didn't stamp any of the drawings). I think I remember Benesch being the structural engineer and GZA being involved with the foundation design. There were like 6 stamps on the construction drawings if I recall correctly. So Rosales probably prescribed the individual piers and then it fell to Benesch to make that work and still meet seismic loads.
 

intellirock617

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That's a fair distinction. I'm sure Rosales isn't the EOR (didn't stamp any of the drawings). I think I remember Benesch being the structural engineer and GZA being involved with the foundation design. There were like 6 stamps on the construction drawings if I recall correctly. So Rosales probably prescribed the individual piers and then it fell to Benesch to make that work and still meet seismic loads.
The design was joint Rosales and Benesch. Someone from Benesch is the EOR I'm pretty sure. The piers were prescribed to create an inverse of the Zakim bridge as noted previously. The design is certainly unconventional and challenging which has led to many frustrations throughout construction.
RE: Your previous comments regarding the diaphragms ... there are several full depth/full height pieces spaced throughout.
 

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