Ollie | 217 Albany St | South End

odurandina

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Do the micro-sized studios share common kitchens with other units?
How many bathrooms to ever 2, 3 micro-sized units?
 

whighlander

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Takes all kinds: -- here's a small sample of places outside of hotel rooms or traditional apartments or single family houses in which I've stayed over the years:
  • At MIT as an undergrad I lived in MacGregor -- everyone had a room 5 rooms to a Suite shared kitchen, bathroom and small lounge -- 2 suites to a floor -- then as you scaled-up more common spaces --seemed to work quite well
  • As a grad student U Texas Austin my first habitation was a private dorm -- everyone had a room -- 2 rooms shared a bathroom -- no kitchen nothing much beyond a common entry lobby
  • On my way to Austin I stayed one night in Oak Ridge Tennessee next to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a WWII era Men's Dormitory -- 3 or for beds to a room, bathroom for a couple of such rooms a shower down the end of the hall, no kitchens or common areas
  • On a project in Singapore I stayed in complex on a private island that once was R&E for the British Army "Brass"-- grouped in clusters 3 rooms each with bath and kitchen with a 4th room for your semi-private valet on call 24x7
  • On a project in India I stayed in a complex once only available to British Officers located on a mountain in southern Andra Pradesh -- but it was more like a camp in the woods than a fancy hotel -- everyone had a room and a bathroom -- there was a communal mess hall down the road a piece
  • In Budapest I stayed in a Professors Guest House with a chef to cook breakfast to order for each floor -- 5 or 6 rooms
  • in Gdansk Poland I stayed in a "vising staff dormitory" where everyone had a room with a bathroom and there was a common breakfast room a and a common laundry
I guess I would consider most of the above with the exception of the Oak Ridge and Austin dorms as acceptable habitation
 

wilkee

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Here is a great primer on what is being done with a lot of micro apartments around the country:

This may not be exactly what we are getting here, but I imagine the concept is close.
 

Massachoicetts

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Takes all kinds: -- here's a small sample of places outside of hotel rooms or traditional apartments or single family houses in which I've stayed over the years:
  • At MIT as an undergrad I lived in MacGregor -- everyone had a room 5 rooms to a Suite shared kitchen, bathroom and small lounge -- 2 suites to a floor -- then as you scaled-up more common spaces --seemed to work quite well
  • As a grad student U Texas Austin my first habitation was a private dorm -- everyone had a room -- 2 rooms shared a bathroom -- no kitchen nothing much beyond a common entry lobby
  • On my way to Austin I stayed one night in Oak Ridge Tennessee next to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a WWII era Men's Dormitory -- 3 or for beds to a room, bathroom for a couple of such rooms a shower down the end of the hall, no kitchens or common areas
  • On a project in Singapore I stayed in complex on a private island that once was R&E for the British Army "Brass"-- grouped in clusters 3 rooms each with bath and kitchen with a 4th room for your semi-private valet on call 24x7
  • On a project in India I stayed in a complex once only available to British Officers located on a mountain in southern Andra Pradesh -- but it was more like a camp in the woods than a fancy hotel -- everyone had a room and a bathroom -- there was a communal mess hall down the road a piece
  • In Budapest I stayed in a Professors Guest House with a chef to cook breakfast to order for each floor -- 5 or 6 rooms
  • in Gdansk Poland I stayed in a "vising staff dormitory" where everyone had a room with a bathroom and there was a common breakfast room a and a common laundry
I guess I would consider most of the above with the exception of the Oak Ridge and Austin dorms as acceptable habitation
Wow MIT sounds luxurious. In NY, the state schools upstate provide dorms with 36 rooms (72-84 residents) sharing two bathrooms per gender with 4 stalls and 2 showers each. Asbestos in the walls, and everything concrete. 9 of 11 buildings like that. Other two? Similar but more spacious. Population of the town? 18,000 with a density of 500psqm.

But back on topic, I think these units are just fine. They serve a person nowadays and its what millennial want/need. Just like 100 years ago, triple deckers served an extraordinary purpose to house European migrants.
 

whighlander

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Wow MIT sounds luxurious. In NY, the state schools upstate provide dorms with 36 rooms (72-84 residents) sharing two bathrooms per gender with 4 stalls and 2 showers each. Asbestos in the walls, and everything concrete. 9 of 11 buildings like that. Other two? Similar but more spacious. Population of the town? 18,000 with a density of 500psqm.

But back on topic, I think these units are just fine. They serve a person nowadays and its what millennial want/need. Just like 100 years ago, triple deckers served an extraordinary purpose to house European migrants.
Not -- to continue the diversion too too much -- BUT -- not all MIT dorms had the same kinds of accommodations -- for instance in the architecturally significant Baker House designed by the Finnish Modernist Alvar Aalto -- there were the infamous Quads [stuffing 4 students into one room] which in my era looked across the Briggs Athletic Field at a blazing Neon Sign that said {"Cains Mayonnaise / Potato chips"] routinely hacked to say "Cains Mayonaise / Pot"]
 

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