🔹 What's Happening With Project X?

Suffolk 83

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That would be a sad end to a significant part of New Boston
I don't think anyone under the age of 50 knows or cares about that building, sorry to be rude but I think its true. Times change and it has one architecturally interesting feature that they want to get rid of anyway. Might as well blow up the whole thing
 

Scott

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That's your opinion for what it's worth. The actual reality is nobody but the our domestic height fetishists are calling for it to be torn down.
 

393b40

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That's your opinion for what it's worth. The actual reality is nobody but the our domestic height fetishists are calling for it to be torn down.
Woah woah. I'd tear that building down in a heart beat regardless of its successors height, its an awkward and uncomfortable building for its prominent location and the weird lobby treatment they were trying to give it wasn't going to fix the real problem with that building which is that street presence is bad.
 

Suffolk 83

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That's your opinion for what it's worth. The actual reality is nobody but the our domestic height fetishists are calling for it to be torn down.
But go above the 4th floor and there's nothing significant or even appealing to the building and as numbers guy mentioned, it has zero street interaction and gives nothing back to the area. Once they eliminate its one saving grace what's the point? You don't necessarily need to be a height fetishist to see its an underutilized plot in the heart of downtown.

I know its the 'lolipop' (or is it the pregnant building? Dont even care enough to know)from my parents who are now in their 70s. Time heals all wounds and it also brings change with it. It'll be alright
 

Scott

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The lolipops were a sculpture and this isn't the pregnant building. How wouldn't you know that? Are you even from here?
Also, it's rude to mention people's age. We are all young or old to someone. My teenage calls Millennials grampa.
 
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Suffolk 83

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I didnt understand the lolipop reference because I dont remember that sculpture and thought one could construe the building's shape as pregnant but yea now that you mention it thats 100 federal I guess. Again, it doesnt matter much as fewer and fewer people see the building as significant in any way which is my point.
 

DZH22

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.....You don't necessarily need to be a height fetishist to see its an underutilized plot in the heart of downtown.
There's a plot down the street 4 times the size of this, right next to the busiest train station in all of New England, that they plan to turn into a 190' lab (ie only about 65-85% as tall as the typical Kendall, Seaport, or Longwood lab). When we talk about underutilized plots in the heart of downtown, let's start by firmly opposing squat labs in the financial district!
 

Suffolk 83

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There's a plot down the street 4 times the size of this, right next to the busiest train station in all of New England, that they plan to turn into a 190' lab (ie only about 65-85% as tall as the typical Kendall, Seaport, or Longwood lab). When we talk about underutilized plots in the heart of downtown, let's start by firmly opposing squat labs in the financial district!
The black Fidelity building next to SS? Yea that also has got to go
 

DZH22

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The black Fidelity building next to SS? Yea that also has got to go
No that one is actually a much better use of space, as at least it's 14 stories and fully built-out. I'm talking about that garage next to 1 Lincoln. I can't remember the name of the thread but it's this one:

With a footprint like that, they could make 40% into a pocket park (or at the very least a lowrise portion with additional retail) and the other 60% into a 600' residential. Instead they're making a monolithic giant-wall lab building and once it's up that will be another blown parcel that won't be upgraded in any of our lifetimes. It's basically going to be like a North Point or New Balance (or Seaport/Fort Point!) type of building a block away from South Station. It's like, there's plenty of room to build the exact same building 50 times right across the canal. Instead they plan to underbuild on essentially the TODiest TOD site we have in a 6 state region.
 

Scott

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You may have a point so contact your local representative and speak to the people in your neighborhood and start a grass roots movement.
 

goldenretrievers

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Assembly Row parcels 7A, 7B, 9, Partners Phase 2?

1649710538723.png


Boston Landing parcels C2 Office and A2 Hotel? (besides LOI)

1649710722936.png
 

Suffolk 83

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No that one is actually a much better use of space, as at least it's 14 stories and fully built-out. I'm talking about that garage next to 1 Lincoln. I can't remember the name of the thread but it's this one:

With a footprint like that, they could make 40% into a pocket park (or at the very least a lowrise portion with additional retail) and the other 60% into a 600' residential. Instead they're making a monolithic giant-wall lab building and once it's up that will be another blown parcel that won't be upgraded in any of our lifetimes. It's basically going to be like a North Point or New Balance (or Seaport/Fort Point!) type of building a block away from South Station. It's like, there's plenty of room to build the exact same building 50 times right across the canal. Instead they plan to underbuild on essentially the TODiest TOD site we have in a 6 state region.
I dont disagree with you at all and I thought the same thing when the design came out.... I just dont see the point of saying the same thing over and over again. I've learned to accept the realities of the city and if you don't, I back up Scott's idea that you put your ideas into action instead of just repeating them here, over and over again.
 

DZH22

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I dont disagree with you at all and I thought the same thing when the design came out.... I just dont see the point of saying the same thing over and over again. I've learned to accept the realities of the city and if you don't, I back up Scott's idea that you put your ideas into action instead of just repeating them here, over and over again.
I have written letters to both the BPDA and Cambridge planning departments at different times, in support of different projects. I don't have a huge outlet as I'm not technically a resident, and some people think I shouldn't get to have any voice whatsoever. So part of what I rely on is relaying my ideas to people who do have that larger voice. Besides here, surrounded by mostly like-minded individuals, where else am I supposed to find those people?

I don't know what kind of voice you might have within the city. However, the reason I "repeat things over and over" is because I see you and others essentially focusing on "how do I get that $5 bill out of that tree?" (175 Congress) when there's a $100 bill lying on the ground right in front of you (garage about to be redeveloped). Why focus so much on the small stuff, when there is large stuff within a stone's throw of the parcel that is still undecided but about to be permanently botched?

I think the biggest problem is that too many people who "have the voice" don't want to see new housing built. They are perfectly comfortable watching their own property values rise and preventing their neighborhoods from getting any busier (ie meeting the existing demand). It's a similar dichotomy to what I complain about in my job. The incentives to help further my own career don't necessarily align with what's best for the company. For Boston residents, they have incentives against more residential development in order to preserve/improve the net worth of their real estate. Obviously renters get crushed, and outsiders can't find a place to live, and in fact it contributes to higher rents across the entire metro (ie my own personal stake in the matter). So most of us are worse off if they botch these parcels, don't build enough housing to offset the insane amount of labs, etc, but those who have the largest voices (Boston property owners) are motivated to make sure this is exactly what happens. Their incentives do not align with improving the city in the ways that it needs to be improved.

When those people are catered to, we dig a deeper hole for ourselves as the housing crisis affects everyone, not just the Boston residents. We're creating all these high-paying new jobs across the metro, but where are all these people supposed to live? I'd rather see them flocking towards a bunch of new tall TOD residentials that I can't afford myself, than competing directly with me in the more modest dwellings. I can't outbid a rich person, so what I need is for them to have enough places to choose from that they don't feel the need to bid against me at all. When we take spots that are prime for a 600' residential (how many units would that be, like 500+?) and instead make them squat labs (bringing in more wealthy people who need places to live) then we are making decisions that will lead to Boston becoming the most unaffordable metro in the country. I may not have a loud voice in Boston proper, but I absolutely have a stake when the decisions there affect me a couple towns over.
 

Suffolk 83

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I have written letters to both the BPDA and Cambridge planning departments at different times, in support of different projects. I don't have a huge outlet as I'm not technically a resident, and some people think I shouldn't get to have any voice whatsoever. So part of what I rely on is relaying my ideas to people who do have that larger voice. Besides here, surrounded by mostly like-minded individuals, where else am I supposed to find those people?

I don't know what kind of voice you might have within the city. However, the reason I "repeat things over and over" is because I see you and others essentially focusing on "how do I get that $5 bill out of that tree?" (175 Congress) when there's a $100 bill lying on the ground right in front of you (garage about to be redeveloped). Why focus so much on the small stuff, when there is large stuff within a stone's throw of the parcel that is still undecided but about to be permanently botched?

I think the biggest problem is that too many people who "have the voice" don't want to see new housing built. They are perfectly comfortable watching their own property values rise and preventing their neighborhoods from getting any busier (ie meeting the existing demand). It's a similar dichotomy to what I complain about in my job. The incentives to help further my own career don't necessarily align with what's best for the company. For Boston residents, they have incentives against more residential development in order to preserve/improve the net worth of their real estate. Obviously renters get crushed, and outsiders can't find a place to live, and in fact it contributes to higher rents across the entire metro (ie my own personal stake in the matter). So most of us are worse off if they botch these parcels, don't build enough housing to offset the insane amount of labs, etc, but those who have the largest voices (Boston property owners) are motivated to make sure this is exactly what happens. Their incentives do not align with improving the city in the ways that it needs to be improved.

When those people are catered to, we dig a deeper hole for ourselves as the housing crisis affects everyone, not just the Boston residents. We're creating all these high-paying new jobs across the metro, but where are all these people supposed to live? I'd rather see them flocking towards a bunch of new tall TOD residentials that I can't afford myself, than competing directly with me in the more modest dwellings. I can't outbid a rich person, so what I need is for them to have enough places to choose from that they don't feel the need to bid against me at all. When we take spots that are prime for a 600' residential (how many units would that be, like 500+?) and instead make them squat labs (bringing in more wealthy people who need places to live) then we are making decisions that will lead to Boston becoming the most unaffordable metro in the country. I may not have a loud voice in Boston proper, but I absolutely have a stake when the decisions there affect me a couple towns over.
Again I agree with you but you do realize we're just a bunch of nerds with no power here? You're not in front of the court pleading your case and most of us already agree with you. Its kind of just picking at a scab because youre a masochist
 

DZH22

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Again I agree with you but you do realize we're just a bunch of nerds with no power here? You're not in front of the court pleading your case and most of us already agree with you. Its kind of just picking at a scab because youre a masochist
Some people with some type of sway look at these sites. I'm sure developers and decision makers stop by from time to time, even if they typically stay silent in the background. They have posted here before. The tallest building in Portland had Catherine of Redfern regularly listening to input from some of our members, and we are very hopeful about the results. Also, local YIMBY's who could appreciate a few extra talking points in their favor can find those in my posts. There's 0% chance that all 2237 members (plus countless non-member visitors) are all just powerless hobbyists, even if we do at least share a love of Boston in general.

So if somebody in the BPDA or a developer reads this and thinks "maybe we SHOULD push for taller/denser residentials rather than 190' labs right next to South Station" and then voices it, then my ideas do get disseminated, even if it isn't overtly obvious here. Maybe I'm just being overly optimistic, but put a picture of the Saltonstall building juxtaposed with the Pru and say "either is possible at the Hurley site" and somebody is going to wonder why we would settle for another Saltonstall. While I would like to increase my own personal involvement, I'm also just hoping that the right person might at least see that and start the wheels grinding in a different direction.

Heck, even Menino changed his tune after about 15 years of being mayor. Maybe he read one of my older posts? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
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Charlie_mta

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I'm pretty sure that influential people look at this board. But even more than that, AB is a creative cauldron of ideas, opinions and concepts for the architectural, planning and engineering professionals who frequent this site, who spread those ideas out to their respective professional communities. So many great principles of city planning, transportation, and quality architecture are continually promoted and discussed on AB. I'm sure it's had an influence on how things are done in the Boston area. As they said at some self-realization seminars I once attended: "Your sphere of influence is greater than you think."
 

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