200 Federal Street | Residential Tower | Portland

Redfern

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Posting a few images of the "Pocket Park" we are working on between the new Federal Street Building and the existing building facing Congress Street. Like the design - pondering materials / lighting. Large wall at the back of the space blocking parking for Post Office is currently a proposed "waterwall". Proposed as corten but thinking given the downtown location I want more "formal" materials. Love to see the ideas and feedback bouncing around on here! Don't be shy! -C


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Portcity75

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I’m so baffled on how all that fits on that small lot. For us development geeks on here, the building out of the project will be as exciting as the finished product.
 

Tom Nevers

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Very cool! Dynamic multicolored lighting built into the wall the water is falling over would be awesome. Turquoise, purple, and red are my personal preferences but I’m open to anything that brings Only God Forgives to mind :)
 

TC_zoid

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Nice. Love the low wall bench seating. This idea is all over Manhattan because the city mandated new towers have public spaces to sit and eat. I can not imagine Manhattan without these spaces. It would become claustrophobic hell without.
 

Redfern

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I’m so baffled on how all that fits on that small lot. For us development geeks on here, the building out of the project will be as exciting as the finished product.
It is crazy - couldn't do it without a solid team of professionals. Thinking this one may need a construction camera! -C
 

Portlander

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Love it, very reminiscent of the redesigned Canal Plaza public space on a much smaller scale. Incorporating a waterfall is an excellent idea and would be a first for downtown Portland. Rooftop of One Canal Plaza or One Portland Square would be a perfect location for a construction camera!
 

Dr. StrangeHat

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Out of curiosity, what kind of trees are you planning there, and any concern that fallen leaves could lead to staining the gray pavers overtime? I do want to encourage trees, but I'd hate to see this become an eyesore over time if that gray becomes more brown (because I do like the gray over traditional red brick).

Also, any plans for any shade element before the trees fully mature to what is presented in the renderings?
 

Redfern

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Out of curiosity, what kind of trees are you planning there, and any concern that fallen leaves could lead to staining the gray pavers overtime? I do want to encourage trees, but I'd hate to see this become an eyesore over time if that gray becomes more brown (because I do like the gray over traditional red brick).

Also, any plans for any shade element before the trees fully mature to what is presented in the renderings?
Elms were mentioned. Good point on the staining of the pavers. Feedback I'm looking for! No plans for shade pre-tree maturity but assuming we will be planting a decent size caliper to start. -C
 

GIL

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Our Literal Inspiration.....It feels more vertically designed where ours seems more horizontally designed. Everything in the park leads your eye up - to the sky. It's absolutely brilliant.
Was a composition considered that ran the tree planters from street to the back, rather than across the space? That could create more of an “alée” or “bosque” feeling and draw people’s eyes through the space to the water feature on the textured wall at the back. Also, if you’re concerned about staining the pavers, did your team consider a light-brown pea-gravel, like along park walks in Paris and London?
 

Max

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I'm not seeing the existing entrance to the post office in these renderings. Will it still be there under the overhang?

And a big YES to a construction camera. I like the 3-angle set up they've got going on over at the Shipyard site:
 

Redfern

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Was a composition considered that ran the tree planters from street to the back, rather than across the space? That could create more of an “alée” or “bosque” feeling and draw people’s eyes through the space to the water feature on the textured wall at the back. Also, if you’re concerned about staining the pavers, did your team consider a light-brown pea-gravel, like along park walks in Paris and London?
Will look at that - since you step down in the space as opposed to up was thinking horizontal might feel a little better. Like the pea-gravel idea. If we can afford to heat the space will seriously consider that. I'm pricing that out but given the construction costs (got bad news on steel just now) it seems like a long shot. The owners of the building next door expressed a desire to keep it clear/usable during winter months so of course the practicality of snow maintenance once again drives the design. If only we had the climate of Seattle! -C
 
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TC_zoid

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Radiant floor heating is a beautiful thing. Outside, can't you submerge pex tubing into a concrete pour, stamp a finish on top, then use rooftop solar to heat a water tank? I have a somewhat rich friend in Palm Springs who did this inside a large house with an entire first level travertine floor. Without shoes, it's like getting a foot massage walking around (Palms Springs is cold at night 6 months of the year). I'll bet the heat would still be felt through your shoes. No snow and ice all year round.
 

nomc

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Dynamic multicolored lighting built into the wall the water is falling over would be awesome.
Yes!

What's your current thinking for illumination of the rest of the park?

Was a composition considered that ran the tree planters from street to the back, rather than across the space? That could create more of an “alée” or “bosque” feeling and draw people’s eyes through the space to the water feature on the textured wall at the back.
In my thought experiment keeping the lines front to back would not only draw the eye to the water feature, but would also make the park feel more vertical. If you entered the park through the door you'd be faced with the row of trees and benches - but I think the gap between a bench and tree would fall directly across from the door.

Is there anything that can be done around the base of the trees instead of the horizontal benches? Not saying this is a good design idea, but it might make for easier snow removal.
 

Joshua Chamberlain

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Our Literal Inspiration.....It feels more vertically designed where ours seems more horizontally designed. Everything in the park leads your eye up - to the sky. It's absolutely brilliant.
I love Paley Park in NYC. This first time I saw it 5 years ago I couldn’t stop thinking how perfect a waterwall feature would be for Portland. I wish you good luck and hope you make this happen.
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It would not lack in Instagram photo shoots...
 

GIL

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Will look at that - since you step down in the space as opposed to up was thinking horizontal might feel a little better. Like the pea-gravel idea. If we can afford to heat the space will seriously consider that. I'm pricing that out but given the construction costs (got bad news on steel just now) it seems like a long shot. The owners of the building next door expressed a desire to keep it clear/usable during winter months so of course the practicality of snow maintenance once again drives the design. If only we had the climate of Seattle! -C
What about a ‘brise soleil’ or arbor frame that provides shade in summer and allows the sun in winter — they are installed at just the right angle for both. Then maybe climbing greenery or climbing hydrangeas to complement elms, beech or sycamores? Beech can be pruned to be shaped like oversized hedges, which can be quite stunning. And I agree about the ginkgos too — when their leaves fall they create a most beautiful yellow carpet.
 

DanielPWM19

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Elms were mentioned. Good point on the staining of the pavers. Feedback I'm looking for! No plans for shade pre-tree maturity but assuming we will be planting a decent size caliper to start. -C
Ginkgo Trees don't cause staining with their leaves, I have one. They can be tall, slender, and don't create a lot of mess like maple, oak, ash, birch, and other varieties make. Some dwarf evergreens could also help with keeping the space "green" year-round.
 

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