52 Hanover St | Apartments | Portland

TC_zoid

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Just realized something about this location and type of apartment building that it is. It will appeal to a younger demo because of the intimacy of the design and pool (party!). It's obvious that it will fit well with USM grad students, as students for law and business will be looking for more private space to live (not dorms). UNE in Biddeford provides housing for its grad students in the renovated mill building across from the Saco Train Station. In this respect, this area in Bayside can support more apartments. It's a cool hang with Bayside Bowl and the Wilson BBQ block, and a short bike ride or walk to either Congress Street or USM. I predict that when USM's new Student Center and dorms open, USM in Gorham will start to wither away. It's an awful campus, and far from what's happening in Portland. I believe 500 or more apartments could be built in this area, and many or perhaps most could be rented by USM students. The new USM Portland will be a dynamic school because of numerous new housing options, along with its location and the train station allowing easy access to Boston.
 
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nomc

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Nice rendering in MaineBiz - planned occupancy is summer 2023. I haven't been by the site recently but the article says they've demo'd the old buildings (I assume they are finished) and they are doing site work.

c03.jpg
 

TC_zoid

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Nice. I drove past last Sunday and yes, the buildings are gone and it looks like site work has started. I love this area now with Batson River, Wilson County Barbecue, and Bayside Bowl. All are great and super cool hangs. For my work, I do marketing and "predict" trends, and can see these apartments being scooped up by grad students attending USM in Portland. I'm feeling, or predicting, that when the new buildings open up at USM (also, summer of 2023), of which some of the units will be apartments designed for senior level students, there will be a substantial new energy and vibe from USM to this new part of Bayside. In addition, I see any housing near USM becoming premium priced (homes on the street behind the law building are already experiencing renovation activity). Portland does not have a serious university, and all over the U.S. hundreds of cities--smaller and far less economically promising ones--have much bigger University or College academic structure footprints. Watch out. By early 2004 my prediction is that you will see a flurry of proposals and activity for new buildings, beefed-up majors, and adjacent renovated housing. I went to USM for one year, years ago, and this location had a lot of inherent energy, even back then. Like they say in real estate, "It's about location, location, location." Onward and upward.
 
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mainejeff

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Nice. I drove past last Sunday and yes, the buildings are gone and it looks like site work has started. I love this area now with Batson River, Wilson County Barbecue, and Bayside Bowl. All are great and super cool hangs. For my work, I do marketing and "predict" trends, and can see these apartments being scooped up by grad students attending USM in Portland. I'm feeling, or predicting, that when the new buildings open up at USM (also, summer of 2023), of which some of the units will be apartments designed for senior level students, there will be a substantial new energy and vibe from USM to this new part of Bayside. In addition, I see any housing near USM becoming premium priced (homes on the street behind the law building are already experiencing renovation activity). Portland does not have a serious university, and all over the U.S. hundreds of cities--smaller and far less economically promising ones--have much bigger University or College academic structure footprints. Watch out. By early 2004 my prediction is that you will see a flurry of proposals and activity for new buildings, beefed-up majors, and adjacent renovated housing. I went to USM for one year, years ago, and this location had a lot of inherent energy, even back then. Like they say in real estate, "It's about location, location, location." Onward and upward.
Do you think USM could or will ever go private? It feels like it is ripe to become a mini-Boston U.
 

TC_zoid

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Do you think USM could or will ever go private? It feels like it is ripe to become a mini-Boston U.
Nope. Although private would be best for entrepreneurial insight and energy, a la UNE. I don't see how this can happen--becoming a virtual giant--unless the next president has a dynamic personality (looks and charm) with business acumen. Cummings is probably partly leaving because of the bureaucratic snafus that many public universities experience. The dumb idea of taking the entire south part of the campus for a $50 million dollar building to showcase the arts is one reason, I'm betting. USM needs a new building for biology and biotech, with a beefed-up program. Also, law and business. The president prior, Botman, epitomized educational lethargy. She got bored and traveled in Europe for a couple of months, ostensibly for "research and new partnerships," and nothing came of it. How? But only complete incompetence will keep USM from growing. But hey, one never knows.
 

DanielPWM19

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Nope. Although private would be best for entrepreneurial insight and energy, a la UNE. I don't see how this can happen--becoming a virtual giant--unless the next president has a dynamic personality (looks and charm) with business acumen. Cummings is probably partly leaving because of the bureaucratic snafus that many public universities experience. The dumb idea of taking the entire south part of the campus for a $50 million dollar building to showcase the arts is one reason, I'm betting. USM needs a new building for biology and biotech, with a beefed-up program. Also, law and business. The president prior, Botman, epitomized educational lethargy. She got bored and traveled in Europe for a couple of months, ostensibly for "research and new partnerships," and nothing came of it. How? But only complete incompetence will keep USM from growing. But hey, one never knows.
Will be interesting to see what Roux Institute will bring to Portland then, if not USM. With connections perhaps to Bayside with a walking trail etc, then this could do more to create a reality in "Midtown" being a central point for USM and Roux for housing, new buildings. One can only hope I guess.
 

markhb

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USM could never go private of its own volition; it's a subordinate creation of the University of Maine System and answers to the UMS Board of Trustees, and I can't see UMS ever allowing it to spin off. Plus, as a public university, it has an incredibly small endowment (c. $38M per a quick Googling) so that's no cushion at all.

So far as the new arts building goes, those programs, music in particular, are some of the ones where USM actually has some decent cred, in the sense that a student searching for "best schools for this major that I can afford" might actually be drawn there. Plus, that's an area (unlike, potentially biotech) where USM doesn't have to get into a Board of Trustees pissing contest with Orono that it'll inevitably lose.

On-topic: cool rendering. I was just down in that area yesterday and do regret the loss of the paving stones on Kennebec St., although my car doesn't.
 

TC_zoid

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USM could never go private of its own volition; it's a subordinate creation of the University of Maine System and answers to the UMS Board of Trustees, and I can't see UMS ever allowing it to spin off. Plus, as a public university, it has an incredibly small endowment (c. $38M per a quick Googling) so that's no cushion at all.

So far as the new arts building goes, those programs, music in particular, are some of the ones where USM actually has some decent cred, in the sense that a student searching for "best schools for this major that I can afford" might actually be drawn there. Plus, that's an area (unlike, potentially biotech) where USM doesn't have to get into a Board of Trustees pissing contest with Orono that it'll inevitably lose.

On-topic: cool rendering. I was just down in that area yesterday and do regret the loss of the paving stones on Kennebec St., although my car doesn't.
Yes, it does have some impressive cred with its music program. But that's been with an old Harry Potter-ish looking structure in Gorham. I hardly think they need $50 million to improve. So, let's give them $5 million to renovate something in Portland. Still nice. Also, for more cred, Bob Ludwig of Gateway Mastering in Portland has 35 Grammy Awards. Perhaps build something named after him? 35 Grammy Awards would look kind of nice in the lobby, you think?
 

nomc

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Yes, it does have some impressive cred with its music program. But that's been with an old Harry Potter-ish looking structure in Gorham. I hardly think they need $50 million to improve. So, let's give them $5 million to renovate something in Portland. Still nice. Also, for more cred, Bob Ludwig of Gateway Mastering in Portland has 35 Grammy Awards. Perhaps build something named after him? 35 Grammy Awards would look kind of nice in the lobby, you think?
They're spending all that money on a building with an auditorium the same size (or smaller?) than the one they currently have... which is inadequately sized, can't fit an orchestra.

I don't believe Bob has any direct ties to USM, but Adam Ayan, the other mastering engineer at Gateway (and a Grammy/Latin Grammy winner), has taught a course there for a long time.
 

TC_zoid

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Honorary Degree. Why not? Portland has been his home for the last 30 years. What else can Maine boast for in music? Some of these musicians even came to Portland.
Ludwig's mastering credits include albums for many major classic artists, such as the Kronos Quartet, and rock acts, including Jimi Hendrix, Phish, Rush, Motley Crüe, Megadeth, Metallica, Gloria Estefan, Nirvana, The Strokes, Queen, U2, Sting, The Police, Janet Jackson, Mariah Carey, Beck, Guns N' Roses, Richie Sambora, Tool, Simple Minds, Bryan Ferry, Tori Amos, Bonnie Raitt, Mark Knopfler, Leonard Cohen, David Bowie, Paul McCartney, Bruce Springsteen, the Bee Gees, Madonna, Richard Wood,[5] Supertramp, Will Ackerman, Pet Shop Boys, Radiohead, Elton John, Daft Punk[2] and Alabama Shakes.[6]
 

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