Biking in Boston

KCasiglio

New member
Joined
Oct 19, 2019
Messages
37
Reaction score
43
Part of me supports this idea wholeheartedly. The other part feels like this is a prime way to get citizens in a bunch of knock-down, drag-out fights with one-another.
Yeah, I think ideally there is no citizen-citizen contact in this but inevitably someone is going to see someone snapping a picture of their car and react. I think as long as the citizen-enforcer isn't the final say on the matter it shouldn't be too big of an issue. Given that these interactions are taking place on our main thoroughfares I think the risk of violence is minimal. I'd limit it to bike/bus lane violations for that exact reason. We don't need neighbors on a sleepy Brighton side street taking things into their own hands because someone blocked a bit of someone's driveway.
 

Roxxma

Active Member
Joined
May 25, 2006
Messages
495
Reaction score
3
Yeah, I think ideally there is no citizen-citizen contact in this but inevitably someone is going to see someone snapping a picture of their car and react. I think as long as the citizen-enforcer isn't the final say on the matter it shouldn't be too big of an issue. Given that these interactions are taking place on our main thoroughfares I think the risk of violence is minimal. I'd limit it to bike/bus lane violations for that exact reason. We don't need neighbors on a sleepy Brighton side street taking things into their own hands because someone blocked a bit of someone's driveway.
There is a mechanism for reporting bad or unsafe driving: Registry of Motor Vehicles Complaint of Improper Operation. Citizens can refer incidents to the RMV and they'll follow up and may even schedule an administrative hearing. I don't know anyone who has done this, but it seems like a good idea...
 

millerm277

Active Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
235
Reaction score
45
Given that these interactions are taking place on our main thoroughfares I think the risk of violence is minimal. I'd limit it to bike/bus lane violations for that exact reason.
Consider me in the highly, highly skeptical camp of that. There's plenty of road rage incidents in highly public places as it is, and those are just because someone's fragile ego was wounded, without any money being involved.

That's going to get someone intentionally run over with a car.
 

sm89

Active Member
Joined
Apr 29, 2014
Messages
906
Reaction score
27
Yeah, I think ideally there is no citizen-citizen contact in this but inevitably someone is going to see someone snapping a picture of their car and react. I think as long as the citizen-enforcer isn't the final say on the matter it shouldn't be too big of an issue. Given that these interactions are taking place on our main thoroughfares I think the risk of violence is minimal. I'd limit it to bike/bus lane violations for that exact reason. We don't need neighbors on a sleepy Brighton side street taking things into their own hands because someone blocked a bit of someone's driveway.
I haven't heard anything else out of DC since the concept was proposed earlier this year. https://www.citylab.com/transportation/2019/05/parking-tickets-citizen-safety-enforcement-vision-zero-dc/590122/
 

HenryAlan

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2009
Messages
2,308
Reaction score
296
BPD supposedly gave BTD commitments that lanes would be enforced. I'm guessing practically this means that the cops gave people warnings on the first three days and haven't done a damn thing since.
There is minimal enforcement. My daily commute has me riding on two different bus/bike lanes or if I take the 'T, riding on one. I always see lots of cars parked in these lanes or using them to pass other cars, approach turn too early, etc. They are still better than nothing, but without enforcement, they are not nearly as effective as they could be. As for the idea somebody else mentioned, for citizen enforcement, I don't think that would work, but robot enforcement would. It should work much like the automated tolls on the Pike, Tobin, and harbor tunnels. Drive or park in the bus lane, expect a fine in the mail. It wouldn't take very long for such a system to modify behavior.
 

millerm277

Active Member
Joined
Jun 25, 2013
Messages
235
Reaction score
45
There is minimal enforcement. My daily commute has me riding on two different bus/bike lanes or if I take the 'T, riding on one. I always see lots of cars parked in these lanes or using them to pass other cars, approach turn too early, etc. They are still better than nothing, but without enforcement, they are not nearly as effective as they could be. As for the idea somebody else mentioned, for citizen enforcement, I don't think that would work, but robot enforcement would. It should work much like the automated tolls on the Pike, Tobin, and harbor tunnels. Drive or park in the bus lane, expect a fine in the mail. It wouldn't take very long for such a system to modify behavior.
There's a lot of types of camera enforcement I'm less than thrilled about, but enforcement cameras for bus lanes have worked well elsewhere, and present far fewer of the ethical issues/questionable incentives that have plagued red light camera programs.

It does take a change to state law to make that legal though, I think.
 

FK4

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
2,500
Reaction score
134
There is minimal enforcement. My daily commute has me riding on two different bus/bike lanes or if I take the 'T, riding on one. I always see lots of cars parked in these lanes or using them to pass other cars, approach turn too early, etc. They are still better than nothing, but without enforcement, they are not nearly as effective as they could be. As for the idea somebody else mentioned, for citizen enforcement, I don't think that would work, but robot enforcement would. It should work much like the automated tolls on the Pike, Tobin, and harbor tunnels. Drive or park in the bus lane, expect a fine in the mail. It wouldn't take very long for such a system to modify behavior.
There’s no enforcement in Boston on anything, whatsoever. It’s pathetic. Everybody knows it, the papers have written about it, people have ranted about it here, nothing will change unless they break the spine of the cop union and get someone who isn’t super cozy with police in the mayors office.
 

whighlander

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 14, 2006
Messages
7,542
Reaction score
516
There’s no enforcement in Boston on anything, whatsoever. It’s pathetic. Everybody knows it, the papers have written about it, people have ranted about it here, nothing will change unless they break the spine of the cop union and get someone who isn’t super cozy with police in the mayors office.
FK -- especially the bicyclists who don't seem to respect the Laws of Physics in their riding
The real problem of course is that there are accidental examples of enforcement of the Laws of Physics - -and the penalties can be quite severe up to and including instant immortality

I was a near witness [and minor participant] to such a couple of weeks ago. The Town of Lexington placed a bicycle lane inboard of a line of parking meters along a stretch of Mass Ave. I was preparing to enter my car and was balancing a cup of coffee on my car roof with a small paper plate en-pastried when a bicyclist [outfitted at least] to participate in one of the sprint segments of the Tour de France whizzed past me. I estimated his speed at in excess of 20 mph*1 [under the local speed limit of 25 mph] without even looking up. Had I corralled my coffee and the pastries more efficiently [it was quite windy] and opened my car door a bit earlier -- he would have pancaked into the door and if he was lucky only the wreckage of his bike would have stopped instantly -- he would have continued in an airborne fashion for a few more meters. At the point of the near impact [he passed my left shoulder by less than the length of my arm while I was standing directly adjacent to my car door.

So my question is who is going to enforce the laws against crazy bicycling short of Mr. Newton

*1 after I got into my car and drove off -- I caught-up with the bicyclist a couple of blocks down Mass Ave -- he was still proceeding as before and I measured his speed on my speedometer
 

F-Line to Dudley

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 2, 2010
Messages
5,790
Reaction score
698
FK -- especially the bicyclists who don't seem to respect the Laws of Physics in their riding
The real problem of course is that there are accidental examples of enforcement of the Laws of Physics - -and the penalties can be quite severe up to and including instant immortality

I was a near witness [and minor participant] to such a couple of weeks ago. The Town of Lexington placed a bicycle lane inboard of a line of parking meters along a stretch of Mass Ave. I was preparing to enter my car and was balancing a cup of coffee on my car roof with a small paper plate en-pastried when a bicyclist [outfitted at least] to participate in one of the sprint segments of the Tour de France whizzed past me. I estimated his speed at in excess of 20 mph*1 [under the local speed limit of 25 mph] without even looking up. Had I corralled my coffee and the pastries more efficiently [it was quite windy] and opened my car door a bit earlier -- he would have pancaked into the door and if he was lucky only the wreckage of his bike would have stopped instantly -- he would have continued in an airborne fashion for a few more meters. At the point of the near impact [he passed my left shoulder by less than the length of my arm while I was standing directly adjacent to my car door.

So my question is who is going to enforce the laws against crazy bicycling short of Mr. Newton

*1 after I got into my car and drove off -- I caught-up with the bicyclist a couple of blocks down Mass Ave -- he was still proceeding as before and I measured his speed on my speedometer
This has been the exception that proves the rule, brought to you by this thing that happened to me--ME!--personally.

Pay no mind to things like measurable statistics informing actionable decisions on where the enforcement pie should be divided. This happened to me, and I am destroyer of worlds, so there. . . 🦖



(Some people actually believe ^this^, see. 🤡)
 

George_Apley

Not a Brahmin
Staff member
Joined
Jan 22, 2012
Messages
4,356
Reaction score
717
FK -- especially the bicyclists who don't seem to respect the Laws of Physics in their riding
The real problem of course is that there are accidental examples of enforcement of the Laws of Physics - -and the penalties can be quite severe up to and including instant immortality

I was a near witness [and minor participant] to such a couple of weeks ago. The Town of Lexington placed a bicycle lane inboard of a line of parking meters along a stretch of Mass Ave. I was preparing to enter my car and was balancing a cup of coffee on my car roof with a small paper plate en-pastried when a bicyclist [outfitted at least] to participate in one of the sprint segments of the Tour de France whizzed past me. I estimated his speed at in excess of 20 mph*1 [under the local speed limit of 25 mph] without even looking up. Had I corralled my coffee and the pastries more efficiently [it was quite windy] and opened my car door a bit earlier -- he would have pancaked into the door and if he was lucky only the wreckage of his bike would have stopped instantly -- he would have continued in an airborne fashion for a few more meters. At the point of the near impact [he passed my left shoulder by less than the length of my arm while I was standing directly adjacent to my car door.

So my question is who is going to enforce the laws against crazy bicycling short of Mr. Newton

*1 after I got into my car and drove off -- I caught-up with the bicyclist a couple of blocks down Mass Ave -- he was still proceeding as before and I measured his speed on my speedometer
So, to sum up your story, you avoided dooring a cyclist because you paid attention. But because you were startled by it, you’re upset that the cyclist was traveling swiftly yet legally in a (albeit poorly designed) bicycle lane.
 

KCasiglio

New member
Joined
Oct 19, 2019
Messages
37
Reaction score
43
FK -- especially the bicyclists who don't seem to respect the Laws of Physics in their riding
The real problem of course is that there are accidental examples of enforcement of the Laws of Physics - -and the penalties can be quite severe up to and including instant immortality

I was a near witness [and minor participant] to such a couple of weeks ago. The Town of Lexington placed a bicycle lane inboard of a line of parking meters along a stretch of Mass Ave. I was preparing to enter my car and was balancing a cup of coffee on my car roof with a small paper plate en-pastried when a bicyclist [outfitted at least] to participate in one of the sprint segments of the Tour de France whizzed past me. I estimated his speed at in excess of 20 mph*1 [under the local speed limit of 25 mph] without even looking up. Had I corralled my coffee and the pastries more efficiently [it was quite windy] and opened my car door a bit earlier -- he would have pancaked into the door and if he was lucky only the wreckage of his bike would have stopped instantly -- he would have continued in an airborne fashion for a few more meters. At the point of the near impact [he passed my left shoulder by less than the length of my arm while I was standing directly adjacent to my car door.

So my question is who is going to enforce the laws against crazy bicycling short of Mr. Newton

*1 after I got into my car and drove off -- I caught-up with the bicyclist a couple of blocks down Mass Ave -- he was still proceeding as before and I measured his speed on my speedometer
It sounds like you would have been at fault had the near miss incidence you describe occurred. George is giving you too much credit by saying you were paying attention.

Yes the lane is poorly designed. You're still responsible for not opening your door into oncoming traffic.
 

HenryAlan

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 15, 2009
Messages
2,308
Reaction score
296
FK -- especially the bicyclists who don't seem to respect the Laws of Physics in their riding
The real problem of course is that there are accidental examples of enforcement of the Laws of Physics - -and the penalties can be quite severe up to and including instant immortality

I was a near witness [and minor participant] to such a couple of weeks ago. The Town of Lexington placed a bicycle lane inboard of a line of parking meters along a stretch of Mass Ave. I was preparing to enter my car and was balancing a cup of coffee on my car roof with a small paper plate en-pastried when a bicyclist [outfitted at least] to participate in one of the sprint segments of the Tour de France whizzed past me. I estimated his speed at in excess of 20 mph*1 [under the local speed limit of 25 mph] without even looking up. Had I corralled my coffee and the pastries more efficiently [it was quite windy] and opened my car door a bit earlier -- he would have pancaked into the door and if he was lucky only the wreckage of his bike would have stopped instantly -- he would have continued in an airborne fashion for a few more meters. At the point of the near impact [he passed my left shoulder by less than the length of my arm while I was standing directly adjacent to my car door.

So my question is who is going to enforce the laws against crazy bicycling short of Mr. Newton

*1 after I got into my car and drove off -- I caught-up with the bicyclist a couple of blocks down Mass Ave -- he was still proceeding as before and I measured his speed on my speedometer
Suppose it were not a bike, but another car in your example. Do you ever look for moving vehicles approaching before attempting to get in or out of your car? Do you actually think a person driving a car, regardless of how they might be dressed, will likely stop and wait for you to get your shit together before proceeding past you? You may be right about laws of physics -- it may well be impossible for somebody traveling within the legal speed limit to suddenly stop when you step in front of them. We should probably have lower speed limits on such roads. But above all, don't step in front of an approaching vehicle -- look both ways, be more careful.
 

#bancars

Active Member
Joined
Jun 1, 2019
Messages
138
Reaction score
184
Suppose it were not a bike, but another car in your example. Do you ever look for moving vehicles approaching before attempting to get in or out of your car? Do you actually think a person driving a car, regardless of how they might be dressed, will likely stop and wait for you to get your shit together before proceeding past you? You may be right about laws of physics -- it may well be impossible for somebody traveling within the legal speed limit to suddenly stop when you step in front of them. We should probably have lower speed limits on such roads. But above all, don't step in front of an approaching vehicle -- look both ways, be more careful.
Agreed on all points, and this entire discussion just highlights the need for more protected cycletracks, parking protected bike lanes, and off-street bike infra!
 

real_EthanHunt

New member
Joined
Jul 18, 2019
Messages
27
Reaction score
20
This has been the exception that proves the rule, brought to you by this thing that happened to me--ME!--personally.
haha, this is great. But the best part about the original post is that it didnt happen TO him, he did it to himself and then complains about what the other person did. He admits walking/standing in a travel lane and then blames the somebody else for actually traveling (less than the speed limit) in said lane.
other people have already said it, but if this was a 8' parking lane next to an 11' travel lane (both standard widths), there wouldnt be any expectation that somebody should be able to go around the side of their car in the travel lane when cars were coming.
 

FK4

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
2,500
Reaction score
134
FK -- especially the bicyclists who don't seem to respect the Laws of Physics in their riding
The real problem of course is that there are accidental examples of enforcement of the Laws of Physics - -and the penalties can be quite severe up to and including instant immortality

I was a near witness [and minor participant] to such a couple of weeks ago. The Town of Lexington placed a bicycle lane inboard of a line of parking meters along a stretch of Mass Ave. I was preparing to enter my car and was balancing a cup of coffee on my car roof with a small paper plate en-pastried when a bicyclist [outfitted at least] to participate in one of the sprint segments of the Tour de France whizzed past me. I estimated his speed at in excess of 20 mph*1 [under the local speed limit of 25 mph] without even looking up. Had I corralled my coffee and the pastries more efficiently [it was quite windy] and opened my car door a bit earlier -- he would have pancaked into the door and if he was lucky only the wreckage of his bike would have stopped instantly -- he would have continued in an airborne fashion for a few more meters. At the point of the near impact [he passed my left shoulder by less than the length of my arm while I was standing directly adjacent to my car door.

So my question is who is going to enforce the laws against crazy bicycling short of Mr. Newton

*1 after I got into my car and drove off -- I caught-up with the bicyclist a couple of blocks down Mass Ave -- he was still proceeding as before and I measured his speed on my speedometer
I’m not as aggrieved at this post as others. It’s a bit ridiculous, but let’s not all pigpile on because we’re pro bike... I can’t stand the super aggressive cyclists; they exist and while they’re a minor problem, they are an issue. I can relate to the frustration of having someone very aggressively whiz by you, too close, without slowing down. It’s like the drivers that speed up so they don’t have to stop for you in the crosswalk. Anyway, any actual biking updates lately?
 
Last edited:

Vagabond

Active Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Messages
120
Reaction score
161
Baker-Polito Administration Announces Construction Will Begin to Complete Northern Strand Community Trail
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
2/07/2020

1581712164152.png
 

FK4

Senior Member
Joined
Nov 13, 2012
Messages
2,500
Reaction score
134
Baker-Polito Administration Announces Construction Will Begin to Complete Northern Strand Community Trail
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
2/07/2020

View attachment 3420
This is great news. Is that map accurate, though? Or is it just a stock photo? I am unable to find anything believable as to what the route of the extension is, and whether or not it is going to go across the commuter rail tracks or not.
 

kjdonovan

Active Member
Joined
Nov 7, 2006
Messages
479
Reaction score
39
With these last three posts, this may have just become the most efficient thread on this board.
 

Top