Boston Parking Lots

tysmith95

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Almost every target in existence, with the exception of downtown, Fenway, BU and central square.

Suburban targets have the world's largest parking lots and they're never full.
 

Charlie_mta

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Not to pour cold water on any ideas for getting rid of the asphalt scar on the city that is the South Bay parking sink, but who actually owns it? If it's a private property, that's a whole different scenario to if we're talking about public land, in terms of what can be taken from it or done to it.
There's obviously eminent domain the city could easily get away with in this case to create official bus lanes and a public right-of-way.
 

Brattle Loop

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There's obviously eminent domain the city could easily get away with in this case to create official bus lanes and a public right-of-way.
Oh, I don't dispute that there's a "public use" case for eminent domaining part of the parking lot for roads/bus lanes. I quibble with "easily", because while that'd definitely be low-hanging fruit in eminent domain terms, it's still a hassle (and not free) and has a chance of getting ugly if the property owner is unwilling. That said, I was curious about the ownership situation mostly because earlier posts also mentioned redevelopment beyond bus lanes/roadways, which would not be anywhere near as easy to swing from an eminent domain perspective. You're right about the relative ease of just the bus lane/road part of the suggestion.
 

Charlie_mta

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Oh, I don't dispute that there's a "public use" case for eminent domaining part of the parking lot for roads/bus lanes. I quibble with "easily", because while that'd definitely be low-hanging fruit in eminent domain terms, it's still a hassle (and not free) and has a chance of getting ugly if the property owner is unwilling. That said, I was curious about the ownership situation mostly because earlier posts also mentioned redevelopment beyond bus lanes/roadways, which would not be anywhere near as easy to swing from an eminent domain perspective. You're right about the relative ease of just the bus lane/road part of the suggestion.
You're right, it would cost a good amount to acquire the right-of-way. Parking lot spaces are at a premium and not cheap. But I look at the vast urban renewal acquisitions of entire neighborhoods in the 1950s and 60s, the construction of the interstate highway system through the middle of cities across America, and so a small ROW across a parking lot is is doable even in this age of NIMBYs and analysis paralysis that sidelines many infrastructure projects. Bus lanes, both on existing streets and on new ROWs, are feasible from a funding and political perspective, and I'd like to see them developed to the max.
 

Stlin

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Not to pour cold water on any ideas for getting rid of the asphalt scar on the city that is the South Bay parking sink, but who actually owns it? If it's a private property, that's a whole different scenario to if we're talking about public land, in terms of what can be taken from it or done to it.
According to The city assessor tax parcel database, the ownership situation is fractured. The strip mall side, old navy, the stop and shop and the entirety of Allstate Rd are owned by entities affiliated with "E&A Northeast," which is it's self owned by Edens, which appears to be a large national retail developer/REIT whose CEO is a director of the Richmond Fed. The Home Depot and Target sites and most of their their associated parking is owned by their respective corporate entities.

Edit: Speaking of this area, what exactly are the functions housed at that Eversource Facility across the way, and how much of it actually needs to be here? It's not exactly all parking lot, but a lot of it is parking and open air materials storage. (a parking lot by any other name.) As far as I can tell, it's not fundamentally part of the natural Gas system or electricity grid. The existing buildings don't align well with the street layout either. That site can be pretty heavily densified, even if it remains heavy industrial.
 
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