Is parking too cheap?

HenryAlan

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There are too many anti-car, and especially anti-off-street parking people to allow anyone to build a parking garage from scratch which is not intrinsic to another component of a large development
Ironically enough, that group will quite easily get on board. They believe that most parking is only built due to mandates in the building code. I know quite a few people in this group, and they tend to favor market-based solutions on the assumption that parking exceeds demand when unsubsidized and that a free market will adjust quantity accordingly. The challenge will not be anti-car folks, but people who can't conceive of parking in a garage a couple of blocks from their apartment, or who are unwilling to accept the idea that their current parking situation is subsidized.
 

curcuas

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If there are so many crazy anti-parking-at-all-costs people out there, how do we still have parking minima? The statement is silly. Let's let the market rule parking and enable cheaper housing and not be building empty, expensive garages.
 

shmessy

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If there are so many crazy anti-parking-at-all-costs people out there, how do we still have parking minima? The statement is silly. Let's let the market rule parking and enable cheaper housing and not be building empty, expensive garages.
Personally, I am not an anti-parking at all costs person, but I am certainly a "the city should not be losing economic opportunity due to parking" person.

The amount of real estate taken by garages and side of street parking actually HURTS the city economically. That is an, objectively, dollar opportunity cost. Widening the transpo lanes, by not having both sides of the street parking, improves transit flow and economic efficiency of a city. The streets of a city are the vessels and arteries. On-street parking is plaque.

I am fully in favor of inner cities treating parking like states have treated tobacco or fossil fuels. Tax the hell out of it for revenue stream. Parking a car in the city is an individual, not society-based, benefit. The city shouldn't subsidize it, the individual should bear the costs. JMHO.

The opportunity cost of parking garages (I'd like to see the full square footage numbers for Boston) is how much more housing capacity would be freed up by repurposing what is already there over the next few decades as the inevitable technological changes occur.
 
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