North Washington St Bridge

Jahvon09

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They'll have to fix this & make it right. The question is how? :unsure:
 

ulrichomega

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What do you mean "how"? They'll fix the bridge, possibly be redesigning some elements to better support the broken welds.

The only real question is how long we're going to be stuck with a "temporary" bridge. What's the record for the longest time a bridge was supposed to be temporary but was never taken down? I know the Rourke Bridge is super old and rickety because it was never supposed to be permanent.
 

bigpicture7

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What do you mean "how"? They'll fix the bridge, possibly be redesigning some elements to better support the broken welds.

The only real question is how long we're going to be stuck with a "temporary" bridge. What's the record for the longest time a bridge was supposed to be temporary but was never taken down? I know the Rourke Bridge is super old and rickety because it was never supposed to be permanent.
My mind immediately went to the Rourke over the Merrimack. That thing is a legend and must be some kind of record. It's been there at least over 30 years.
 

Highwayguy

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It's been there at least over 30 years.
Opened in 1982 to provide relief during the School St Bridge closure, so 40 years young. The replacement bridge is at 10% design, so outside chance it hits 50 by the time construction wraps.

Id argue that the Rourke is a bit cheating since it is a functionally new crossing and the School St Bridge it was meant to detour traffic around has long been reopened. If we limit ourselves to temporary bridges where the permanent structure is still closed, the Bly Bascule Bridge on 107 in Lynn/Saugus is a strong contender. The temp bridge has been in use since 2013.
 
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Jahvon09

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What do you mean "how"? They'll fix the bridge, possibly be redesigning some elements to better support the broken welds.

The only real question is how long we're going to be stuck with a "temporary" bridge. What's the record for the longest time a bridge was supposed to be temporary but was never taken down? I know the Rourke Bridge is super old and rickety because it was never supposed to be permanent.

It seemed to be going smoothly, Then sudddenly, things hit a snag! Now it's at a complete standstill. It has now turned into another years-long Dig Dig-style project!! :eek:
 

Patrick Winn

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What do you mean "how"? They'll fix the bridge, possibly be redesigning some elements to better support the broken welds.

The only real question is how long we're going to be stuck with a "temporary" bridge. What's the record for the longest time a bridge was supposed to be temporary but was never taken down? I know the Rourke Bridge is super old and rickety because it was never supposed to be permanent.
I don’t understand your problem with his question. I think everyone is trying to figure out how to fix it right now and I wouldn’t be surprised if they end up having to tear it down and start over.
What do you mean "how"? They'll fix the bridge, possibly be redesigning some elements to better support the broken welds.

The only real question is how long we're going to be stuck with a "temporary" bridge. What's the record for the longest time a bridge was supposed to be temporary but was never taken down? I know the Rourke Bridge is super old and rickety because it was never supposed to be permanent.
I don’t understand your problem with Jahvon’s question. I think everyone is trying to figure out how to fix it right now and I wouldn’t be surprised if they end up having to tear it down and start over. If it was as easy as you say they’d have done it already. I think the question was germane and your response was rude.
 

Blackbird

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Yeah, if it was as easy as “add some more supports”, then they’d probably be doing it right now.
 

HenryAlan

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Right, if the only thing to report is doing repairs to temporary bridge, then this project is going no where fast.
Seriously, that is not something that should be happening. Now I'm wondering at what point the temporary bridge will need to be replaced with a new temporary bridge, and whether the new bridge will be any further along.
 

BeyondRevenue

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It would be plain silly to rip it all down.
My bet is they know how to fix it. What they're doing now is trying to figure out how to fix it cheaply, and trying to determine who built what part or it incorrectly so they can stick that company with the overbill.
/speculation.
This post needz moar fakz.
 

stefal

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This posts seems to have been ignored:

Latest I heard is that this is looking like a $40-$50M screw up and they'll be going after E&O insurance to cover it.
E&O can take a while to settle especially at that amount, and $40-50 million is a good 1/4th+ of the project. Likely means some serious redesign or rebuilding..
 

bigpicture7

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This posts seems to have been ignored:



E&O can take a while to settle especially at that amount, and $40-50 million is a good 1/4th+ of the project. Likely means some serious redesign or rebuilding..
Yes, but the state should be fronting the money to move ahead in the mean time, while legally establishing themselves as the recipient of the insurance money once it's paid. This is a public infrastructure project, first and foremost.
 

stefal

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Yes, but the state should be fronting the money to move ahead in the mean time, while legally establishing themselves as the recipient of the insurance money once it's paid. This is a public infrastructure project, first and foremost.
I can't say exactly how MassDOT works with E&Os, but other public agencies work mostly in the way you describe, and I expect roughly the same is going on here. However, we're just over a month since that post. In the places I'm familiar with, the standard is up to 135 days including internal review and external communication and agreement on restitution. I can't imagine an owner agreeing to pay up prior to having a method of restitution ready/in writing. This is 30% of the construction cost - I'm sure both sides are taking their time getting this sorted out.
 

Jahvon09

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I can't say exactly how MassDOT works with E&Os, but other public agencies work mostly in the way you describe, and I expect roughly the same is going on here. However, we're just over a month since that post. In the places I'm familiar with, the standard is up to 135 days including internal review and external communication and agreement on restitution. I can't imagine an owner agreeing to pay up prior to having a method of restitution ready/in writing. This is 30% of the construction cost - I'm sure both sides are taking their time getting this sorted out.
The infrastructure of bridges & tunnels in Boston is quite obselete. They need to be repaired badly before a tragedy happens, such as the one that occured in Minnisota with the I-135 bridge. Remember that one. The thought was there with the old TappanZee Bridge before it was completely replaced. :eek:
New I-135W Bridge..jpg
New TappanZee Bridge..jpg
 
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stick n move

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Repair work on unfinished North Washington Street Bridge has started; state hopes to open span to vehicles in December, 2023


MassDOT officials said tonight workers are busy fixing defective welds on the new North Washington Street Bridge and that they should be done by the end of December, letting non-repair construction resume in January - with a goal of switching three vehicle lanes and sidewalks over from the current temporary bridge in December, 2023.

However, the new bridge won't be fully open until December, 2024, MassDOT officials said at a meeting of the North End/Waterfront Residents Association.
https://www.universalhub.com/2022/repair-work-unfinished-north-washginton-street
 

Patrick Winn

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Repair work on unfinished North Washington Street Bridge has started; state hopes to open span to vehicles in December, 2023


MassDOT officials said tonight workers are busy fixing defective welds on the new North Washington Street Bridge and that they should be done by the end of December, letting non-repair construction resume in January - with a goal of switching three vehicle lanes and sidewalks over from the current temporary bridge in December, 2023.

However, the new bridge won't be fully open until December, 2024, MassDOT officials said at a meeting of the North End/Waterfront Residents Association.
https://www.universalhub.com/2022/repair-work-unfinished-north-washginton-street
I consider this good news. Thanks for the update.
 

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