Skyline & Aerial photos | Portland

TC_zoid

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That's some serious HVAC on top of the Shipyard Brewery. What are they doing in there? Can't just be beer.
 

DanielPWM19

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The Hiawatha is such a good example of good in-fill projects that Portland needs. I also wish the wedge-shaped building came into fruition next to The Snug at the corner of Washington/Congress. Will be nice if the lot next to 106 Cumberland is actually developed. I hate the gas stations. This also makes me miss my old apartment in the Marlborough Building.
 

Portlander

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I love the Marlborough Building and have always wished it would have been built on Congress Street instead of High where it doesn't get the attention it deserves from an architectural standpoint. The building is also very similar to The Wadsworth at 30 Preble Street where my mother had an apartment in the mid 50's.
 
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GIL

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The intersection of Cumberland and Washington has so much potential. I'd love to see a development team redevelop each of those corner lots into a well-coordinated, mixed-use "square" – a tree-lined public space for outdoor tables on the 7 Eleven lot – lined with cafe/restaurant/retail on the first floor of a six- to eight-story residential building; then the other three corners could each have a four- to five-story residential buildings with smaller street-level retail, forming a cohesive street-wall on all corners. It could really feel like a new hub for that part of the East End and an active, welcoming gateway to the Washington Street corridor from Congress.
 
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DanielPWM19

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The intersection of Cumberland and Washington has so much potential. I'd love to see a development team redevelop each of those corner lots into a well-coordinated, mixed-use "square" – a tree-lined public space for outdoor tables on the Big Apple lot – lined with cafe/restaurant/retail on the first floor of a six- to eight-story residential building; then the other three corners could each have a four- to five-story residential buildings with smaller street-level retail, forming a cohesive street-wall on all corners. It could really feel like a new hub for that part of the East End and an active, welcoming gateway to the Washington Street corridor from Congress.
Would certainly help with tying in the East End with downtown more too.
 

um1990

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Nice Matt.
Funny, to me it looks like the Church Spire is higher than 201 Federal in the first picture, but not in the second. I guess it's the angle.

I remember coming home from Nova Scotia on the Scotia Prince many years ago, and seeing the Portland skyline from quite far away...
Reminiscing, and thinking that 201 Federal would make a noticeable difference on that approach.
 

mainejeff

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Great shots! This statement might be controversial......Portland's waterfront is way underutilized.....too many wharfs....those pilings are hideous....way too little public space and access to the actual waterfront. Look at other great American coastal cities. Portland needs to pick it up in that regard.
 

Cosakita18

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Great shots! This statement might be controversial......Portland's waterfront is way underutilized.....too many wharfs....those pilings are hideous....way too little public space and access to the actual waterfront. Look at other great American coastal cities. Portland needs to pick it up in that regard.
I do disagree with that assessment. Portland actually does a great job with balancing a wide array of uses along the waterfront and preserving legacy marine-dependent uses. There's also a lot of work being done to open up the Eastern Waterfront to the public...Plus the State Pier is open to the public now too. We've added quite a bit of waterfront public space in the past 10 years.

I often hear people say that our waterfront is "underutilized" and to me that's just a codeword for saying "Kick out the fisherman and put in some hotels and breweries"

It's easy to forget that Portland's working waterfront is itself a tourist attraction and something that makes the city unique.
 

mainejeff

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I do disagree with that assessment. Portland actually does a great job with balancing a wide array of uses along the waterfront and preserving legacy marine-dependent uses. There's also a lot of work being done to open up the Eastern Waterfront to the public...Plus the State Pier is open to the public now too. We've added quite a bit of waterfront public space in the past 10 years.

I often hear people say that our waterfront is "underutilized" and to me that's just a codeword for saying "Kick out the fisherman and put in some hotels and breweries"

It's easy to forget that Portland's working waterfront is itself a tourist attraction and something that makes the city unique.
I know way less about Portland's waterfront than a lot of you guys....thanks for educating me at where everything is at regarding public access. That being said.....I'd like to refine my opinion. I think that the future of "legacy marine-dependent uses" is trending down.....which means now is the time to plan for the future of those spaces....or at least some of them.

The other point.....Portland's waterfront is pretty fugly. Yes some people find it "charming" and it's definitely "historical"....in a dilapidated way. Just seems like from an outsider's perspective.....the waterfront is not being maximized to its fullest potential....or as attractive as it could be.....I think that I fall somewhere between TC_zoid and yourself.
 

Portlander

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Your photo really shows the unattractive but slowly improving backside of the Portland skyline. Attention to detail on the facades, design and materials have always been more upscale as viewed from the harbor as compared to Back Cove. This is evidenced by the less impressive rear views of the Time & Temperature, Fidelity, 511, Clapp and Masonic buildings along with the Eastland Hotel which is not shown.
 
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PWMFlyer

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The Dark, Industrial, and Ugly side of Portland. Federated as this time would have built out their project and blocked out the ugly
 

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