South Station Tower | South Station | Downtown

MjolnirMan

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kmp1284's statement is very reasonable, however, because both South Station and the Pike carry commuters largely from the West & South West. Creating delays in both at once will exacerbate issues for the same commuting population, as opposed to (i.e.) the Allston work being done at the same time as a project at North Station.
 

JeffDowntown

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kmp1284's statement is very reasonable, however, because both South Station and the Pike carry commuters largely from the West & South West. Creating delays in both at once will exacerbate issues for the same commuting population, as opposed to (i.e.) the Allston work being done at the same time as a project at North Station.
Practically speaking aren't the two projects happening in sequence, not simultaneously?

Seems that the South Station Tower is about to break ground, and I suspect the worst disruption will be during the first year or so.

Straightening the Pike is no where close to breaking ground. I suspect we will still be arguing about configuration options five years from now.

However, lesser Pike and rail disruptions near Boylston Street (air rights) are likely to happen at the same time as the South Station Tower.
 

Rover

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kmp1284's statement is very reasonable, however, because both South Station and the Pike carry commuters largely from the West & South West. Creating delays in both at once will exacerbate issues for the same commuting population, as opposed to (i.e.) the Allston work being done at the same time as a project at North Station.
Its actually baseless NIMBY'ism. If people truly opposed these projects they wouldn't get built and Mahtty Walsh would have gotten turfed for some anti development loon. NIMBY's always claim near universal support from everyone who's not a developer or construction worker but recent elections have proven that assumption to be false.

As far as disruptions go, shit happens. I've used the T for almost 30 years now and I'm not worried about it. Your commute is far more likely to be delayed by a crappy signal system or broken down trains than construction above the tracks.
 

navigator4

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Practically speaking aren't the two projects happening in sequence, not simultaneously?

Seems that the South Station Tower is about to break ground, and I suspect the worst disruption will be during the first year or so.

Straightening the Pike is no where close to breaking ground. I suspect we will still be arguing about configuration options five years from now.

However, lesser Pike and rail disruptions near Boylston Street (air rights) are likely to happen at the same time as the South Station Tower.
I hope the state gets smart and makes the developers disrupt traffic for all projects at one time. Last year, Pike traffic was disrupted for construction and now its going to again for the air rights project and then for the rebuild. Why can't all construction be done simultaneously rather than torture commuters over a multi year period?
 

Equilibria

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I hope the state gets smart and makes the developers disrupt traffic for all projects at one time. Last year, Pike traffic was disrupted for construction and now its going to again for the air rights project and then for the rebuild. Why can't all construction be done simultaneously rather than torture commuters over a multi year period?
The plan was to have the Parcel 12, 13, and 15 projects all disrupt simultaneously, before the 1000 Boylston developer canceled and blew up the plan. I don't know whether Fenway Center and Parcel 12 will still be synchronized, much less the Viola at Parcel 13, but there has been attention paid to this before.

As a more general point: life in a dynamic city means constant disruption somewhere. MassDOT is also reconfiguring the I-90/I-495 Interchange in the next couple of years for those out that way, and that will be disruptive. GLX is very disruptive. The Charles Circle work will be disruptive, followed hopefully by the also-disruptive Red Blue Connector. Hub on Causeway has been disruptive at North Station.

You're either disrupting or stagnating. Fortunately, Boston is starting to disrupt itself for long-term benefit.
 

citydweller

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kmp1284's statement is very reasonable, however, because both South Station and the Pike carry commuters largely from the West & South West. Creating delays in both at once will exacerbate issues for the same commuting population, as opposed to (i.e.) the Allston work being done at the same time as a project at North Station.
For the most part, they are distantly different commuters, especially those from the South. I really believe that the SST project will have minimal impact. The Mass Pike project, unfortunately, could be a commuter hell.
 

Equilibria

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Two takeaways from that presentation:

- The platform circulation space will actually increase during construction. The Globe needs to stop scaring people.
- I don't mind this building, but jeez, could we at least have considered the architect from Toronto? (It's WilkinsonEyre - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CIBC_Square).

FWIW, I've always appreciated that the last render there includes window shades and less-than-ideal lighting. It's probably pretty close to a real prediction.
 

DZH22

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I wonder which tower people will end up liking better, between this one and Winthrop Square. They're both chunky and clunky in their own ways, that's for sure. It's like a hallmark of mixed used buildings to look a little bit messy. I do expect quality cladding out of both towers, which has really been a saving grace for Boston at the skyline level, especially compared to some other booming cities. (examples Toronto, Miami, Seattle, Austin, Vancouver, Montreal, Los Angeles.... specifically the residential boom components)
 

DZH22

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^^^You have a lot of your heights wrong but I share the sentiment for sure.

What's crazy is that if this building was built in 2015 it would have been Boston's 3rd tallest, but by the time it's up it will only be 6th!
 

Pend978

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I think One Congress is the biggest game changer in terms of street level and the skyline. It will really bring the west end and downtown together to make it look like one continuous cluster. Taking in to account what was there before and the development as a whole, it really is amazing.
 

DZH22

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^^^Nice list, it's going to be a huge difference going from 614' in THIRD place to 677' in SIXTH place. The skyline is "leveling up" right in front of us.

I do have 1 point of contention. #14 is NOT another building and will never count as another building. The second wing appears to be fully connected for 25 floors. It doesn't matter that they split off after that point, even though they still have the glass bridge connections. Fully sharing the first 25 floors means it's the same building. If you want to think that you are providing us with the most accurate information possible, then cut it out already.
 
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meddlepal

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Oh look we're posting lists of buildings again. Can the mods start aggregating these posts somewhere and get us back on track?
 

kmp1284

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all "large scale development projects" which created services and features you and others who "live in or spend considerable amounts of time in Boston" appreciate and make use of on a regular basis -- the subway; the infill and land reclamation that created haymarket, the south end, back bay, the west end, etc.; the big dig; *any* multi-use/public-use development (public garden, emerald necklace, the pike); *any* large common-use development (fenway park, symphony hall, td garden, MFA, prudential center) -- caused some degree of inconvenience during their times of development/construction.

so what's your take, here? so long as developments that you make use of and appreciate were constructed and dealt with before you lived in town and had to worry about a potential wrinkle to your commute-time, then you're cool with it -- but if you may have to budget your train ride to work differently for a couple years in order to create something that will greatly enhance the public good for decades to come, then it's an intollerable offense?

entitled much?
There’s a big difference between major public works projects like the filling of the Back Bay, Big Dig, etc. that have benefited the entire city and region and a clunky and generic office tower marring one of Boston’s best buildings from an architectural standpoint with the ancillary "benefits" being years of inconvenienced commuters and residents and a congestion-inducing parking garage and a bus terminal that'll probably smell like piss within six months of opening.
 

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