8-10 Waldo Street | Coolidge Corner | Brookline

Beton Brut

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Re: 8-10 Waldo Street Coolidge Corner Brookline

This proposal has all the markings of an April Fools prank.

Though not a great work of architecture, something along the lines of the Courtyard Marriott on Webster would be more suitable and in keeping with the fabric and character ob Coolidge Corner.
 

KentXie

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Re: 8-10 Waldo Street Coolidge Corner Brookline

Honestly, I hope this project goes through only because Brookline has been literally the only municipal bordering Boston's core that have not done a single thing to densify and do it's part to relieve the housing crunch in the area. Just take a look at google map and see how urbanized Cambridge, Somerville, Everett, Chelsea, Medford, Revere, Watertown, and Quincy are and then there's freaking Brookline sticking out like a green sore thumb. Build it.
 

FK4

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Re: 8-10 Waldo Street Coolidge Corner Brookline

Honestly, I hope this project goes through only because Brookline has been literally the only municipal bordering Boston's core that have not done a single thing to densify and do it's part to relieve the housing crunch in the area. Just take a look at google map and see how urbanized Cambridge, Somerville, Everett, Chelsea, Medford, Revere, Watertown, and Quincy are and then there's freaking Brookline sticking out like a green sore thumb. Build it.
Whatever, context is important. There are also plenty of midrise turds in north Brookline. Either way, Brookline doesn't "owe" the city anything. AND it was always lower density than most of municipalities you just names, and partly because it never filled up with industry like every place else... And I am very thankful for that.

The area of Waldo Street could do with a small building in the middle and that's it. The place to build up Coolidge is Webster (already built up), Centre Street (rezoning and allowing some demo of some of the proximal Victorians would be OK, at least by me), and Beacon Street. Harvard is nice being low rise and it should stay that way. This is a sleazy developer and this proposal couldn't be more ridiculous, ugly, and downright insulting. If anything screams greedy profiteering, this is it.
 

tysmith95

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Re: 8-10 Waldo Street Coolidge Corner Brookline

^Brookline has low density because it's a snobby town with strict zoning regulations. If they actually joined Boston in 1873 I believe that it would be much denser than it is today. In order for the Boston area to be more affordable cities like Brookline need to build their fair share of housing. Frankly they haven't been so I agree with Kent.

But yes I agree that this proposal is meh.
 

odurandina

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Re: 8-10 Waldo Street Coolidge Corner Brookline

^^Yes. A small portion of Brookline should become part of Boston (or all of it). But if they're willing to add some density down there, i say keep the brick, tudor, grass, swamp, duckweed, Eliot Little Field + Playground for eternity. Treasures. Every city needs more Brookline. ...in any case, i'll bet this tower will be very good living inside. just sayin. Still, it's disappointing an architect would be so far off the mark.
 

JeffDowntown

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Re: 8-10 Waldo Street Coolidge Corner Brookline

^Brookline has low density because it's a snobby town with strict zoning regulations. If they actually joined Boston in 1873 I believe that it would be much denser than it is today. In order for the Boston area to be more affordable cities like Brookline need to build their fair share of housing. Frankly they haven't been so I agree with Kent.

But yes I agree that this proposal is meh.
Brookline is not exactly "low density" at 8,649 people per square mile, 10th densest city/town in the state.

Somerville is the densest city/town in the state, and it is not populated with buildings like this. Density does not require monstrosities.
 

Justin7

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When did Anna's become Boca Grande?

Agree with everyone saying density here is good but the design is shit.
 

FK4

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And that's very impressive, given that the majority of Brookline - the part farther from the urban core - is quite suburban. The part of brookline near Coolidge Corner is very dense, with many mid rise buildings. Brookline, for its size, has a lot of affordable housing options as well as a very good town assistance program for first time buyers before a certain income bracket. It also has much more than it's share of mental health group homes. It gets tiresome hearing sour grapes people rant about brooklines snobbery on here, and expectations that it somehow "owes" something that isn't being given. Yes, itv a wealthy town overall and more and more so, and there is some snobbery that comes along with that. That being said, most people I know who visit Brookline immediately love it for its unique character and pleasant blend of urban and low density. Developments like this are exactly what draw people to the area.

Another thing: if you live in Brookline, your kids usually get to walk to school. As the population increases, that is changing., since the local elementary schools can't necessarily accommodate all of the local children. The town is going to have to build another school, and soon. But as it stands right now every time there is another large development, that directly affects the size and quality of public education which is probably the biggest single reason that families move to this town. It also affects what elementary school the existing people on a certain street can send their kids to, and whether or not the trip to school is a bus ride or a short walk. That affects property values since not all schools are created equal and the ability to walk your kid to school, a good school, is a huge, huge plus for most people.. Do you think I'm kidding? The development at Hancock Village, if built, would force many local people in South Brookline to have to have their kids bussed over to Heath.

I also get annoyed by many of the commenters on here who I am pretty sure don't have children of their own, nor do they own property, casting huge aspersions without actually having put much thought into seeing things from other people's perspective (and full disclosure: I don't live in Brookline anymore, I support dense development, don't own and don't have kids). There is a lot more subtlety to these questions then just kicking and screaming about snobbery and wanting to bulldoze and force people you resent for no good reason to accept ugly tall buildings in the wrong locations.
 

Justin7

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^So build another school.

There are too many people. They need to live somewhere. If we don't increase density in/near cities and on transit lines what is the alternative?

I'm with you on the snob comments though. No need for that.
 

Bergeron37

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I thought Brookline was going to build another school on the Stop & Shop site?
 

Shepard

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Article mentioned another residential project at the Holiday Inn. First I'd heard of that. I'd heard if the neena's proposal before but into this one. Anyone?
 

FK4

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It didn't. Anna's was never located there. And Boca Grande is gone now.
And now the Beacon Anna's is something else, too. Boca went downhill over the last several years, I wont miss them.

Article mentioned another residential project at the Holiday Inn. First I'd heard of that. I'd heard if the neena's proposal before but into this one. Anyone?
https://www.therealreporter.com/briefs/2739

Nothing planned yet, as far as I know. But it was sold.


I thought Brookline was going to build another school on the Stop & Shop site?
No final plans on school location, as far as the most recent news I've heard. They've explored a number of sites and all have their drawbacks. I think what seems to be the most likely plan is to build another school right next to Baker.

Edit- actually, they chose the old Baldwin school. geographically, makes sense.
http://brookline.wickedlocal.com/news/20161206/brooklines-ninth-school-building-committee-selected
 
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GW

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And now the Beacon Anna's is something else, too. Boca went downhill over the last several years, I wont miss them.
Beacon Anna's is definitely still there. (I live across the street and nab 11PM burritos far too often.) I've heard good things about Los Amigos (the place that replaced Boca) but I haven't been there yet. IMO, Dorado is the best Mexican in the area.


About this project: density is good, but as others have pointed out, this part of Brookline is very dense already, and the design is garbage. Something a bit shorter, with contextual brick work, would be my preference. It's been a while since I've been there so I could be wrong but I think the I-9 corridor west of Brookline Village might be the best opportunity to add density. I definitely wouldn't start tearing down houses on Centre St, which already has some high-rises near its intersection with Beacon.
 
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FK4

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^good news about the Anna's. I was misinformed!
 

jpdivola

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Re: 8-10 Waldo Street Coolidge Corner Brookline

Brookline is not exactly "low density" at 8,649 people per square mile, 10th densest city/town in the state.

Somerville is the densest city/town in the state, and it is not populated with buildings like this. Density does not require monstrosities.
I agree with you that, in theory, Brookline could be made much denser if large sections of the town were knocked down and rebuilt with densely packed tripple-deckers and small walkups. But realistically, what is the probability of that? IMO, we need to acknowledge that large scale redevelopment of the town's vernacular is unlikely for a variety of political, financial, and logistical reasons.

Given that comprehensive town wide redevelopment won't happen, IMO we should funnel housing growth into key "urban villages" and make the most of the small minority of lots that are realistically up for redevelopment. That leads me to support projects like this. Even though I 100% agree the design needs to be reworked.
 

odurandina

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About this project: density is good, but as others have pointed out, this part of Brookline is very dense already, and the design is garbage. Something a bit shorter, with contextual brick work, would be my preference....
 

mvulch

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Just my opinion here, but art deco style/color scheme reminds me too much of the brutalist buildings already on Beacon. Not sure how anyone ever saw any of the below buildings as tasteful or appealing. Time for something more modern looking that fits within the context of the neighborhood.

133 Park (Beacon Park)


1731 Beacon


1501 Beacon
 

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