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castevens

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Don't apologize for the long post! I appreciate it greatly! Thanks for the info, I'll write more later
 

castevens

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Great, once again thanks for the information! I passed it on to her, and she appreciates it too. Question: Which schools (and is NU one of them) average LSAT scores as opposed to taking the top score?

Also, what was your undergrad major? I don't know if you already mentioned it, ill check
 
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Patrick

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castevens said:
Great, once again thanks for the information! I passed it on to her, and she appreciates it too. Question: Which schools (and is NU one of them) average LSAT scores as opposed to taking the top score?

Also, what was your undergrad major? I don't know if you already mentioned it, ill check
I began pre-medical. I will admit it was too much of a challenge, and thats why I switched. I transferred into the political science program (keep in mind this was right after september 11, which happened my senior year in HS) and I was psyched to change the world. found out that was kind of looked upon by most people as a fluff major, so i picked up economics as a second major, with history as my minor. so for the longest time i was a double major in economics and political science, minoring in history. unfortunately since i switched too late i was unable to complete all of my economics courses and consequently i ended up with a double-minor in history and economics with political science as my major. thats a long answer but i had to stress it for my own sanity because to say i was a political science major doesnt do my course list justice...i am only TWO courses short of an economics major (and they could have been easy electives, i took all the hard stuff)!!! it really bugs me sometimes. but anyway, to give you an idea of what my transcript looked like, it was filled with mostly courses from pols, econ, and hst subjects. But I know plenty of people with history as their majors who have gotten into top name schools.

and on the averaging part, this varies by institution but most schools take an average score. one that sticks out in my mind that does not do this is the University of Pittsburgh, and I think Catholic University in Washington DC may also take the highest of the two or three scores. anyhow, the best idea is to do your best the first time around, which makes worrying about such things un-needed and which allows you to have free time to do your apps and stuff without worrying more about that damn test. take it earlier, she'll feel more relaxed over the summer as she heads into the fall in which she will apply. if you have any additional questions feel free to ask me because as of right now i am unemployed (lots of free time), bored, and just went through this whole process not even 6 months ago.. it is a very stressful time but there is light at the end of the tunnel haha.
 

bosdevelopment

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Patrick said:
castevens said:
Great, once again thanks for the information! I passed it on to her, and she appreciates it too. Question: Which schools (and is NU one of them) average LSAT scores as opposed to taking the top score?

Also, what was your undergrad major? I don't know if you already mentioned it, ill check
I began pre-medical. I will admit it was too much of a challenge, and thats why I switched. I transferred into the political science program (keep in mind this was right after september 11, which happened my senior year in HS) and I was psyched to change the world. found out that was kind of looked upon by most people as a fluff major, so i picked up economics as a second major, with history as my minor. so for the longest time i was a double major in economics and political science, minoring in history. unfortunately since i switched too late i was unable to complete all of my economics courses and consequently i ended up with a double-minor in history and economics with political science as my major. thats a long answer but i had to stress it for my own sanity because to say i was a political science major doesnt do my course list justice...i am only TWO courses short of an economics major (and they could have been easy electives, i took all the hard stuff)!!! it really bugs me sometimes. but anyway, to give you an idea of what my transcript looked like, it was filled with mostly courses from pols, econ, and hst subjects. But I know plenty of people with history as their majors who have gotten into top name schools.

and on the averaging part, this varies by institution but most schools take an average score. one that sticks out in my mind that does not do this is the University of Pittsburgh, and I think Catholic University in Washington DC may also take the highest of the two or three scores. anyhow, the best idea is to do your best the first time around, which makes worrying about such things un-needed and which allows you to have free time to do your apps and stuff without worrying more about that damn test. take it earlier, she'll feel more relaxed over the summer as she heads into the fall in which she will apply. if you have any additional questions feel free to ask me because as of right now i am unemployed (lots of free time), bored, and just went through this whole process not even 6 months ago.. it is a very stressful time but there is light at the end of the tunnel haha.
I know several top law grads from suffolk and northeastern that can not find a job period. They would be willing to take anything at this point. Your estimate of 125k is something in the harvard grad range.
 
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bosdevelopment said:
Patrick said:
castevens said:
Great, once again thanks for the information! I passed it on to her, and she appreciates it too. Question: Which schools (and is NU one of them) average LSAT scores as opposed to taking the top score?

Also, what was your undergrad major? I don't know if you already mentioned it, ill check
I began pre-medical. I will admit it was too much of a challenge, and thats why I switched. I transferred into the political science program (keep in mind this was right after september 11, which happened my senior year in HS) and I was psyched to change the world. found out that was kind of looked upon by most people as a fluff major, so i picked up economics as a second major, with history as my minor. so for the longest time i was a double major in economics and political science, minoring in history. unfortunately since i switched too late i was unable to complete all of my economics courses and consequently i ended up with a double-minor in history and economics with political science as my major. thats a long answer but i had to stress it for my own sanity because to say i was a political science major doesnt do my course list justice...i am only TWO courses short of an economics major (and they could have been easy electives, i took all the hard stuff)!!! it really bugs me sometimes. but anyway, to give you an idea of what my transcript looked like, it was filled with mostly courses from pols, econ, and hst subjects. But I know plenty of people with history as their majors who have gotten into top name schools.

and on the averaging part, this varies by institution but most schools take an average score. one that sticks out in my mind that does not do this is the University of Pittsburgh, and I think Catholic University in Washington DC may also take the highest of the two or three scores. anyhow, the best idea is to do your best the first time around, which makes worrying about such things un-needed and which allows you to have free time to do your apps and stuff without worrying more about that damn test. take it earlier, she'll feel more relaxed over the summer as she heads into the fall in which she will apply. if you have any additional questions feel free to ask me because as of right now i am unemployed (lots of free time), bored, and just went through this whole process not even 6 months ago.. it is a very stressful time but there is light at the end of the tunnel haha.
I know several top law grads from suffolk and northeastern that can not find a job period. They would be willing to take anything at this point. Your estimate of 125k is something in the harvard grad range.
well it could be the case that at the moment the market is saturated with lawyers in boston...however, the 125k/year estimate was not my own, it is the general estimate of the schools themselves, and is widely known as the standard figure for most national institutions. let me find an example.
 

castevens

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Congrats, BosDev! You broke the ice as the first non-castevens/Patrick poster in this thread!
 
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Patrick

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Here is a link for Boston College Law school statistics (I was rejected, my top choice). if you scroll down it will say that 98% were employed X months after graduation and the median salary of those surveyed was $125k/year. although the median and mean can be misleading, this is a statistic that I have seen over and over again for most grads of top law schools. the school i will be attending is not a top tier school and the median is around $50k/year, but a place like suffolk where most grads will work in high paying mass jobs should have around 125k/year. you said you graduated in 2000 from BU, meaning if you have friends your own age who are new lawyers they would have only been practiving for three years, maybe even less if they took time off. might this have something to do with their troubles? also, class rank matters to top firms in big cities like boston...perhaps they were not in the top 1/3 of their class?
 

bosdevelopment

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These schools blow a lot of hot air about the average salaries upon graduation. My advice: get a job as early as possible and take it as seriously, if not more seriously than your classes. Without experience nobody's going to be willing to hire you.
 

castevens

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My sister is in that limbo right now. All of the jobs that she wants in her field (landscape architecture) require 3-10 years of job experience. But how do you get that experience if every place requires at least 3? Shes pretty much looking for exceptions right now.
 

bosdevelopment

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Patrick said:
Here is a link for Boston College Law school statistics (I was rejected, my top choice). if you scroll down it will say that 98% were employed X months after graduation and the median salary of those surveyed was $125k/year. although the median and mean can be misleading, this is a statistic that I have seen over and over again for most grads of top law schools. the school i will be attending is not a top tier school and the median is around $50k/year, but a place like suffolk where most grads will work in high paying mass jobs should have around 125k/year. you said you graduated in 2000 from BU, meaning if you have friends your own age who are new lawyers they would have only been practiving for three years, maybe even less if they took time off. might this have something to do with their troubles? also, class rank matters to top firms in big cities like boston...perhaps they were not in the top 1/3 of their class?
Two of my buddies that went to BU graduated suffolk law in the top 10%. Another was in the 19th percentile at Northeastern. None have been able to hold a job (one not even finding one) since last May (over a year). They didn't work during school, and this is undoubtedly what hurt them but 125k is a pipe dream.
 
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Patrick

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bosdevelopment said:
These schools blow a lot of hot air about the average salaries upon graduation. My advice: get a job as early as possible and take it as seriously, if not more seriously than your classes. Without experience nobody's going to be willing to hire you.
you are exactly right. academic learning translates into nothing in the real world, it is experience that really counts. however, what it does do is signal to your employers that you can learn skills on the job, so in that sense, everytime you hear a kid say "when am i ever going to use this stuff" the answer is: never. Northeastern U school of law has an excellent program where instead of classes all three years you spend most of your time learning hands on in boston's top firms for credit...and sometimes pay. the top paid NUSL student last year was making 2k/week but i think they said he was an exception and he also put in way more hours than normal....but anyway, point is, you are right about the experience stuff so your advice should not be brushed aside, i have heard numerous people say the same thing.
 

castevens

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Northeastern U school of law has an excellent program where instead of classes all three years you spend most of your time learning hands on in boston's top firms for credit
Nicknamed "Co-Op" or Cooperative Learning. I'm on Co-Op with Brooks Pharmacy right now. I have applied to Mass General Hospital for my second Co-Op coming this upcoming spring
 
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Patrick

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bosdevelopment said:
Patrick said:
Here is a link for Boston College Law school statistics (I was rejected, my top choice). if you scroll down it will say that 98% were employed X months after graduation and the median salary of those surveyed was $125k/year. although the median and mean can be misleading, this is a statistic that I have seen over and over again for most grads of top law schools. the school i will be attending is not a top tier school and the median is around $50k/year, but a place like suffolk where most grads will work in high paying mass jobs should have around 125k/year. you said you graduated in 2000 from BU, meaning if you have friends your own age who are new lawyers they would have only been practiving for three years, maybe even less if they took time off. might this have something to do with their troubles? also, class rank matters to top firms in big cities like boston...perhaps they were not in the top 1/3 of their class?
Two of my buddies that went to BU graduated suffolk law in the top 10%. Another was in the 19th percentile at Northeastern. None have been able to hold a job (one not even finding one) since last May (over a year). They didn't work during school, and this is undoubtedly what hurt them but 125k is a pipe dream.

I could be mistaken but I think you have to work during school at northeastern, i think its part (a big part) of the curriculum. also, did you mean he was in the top 19%, or 19th percentile?

also, 125k/year is in the private sector, and many people choose to go into the public sector, which is lower paying. BC law grads get extremely high salaries. for instance, when I was at UVM I had a work-study job in the general counsel's office (UVM attorneys office) and the guy i worked for was a BC law grad. at my school you could look up on the internet the salary of any faculty or staff member. i looked him up. he made $88,000/year and we are talking about a 39,000 person town in northern vermont.
 

Ron Newman

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Attention, Admin:

Could you please move the "Big Dig Tunnel Collapse" thread out of New Development, and into Transit and Infrastructure where it belongs?
 

Waldorf

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ATTN ADMIN

ATTENTION ADMIN,

HOW DO I CHANGE MY NAME? Or does that require legal action?

I now want to be known as Waldorf.
 

castevens

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No but you can be Cat Stevens. But then again, you can't even be that. You'd have to settle for Yusef Islam if you wanted that...

:)
 

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