Congestion toll in Boston?

F-Line to Dudley

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I don't see a zipper working on I-90. I-90 does seem to get more reverse traffic and less peak direction traffic than I-93.
The 93 zipper NEVER worked. By cannibalizing what little shoulder space was left on a grandfathered interstate, stuffing the zipper barrier on the existing footprint wrecked what extremely small resiliency the highway had to withstand a disablement. It locks like it does every hour of every goddamn day because there is absolutely nowhere to weave around when traffic flow sustains a flesh wound. The highway would literally be improved by just getting rid of the zipper and re-claiming what little continuous shoulder space they can grab, but the only way it's going to be fixed at tangible improvement to traffic flow is by a billion-dollar Braintree Split-Southampton St. widening project that adds no lane capacity whatsoever but merely buffs out full Interstate-spec left and right shoulders through every bridge and overpass like vastly more resilient 128 now has. With the Pike, it already gets banged up daily by its lack of continuous breakdown lane inside of 128, though the road itself is much straighter than 93 so disablements don't yet bite traffic flow as hard as they do on the SE Expressway. But I can only imagine how awful it would be if you took what little shoulder remained and made a zippah out of it.

In Boston the only way a managed lane add is going to work completely trouble-free is if the pavement space allowances are akin to the sprawling I-84/I-91 carriageways east and north of Hartford: everything having full-width shoulders, including the HOV reservation. That's not construction we have any space to do in this region, certainly not for the dubious overall benefits of HOV's.
 
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DominusNovus

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The 93 zipper NEVER worked. By cannibalizing what little shoulder space was left on a grandfathered interstate, stuffing the zipper barrier on the existing footprint wrecked what extremely small resiliency the highway had to withstand a disablement. It locks like it does every hour of every goddamn day because there is absolutely nowhere to weave around when traffic flow sustains a flesh wound. The highway would literally be improved by just getting rid of the zipper and re-claiming what little continuous shoulder space they can grab, but the only way it's going to be fixed at tangible improvement to traffic flow is by a billion-dollar Braintree Split-Southampton St. widening project that adds no lane capacity whatsoever but merely buffs out full Interstate-spec left and right shoulders through every bridge and overpass like vastly more resilient 128 now has. With the Pike, it already gets banged up daily by its lack of continuous breakdown lane inside of 128, though the road itself is much straighter than 93 so disablements don't yet bite traffic flow as hard as they do on the SE Expressway. But I can only imagine how awful it would be if you took what little shoulder remained and made a zippah out of it.

In Boston the only way a managed lane add is going to work completely trouble-free is if the pavement space allowances are akin to the sprawling I-84/I-91 carriageways east and north of Hartford: everything having full-width shoulders, including the HOV reservation. That's not construction we have any space to do in this region, certainly not for the dubious overall benefits of HOV's.
Double liked. The commute time in from even as close as Quincy is absurd, and the zipper punishes you for moving your commute out of rush hour.
 

vanshnookenraggen

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Money is fungible, right?
Union pensions are a totally separate budget, like operating costs. Most don't understand this.

The problem with capital projects at the MTA is that there is often graft between the public workers and private contractors. The contractor (or straight up mob member) will ask that a certain truck with certain material be "lost" and the union worker will look the other way when it's driven off the lot. The IG has been cracking down on this so it usually isn't as bad as, say, Goodfellas. So with the congestion pricing money there does need to be more accountability. This is certainly tough with any bureaucracy but with Cuomo's MTA it more likely means it will allow him to build what he wants with the contractors he chooses. Supposedly there is a restructuring going to happen so that capital projects are more transparent. We will have to wait and see on this.
 

Arlington

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The point of the lockbox is to directly answer the reflex assertion that "they" will not spend it to improve work commutes for people who work in the zone but live outside it. Whether any metro area can effectively spend $ to improve transit is a separate question.

If there's no lockbox, the odds of improving transit are negative (it gets more crowded), and opponents can charge that the money will be "wasted" and "not help the people"

With a lockbox, you've done everything from a revenue side to ensure that the money is spent where "fairness" demands. Then it is a separate question of will the unions/contractors rip it off.

For NYC the answer is that they get about 1/4th the amount of mobility per capital dollar versus other high cost cities around the world (Paris, London), ripped off by the union-contractor-political syndicate.

For Boston the answer is more hopeful: We'd hope that Baker's intervention on the GLX--which stopped what was essentially $1b worth of contractor ripoff--says that Boston will spend its $ about as well as London has.
 

Arlington

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NYC's success will be a model for Boston.

Of a total 51.5b plan (including LIRR) essentially a third of it is made possible by a projected $15b from congestion tolling

Or you could say that the plan for the NYC subway is 37% bigger than it would have been without a congestion toll.

The promise in Boston will be: "Just as in NYC, the congestion toll will both speed downtown traffic *and* fund alternatives that make it easier to not drive"

 

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