Design a Better Malden

ant8904

Active Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
608
Reaction score
2
For/if anyone is interested in hearing about the committee. I just went and came back. It turns out that it was an interview. They asked me a few general questions like what areas are like what are the most walkable area (I said areas around Oak Grove and that Waitts Mount) and least walkable (Riverside and the areas near Route 60 in Malden Square). They also ask a few other things like how much do I think can be accomplished in a year and how to best sell walkability to Malden.

Hopefully they like my answers well enough, but in hindsight, I feel I could have answer question like selling to Malden and accomplishment a bit better. Also for a person who went through so many job interviews not too long ago, I feel I should be more comfortable on the fly too.

Apparently, despite being in the middle of the work day, they are interviewing 11 people just this one day. I hope I will get in, but I have to admit it looks a bit more competitive and difficult than I thought.
 

fatnoah

New member
Joined
Aug 28, 2012
Messages
71
Reaction score
10
My advice to anyone who wants to improve downtown Malden: go a couple miles up the road and look at downtown Melrose. They're doing it right.
I agree. Every time I drive through the area or cruise by on the Orange Line, I think about what a dynamic area it could be. With it's convergence of bus routes, Orange Line and Commuter Rail, it generates plenty of foot traffic. Unfortunately, there's not coherent plan or walkable business district such as exists in areas such as Melrose or Winchester.

My only complaint for Melrose's downtown is the parking. There are enough spaces, but the parking is fragmented and it can take time to find free spots during prime times. Malden Center seems to have decent, centralized parking that could serve a revitalized business district.
 

statler

Senior Member
Joined
May 25, 2006
Messages
7,798
Reaction score
188
Melrose is built in a traditional (and almost wholly intact) Main St layout.

Malden has two main squares and is bisected by a major 4-6 lane artery. Also much of Malden's cohesiveness has been razed in the name of 50's urban renewal.

There are still some intact blocks but they mostly separated by some sort suburban design element (highway, massive lawn, parking garage, RT128 Style office building, etc)

It would take an incredibly large scale redevelopment of downtown to really knit it back together to get anything like the pedestrian friendly, human-scale of downtown Melrose.
 

ant8904

Active Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2008
Messages
608
Reaction score
2
I presume the 4-6 lane artery is Rt 60?

That highway makes no sense to me. From both sides are regular 2 lane roads and it handle all traffic just fine. Somehow, some genius have the idea that approaching the town center and just the town center would somehow spawn cars out of nowhere giving a need for a 4-line divided highway.

Somehow for just for 1 mile only, Rt 60 needs to be a 4 lane highway where everything before and after is a regular road and nothing really feeding the road to have more volume.
 

Arlington

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Dec 10, 2011
Messages
4,463
Reaction score
578
Reviving an old thread with the right topic.

The Malden River Greenway project is a recreation-and-resiliency project along the Malden river between Wellington and Malden Ceneter:


There's a survey available for "how should we redesign the Malden River waterfront" which will ask about this concept:




Image
Malden River Works is creating a community-driven design for Malden’s new waterfront park. Thank you for everyone who has joined us for the three public meetings and shared your opinions.

Now we want to hear from you again! Please take 10 minutes to tell us how the design of the new park along the River can reflect the rich and diverse communities, stories and cultures of Malden.

We are proposing “Celebrate Malden” as an explicit design goal and invite you to share your thoughts in this brief survey.
Tell us what you think by July 14, 2020.
 

Vagabond

Active Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Messages
190
Reaction score
296
I'm all for parks... but this seems like a weird investment. It's in the middle of the industrial section of the river, and nowhere near any daily traffic. It's too small to be a sports facility outside of the rowing center. What draws people to this park instead of the bigger one 1 block away at Rivers Edge?

I suppose this is the low-hanging fruit to a much larger investment, but would have expected the first effort would just be building the riverfront path, then invest in activities once the connectivity is established. A 3-mile circuit is the perfect distance for bringing daily walkers, runners and bikers.

Even the sections without easements have been ordered to open up the waterfront to a pathway.

1594387145334.png
.
1594387847922.png

1594388236287.png
 

Top