"Dirty Old Boston"

Scott

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The government is and was unresponsive to urban America's needs. There was local corruption but Boston was not alone in its decline. The cities make the money and (until recently) the senator from Kentucky dictates how it is spent. That's the current problem and the past problem was largely a variation of that.
 

tocoto

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Agree that the federal and state governments do have lots of often negative impacts on cities. My opinion is local citizens and local leaders (I no longer live in Boston) have an opportunity now because of Boston's current economic strength to seize the day and achieve better architecture and urban development than has been the case in the past 100 years, and we are seeing some promising signs that the city and the older nearby cities might be starting to move in more progressive directions.
 

Life Coach Mike

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Sure, but the grit and grime would have gentrified had it survived the hollowing out of Urban Renewal. It would surely be more vibrant today if it had survived than as it stands.
A total lack of imagination at the time. Perhaps 20 years later and the success of Quincy Market would have pulled this area along. Sad.
 

393b40

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Oh that's an awesome photo. Never seen that angle before.

On the topic of "Boston what if", this is why cities, history, and the unknown future are fun and interesting. I think it's fascinating that we're just living through a small percentage of Boston's life as a city. I'd love to see what Boston, and several other cities around the world look like 100, 500 and 1000 years from now.
 

Scott

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The picture seems to be dated 1925 but the flood was 1919
 

BronsonShore

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The molasses tank was located right on the water, where those ballfields and pool are located now. There's a plaque there.
 

kz1000ps

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shmessy

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Yeah, that doesn't seem to be the Molasses Tank given all that. Good info all, thanks folks!
 

DBM

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Can't believe we lost all the buildings on the right and got this in exchange: 2 Bromfield St - Google Maps
Yep, 350 Washington St. is a notably fugly building, and it's a shame. That said, I think it's worth pointing out how many buildings from that excellent picture have been preserved:

294 Washington
330 Washington
Old South Meeting House
1 Milk
1 Water

And, though 1 Winter St. (aka the Corner Mall) predecessor got demolished, its replacement, built in 1925, is a few years away from turning 100.

I imagine many CBDs of similar vintage to Boston are far, far worse in terms of how little of their pre-1920s architecture was preserved.

(although in the case of every great German, Dutch, Polish, Austrian, and western Russian/Ukranian city, plus the Balkans, you can literally blame Hitler)
 

squidman1

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Why is it that every time I try to look for vintage Boston photos on Flickr, I get bombarded with rather lewd search results? It gets really annoying.
 

#bancars

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Not sure if this is the perfect thread for this, but this Globe piece traces a bit of the modern history and changes of Kenmore Square, from the 70s to the present. A few good photos!

 

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