General MBTA Topics (Multi Modal, Budget, MassDOT)

bakgwailo

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The City of Boston has existed for hundreds of years in a climate where winters killed off almost half the original colonists in Plymouth - weather (and winters specifically) suck in New England and it isn't anything new. By default public transit, especially HRT/subways should have stations designed for the comfort of passengers by default; it shouldn't need any other justification and should be the normal. Ensuring your customers aren't exposed to the elements while waiting to use your services is a pretty low bar to meet.
 
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as02143

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The City of Boston has existed for hundreds of years in a climate where winters killed off almost half the original colonists in Plymouth - weather (and winters specifically) suck in New England and it isn't anything new. By default public transit, especially HRT/subways should have stations designed for the comfort of passengers by default; it shouldn't need any other justification and should be the normal. Ensuring your customers aren't exposed to the elements while waiting to use your services is a pretty low bar to meet.
As the Dutch say, you're not made of sugar.
 

Stlin

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Out of curiosity, is there any real reason we don't regularly park trains at stations overnight rather than at yards? Obviously you have less slack for startup, you have to get operators to each station, maint access etc, but it can't be impossible to do to some degree. That would allow for smaller end of line yards or fleet expansion beyond yard capacity.

Same thing with buses. We're told that the MBTA bus fleet is constrained by yard/garage capacity. Why not park a few in busways overnight?
 

jklo

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Out of curiosity, is there any real reason we don't regularly park trains at stations overnight rather than at yards? Obviously you have less slack for startup, you have to get operators to each station, maint access etc, but it can't be impossible to do to some degree. That would allow for smaller end of line yards or fleet expansion beyond yard capacity.

Same thing with buses. We're told that the MBTA bus fleet is constrained by yard/garage capacity. Why not park a few in busways overnight?
Vandalism?
 

HelloBostonHi

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Out of curiosity, is there any real reason we don't regularly park trains at stations overnight rather than at yards? Obviously you have less slack for startup, you have to get operators to each station, maint access etc, but it can't be impossible to do to some degree. That would allow for smaller end of line yards or fleet expansion beyond yard capacity.

Same thing with buses. We're told that the MBTA bus fleet is constrained by yard/garage capacity. Why not park a few in busways overnight?
I imagine it mostly comes to getting operators to the vehicles. Do operators just park around the stations all day? Especially for downtown stations I can't see that working great... And then at the end of their shifts they would have to be paid until they are returned to their starting station, which adds more deadhead pay
 

stefal

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Out of curiosity, is there any real reason we don't regularly park trains at stations overnight rather than at yards? Obviously you have less slack for startup, you have to get operators to each station, maint access etc, but it can't be impossible to do to some degree. That would allow for smaller end of line yards or fleet expansion beyond yard capacity.

Same thing with buses. We're told that the MBTA bus fleet is constrained by yard/garage capacity. Why not park a few in busways overnight?
I imagine it mostly comes to getting operators to the vehicles. Do operators just park around the stations all day? Especially for downtown stations I can't see that working great... And then at the end of their shifts they would have to be paid until they are returned to their starting station, which adds more deadhead pay
In addition, trains parked in the stations would be an immediate road/"track" block to any work being done in the tunnels and stations. They are normally as clear as possible for overnight track work and system maintenance. Even with no revenue or non-revenue trains in the way, it's a very orchestrated performance each night to get the right materials, equipment, and personnel out and working in the very short amount of time they have to perform work...
 

BeyondRevenue

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