Hobson's Landing | Aloft Hotel | 383 Commercial Street | Portland

Cosakita18

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but with Phase 2 under construction...that would make Hobsons Landing the first master planned / multi-phase development in Portland to actually achieve a full build-out in well over a decade.
 

cneal

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I think you're right – in fact, I'm pretty sure it'll be the first ever development to complete its "master development plan" since the city established the new multi-phase development rules for the unbuilt 'midtown' project >8 years ago.
 

Portlander

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Canal Plaza would be the only multi-phase development that I know of that was completed close to the original vision historically. Hopefully the last two parcels of Portland Square will eventually get developed to finish off that block which started construction in the mid eighties.
 

DanielPWM19

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If Portland Square can get built, that will really fill the city in. Would love for that to happen. I doubt that Foreside will ever see full completion. Midtown? Just such a disappointment. Top of the Old Port? Who even knows anymore ...
 

Max

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I would offer that Maine Medical Center has probably been the most efficient developer in the city in the last decade. They put together a large-scale Master Development Plan, got community buy-in and got to work right away. They've hit every milestone on time and are on track to finish on time. And they raised about $550 million to make it happen!
 

Portlander

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I accept your offer Max and agree with your assessment but I didn't include MMC only because their mega complex is not located in what I consider the downtown core. I am looking forward to seeing their stunning new building once it's completed and it will make an excellent first impression when approaching the city from the west. Also looks like it should be ready for occupancy around the same time 201 Federal Street and the final phase of Hobson's Landing opens which will be an exciting time for Portland!
 

TC_zoid

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I accept your offer Max and agree with your assessment but I didn't include MMC only because their mega complex is not located in what I consider the downtown core. I am looking forward to seeing their stunning new building once it's completed and it will make an excellent first impression when approaching the city from the west. Also looks like it should be ready for occupancy around the same time 201 Federal Street and the final phase of Hobson's Landing opens which will be an exciting time for Portland!
Indeed it will. It feels like Portland goes up a level in city stature after these three developments. I think people underestimate the city's size due to its tiny politically drawn land area population numbers (from 21 square miles). When you look at the metro area numbers, the true measure of a city's size (otherwise El Paso, Texas is bigger than Boston and much bigger than Miami--a big ha to that), Portland is much more significant a place. And when you take into consideration that it's a kind of de facto suburb of nearby Boston attaching to those population numbers, I only see more and more growth. I think the train tether helps immensely. It's such an easy trip.
 

Portlander

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And to think that Huntsville has now surpassed Birmingham (also Montgomery and Mobile) as Alabama's largest city primarily due to it having an extra 70 square miles to pad it's population count! Virginia Beach (where I lived for many years) has 245 square miles and is now bigger than Miami, Oakland, Minneapolis, Tampa, New Orleans, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh and St. Louis to name a few. MSA populations are a more equitable way to measure a city's true relevance and overall stature.
 
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mainejeff

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There are many factors working in Portland's (and Maine's) favor for future development and population growth.....technology, work from home, natural resources, clean energy, climate change, political upheaval...as well as many other factors....all play into it.
 

Cosakita18

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If Portland really wants to meet its full potential… We’re going to need to be building at least 900-1,000 new units of housing annually. Right now we’re experiencing massive demand for affordable and market-rate rental housing and condo units with scarce supply and not nearly enough in the pipeline. Projects like this and 201 Federal are great, but not enough.
 

Seanflynn78

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Indeed it will. It feels like Portland goes up a level in city stature after these three developments. I think people underestimate the city's size due to its tiny politically drawn land area population numbers (from 21 square miles). When you look at the metro area numbers, the true measure of a city's size (otherwise El Paso, Texas is bigger than Boston and much bigger than Miami--a big ha to that), Portland is much more significant a place. And when you take into consideration that it's a kind of de facto suburb of nearby Boston attaching to those population numbers, I only see more and more growth. I think the train tether helps immensely. It's such an easy trip.
I currently live in Manchester, NH. The urban "foot print" of Portland is much bigger than Manchester . Manchester now has a population of 115k, which on paper sounds huge as I see entire peninsula is downtown when I drive around Portland. I have mentioned before where Manchester has a feel similar to a mid western city, Portland is more urban and funky than any section of Manchvegas. Portland being a seacost city helps it attract tourists. I am always rooting for Portland's downtown to transform their surface parking lots into 5 stories or more. Hoping some developer takes over the pencil thin tower (20 stories) and get it built. Portland needs more housing. Hopefully someday the city will reach 80k again. Then they can talk about Portland becoming a world class city.
 
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markhb

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I currently live in Manchester, NH. The urban "foot print" of Portland is much bigger than Manchester . Manchester now has a population of 115k, which on paper sounds huge as I see entire peninsula is downtown when I drive around Portland. I have mentioned before where Manchester has a feel similar to a mid western city, Portland is more urban and funky than any section of Manchvegas. Portland being a seacost city helps it attract tourists. I am always rooting for Portland's downtown to transform their surface parking lots into 5 stories or more. Hoping some developer takes over the pencil thin tower (20 stories) and get it built. Portland needs more housing. Hopefully someday the city will reach 80k again. Then they can talk about Portland becoming a world class city.
I think we're wandering afield of Hobson's Landing, but I've long felt that Manchester (despite being the largest city in NH) and Nashua, even though they're both larger than Portland, are held back by their proximity and ease of access to Boston (they have I-93, we have Route 1 through Saugus). They feel more like satellite cities of Beantown than Portland does. It helps that we're the largest city in a state that stretches on for another 6 hours north, most of which is full of supernatural creatures and terrifying ghosts (or so the media tells me).
 

TC_zoid

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I think we're wandering afield of Hobson's Landing, but I've long felt that Manchester (despite being the largest city in NH) and Nashua, even though they're both larger than Portland, are held back by their proximity and ease of access to Boston (they have I-93, we have Route 1 through Saugus). They feel more like satellite cities of Beantown than Portland does. It helps that we're the largest city in a state that stretches on for another 6 hours north, most of which is full of supernatural creatures and terrifying ghosts (or so the media tells me).
Not to belabor the point, but don't forget the train tether of Boston to Brunswick. The future of employment, Gen Z, do not like cars. They can't use their phones. I think this comfy and nice train is a key reason for the growth of Portland. Bowdoin, USM, UNE (Portland and Biddeford), and UNH are all nearby to stations.
 

DanielPWM19

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If Portland really wants to meet its full potential… We’re going to need to be building at least 900-1,000 new units of housing annually. Right now we’re experiencing massive demand for affordable and market-rate rental housing and condo units with scarce supply and not nearly enough in the pipeline. Projects like this and 201 Federal are great, but not enough.
And then I think:
"Sigh ... if only Midtown were built at its original height and scale. Except part-time wealthy white NIMBY residents balked at it."

I agree with all of the above. Maybe JB Brown and Redfern can lead the way - at least with some superfluous parking lot in-fill. I still say straightening the Franklin Corridor to open it up for development would create a wonderful boulevard. Also just look at a satellite view of Bayside to see all of the empty lots or non-value-adding buildings (Preble, Elm, Portland, Oak, Shelpley, Lancaster, Kennebec Streets). With Avesta building 337 Cumberland, lets rip down the old Goodwill Building while we're at it and drop a 20 story building there. And 97 Preble Street? Useless - Build at least a 6 story apartment building. Tons of small lots for 5-Story units. Get rid of the 4-leaf clover I:295 ramps to reconnect Forest Ave to Downtown with some core development. Same with the cluster-f**k at Congress/Fore River Parkway to reconnect Libbytown with Downtown. Empty lots on Free Street - Fill 'em in. Jordan's Meats - finish that block already. Simba Parking etc - drop some 6-8 story condos and call it a day. 338 Cumberland Ave - stick another Back Bay Tower here. Whatever the heck is 106 Oak Street - it's ugly, get rid of it. Corner of Cumberland and High - stick a beautiful corner facing building there. Let's go, Portland!!
 
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