I-90 Interchange Improvement Project & West Station | Allston

fatnoah

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Why the hell should Boston pay for a road that benefits the suburbs and wrecks a section of the city?
The highway isn't just for suburbanites. Some of us who live in the city and work in the suburbs also use the Pike. Granted, it's not the majority, but it does allow people in the city to go outside the city, not just vice-versa.

That said, I agree that investing in density and transit are better priorities.
 

HenryAlan

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The highway isn't just for suburbanites. Some of us who live in the city and work in the suburbs also use the Pike. Granted, it's not the majority, but it does allow people in the city to go outside the city, not just vice-versa.

That said, I agree that investing in density and transit are better priorities.
There are certainly plenty of individualized circumstances, but really my point is only partially related to how the money is spent. There might be no clear delineation of who benefits most and in which way from the Pike extension. I'm not suggesting that Framingham pay for it instead of Boston, more that the state has to shoulder the entire burden if it's built, rather than charge the city that is arguably harmed in aggregate by it being there anyway.
 

JumboBuc

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Again, the State's argument is that the highway component of the project is being paid by toll revenue. There's no funding shortfall there. The non-highway components are what the State is seeking additional funds for, and I think there's little question that Harvard and the City of Boston (representative of abutters to the project) are the ones that stand to gain the most value from those non-highway project components.

I'm not saying I agree that Boston and Harvard should be on the hook from it, but there's little denying that commuters are funding the highway project through tolls and that Harvard and Boston are the most to gain from the non-highway elements. If this were a strict highway rebuild project with no other components, additional funding wouldn't be necessary.
 

Charlie_mta

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Again, the State's argument is that the highway component of the project is being paid by toll revenue. There's no funding shortfall there. The non-highway components are what the State is seeking additional funds for...
The highway component work to be funded by toll revenues should include the redoing of Cambridge Street, plus constructing the main streets that will connect Cambridge Street to the Pike ramps. The rest of the new streets and West Station obviously need to be funded by others (Harvard, Boston, MASSDOT).
 

theSil

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Some of us who live in the city and work in the suburbs also use the Pike.
You're of course right that urban highways add value and are likely necessary for reverse commuters.

Zooming out further, one could point out that the job sprawl you're describing is yet another negative externality of these highways, but I digress...
 

bigeman312

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You're of course right that urban highways add value and are likely necessary for reverse commuters.

Zooming out further, one could point out that the job sprawl you're describing is yet another negative externality of these highways, but I digress...
It's important to drill down on this point.

While I am not making some generalization that interstate highways should not exist, it's plainly true that your run-of-the-mill I-495-adjacent office park is there because of I-495. Many mistakenly believe I-495 is there to bring them to their exurban office park when the opposite is most certainly true.
 

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