Lawrence Developments

cubalibre

Active Member
Joined
May 30, 2006
Messages
459
Reaction score
757
I had an hour to kill in Lawrence this morning so I took a stroll down Main Street and around Campagnone Common.
While there is plenty of evidence that the city is struggling - empty storefronts, loitering, open drug use on the street - I found it reasonably clean, well-kept, and I felt safe.
Campagnone Common is enormous (think Boston Common) and impeccable. There are some very nice buildings on Main Street and around the Common that are in pretty good shape. There are some enclaves of interesting retail, bagel shops, and restaurants. Some of the large mill buildings on the Merrimack river have been converted into lofts and office space.

First Main Street:
tc5odxC.jpg


HOY6NxW.jpg


mN6FQHq.jpg


0sHT9My.jpg


KTersHD.jpg


XC79sga.jpg


f87UFQE.jpg


fuFRI6O.jpg


w1WNFfc.jpg



Court House:
Mh7TcE9.jpg



City Hall:
j8uTSPN.jpg


W3xJFMS.jpg


FsEf5jj.jpg



Converted Mills:
zp9gvq2.jpg


TDJOwkf.jpg


KwFF59q.jpg


JMVbIfu.jpg



Around Campagnone Common:
pvXufd4.jpg


hTz2D6h.jpg


G4zmbsp.jpg


a9e4s7O.jpg


iZgV0BQ.jpg


m4eRu6i.jpg


Boston City Hall's little sister: the public library
hOJz1o8.jpg



Lawrence High School:
ijcllJX.jpg


M5IxfEw.jpg



Back around the Common:
ehR1gEo.jpg


fOeCvTd.jpg


nEJGXhH.jpg


YEIx3n6.jpg


KSpbWbx.jpg


1DZcD4K.jpg


nD6dFk4.jpg


pnE5jAI.jpg


zSs1n9e.jpg
 
Last edited:
As they say, it has good bones. What we are seeing in NY state is more people get driven out of NYC due to cost who are relocating to upstate, Hudson river towns which have spent the last 50 years bombed out. Even in Troy, which I couldn't get out of fast enough when I was 15, you are seeing brownstones reaching the $1m mark (although this isn't common). No doubt this is happening in the Boston area as well and it will be small cities like Lawrence, Lynn, Lowell, and Worcester picking up the slack. I think it's a great thing to breath new life into these small cities.
 
As they say, it has good bones. What we are seeing in NY state is more people get driven out of NYC due to cost who are relocating to upstate, Hudson river towns which have spent the last 50 years bombed out. Even in Troy, which I couldn't get out of fast enough when I was 15, you are seeing brownstones reaching the $1m mark (although this isn't common). No doubt this is happening in the Boston area as well and it will be small cities like Lawrence, Lynn, Lowell, and Worcester picking up the slack. I think it's a great thing to breath new life into these small cities.

Completely agree on this. I spent a wonderful couple of weeks in the Hudson river area and was loving the quality of life.

I have a particular affection for Lowell and its canals, but all of the cities of the Merrimack river from Concord down to Amesbury are untapped in good bones potential.
 
Great Lawrence pictures. I don’t think I’ve ever been to the downtown.

And yes - the high cost of living’s silver lining is the rejuvenation of outlying towns and cities. I went to Hudson NY last fall and it was pretty unbelievable how boutique-y the main drag was (and how extensive)... but, step off Main Street and it was more bombed out than any town I’ve seen in Massachusetts.
 
More proof that we need an investment in Regional Rail...clockface service all day long...to connect places like Lawrence (and Haverhill, Lowell, Lynn, Framingham, & Worcester, (& Pawtucket/Providence) to the Boston economy.

Houston's outermost loop (99) is 30~35 miles out from downtown Houston--basically at the radius of our I-495-- being able to sprawl out that far has been what's kept Houston so affordable.

Boston's solution to affordability has already been built. We just have to connect it with rail.
 
Love this little car-free court in Lawrence. It is near the Common, downtown. Good looking houses, but the court looks a little forlorn these days.


1574807055559.png

1574807090855.png
 
It's a city that has been left to rot. Lowell, Haverhill and Nashua have ascended while Lawrence is essentially on the declination. The past two mayors promised to bring tech to the city and they couldn't deliver.
 
Insightful article on Lawrence’s struggles, recent small successes, and uncertain future in light of COVID-19


Like other gateway cities, the economic boom of recent years had more modest impact than it had in the large cities, and any hard-won gains are in danger to be wiped out.
 
Hasnt been posted

Lowell City Council OKs sale of Hamilton Canal land to Lupoli Companies
low-l-LupoliHighRes2.jpg

LOWELL — The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to authorize City Manager Eileen Donoghue to enter into a land disposition agreement with Lupoli Companies for five city-owned Jackson Street parcels located in the Hamilton Canal Innovation District.

It’s a major move for the redevelopment of this part of the city, in which Lupoli Companies CEO Sal Lupoli has envisioned a mixed-use development across multiple buildings, including a large tower.

Donoghue said it will be a minimum $30 million investment in the district.

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.lo...-hamilton-canal-land-to-lupoli-companies/amp/

Current plan
View attachment 33757
View attachment 33758
View attachment 33759
View attachment 33760
View attachment 33761
View attachment 33762
Project site
https://www.lupolicompanies.com/282-merrimack

So someone is confused here. I don’t think it’s me.
 
First picture looks like the Lowell project. The rest look like Lawrence?

Huh. I just kind of assumed that it was all Lawrence and the author just got the city wrong.

Color me actually confused now. Why are two different cities being discussed?
 
Hopefully I can clear this up. The news article and the first picture are related to development parcels in the Hamilton Canal district in Lowell that the city sold to Lupoli Companies for redevelopment (that mid-rise is planned on the parcel directly across the canal from the new court). Everything else below what reads current plan is related to the Lupoli Companies development plans for Lawrence.
 

Back
Top