Lawrence

cubalibre

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I had an hour to kill in Lawrence this morning so I took a stroll down Main Street and around Campagnone Common.
While there is plenty of evidence that the city is struggling - empty storefronts, loitering, open drug use on the street - I found it reasonably clean, well-kept, and I felt safe.
Campagnone Common is enormous (think Boston Common) and impeccable. There are some very nice buildings on Main Street and around the Common that are in pretty good shape. There are some enclaves of interesting retail, bagel shops, and restaurants. Some of the large mill buildings on the Merrimack river have been converted into lofts and office space.

First Main Street:



















Court House:



City Hall:







Converted Mills:









Around Campagnone Common:












Boston City Hall's little sister: the public library



Lawrence High School:





Back around the Common:
















 
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vanshnookenraggen

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As they say, it has good bones. What we are seeing in NY state is more people get driven out of NYC due to cost who are relocating to upstate, Hudson river towns which have spent the last 50 years bombed out. Even in Troy, which I couldn't get out of fast enough when I was 15, you are seeing brownstones reaching the $1m mark (although this isn't common). No doubt this is happening in the Boston area as well and it will be small cities like Lawrence, Lynn, Lowell, and Worcester picking up the slack. I think it's a great thing to breath new life into these small cities.
 

reverend_paco

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As they say, it has good bones. What we are seeing in NY state is more people get driven out of NYC due to cost who are relocating to upstate, Hudson river towns which have spent the last 50 years bombed out. Even in Troy, which I couldn't get out of fast enough when I was 15, you are seeing brownstones reaching the $1m mark (although this isn't common). No doubt this is happening in the Boston area as well and it will be small cities like Lawrence, Lynn, Lowell, and Worcester picking up the slack. I think it's a great thing to breath new life into these small cities.
Completely agree on this. I spent a wonderful couple of weeks in the Hudson river area and was loving the quality of life.

I have a particular affection for Lowell and its canals, but all of the cities of the Merrimack river from Concord down to Amesbury are untapped in good bones potential.
 

FK4

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Great Lawrence pictures. I don’t think I’ve ever been to the downtown.

And yes - the high cost of living’s silver lining is the rejuvenation of outlying towns and cities. I went to Hudson NY last fall and it was pretty unbelievable how boutique-y the main drag was (and how extensive)... but, step off Main Street and it was more bombed out than any town I’ve seen in Massachusetts.
 

Arlington

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More proof that we need an investment in Regional Rail...clockface service all day long...to connect places like Lawrence (and Haverhill, Lowell, Lynn, Framingham, & Worcester, (& Pawtucket/Providence) to the Boston economy.

Houston's outermost loop (99) is 30~35 miles out from downtown Houston--basically at the radius of our I-495-- being able to sprawl out that far has been what's kept Houston so affordable.

Boston's solution to affordability has already been built. We just have to connect it with rail.
 

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