Maine Public Broadcasting Bldg. | 25 Commercial St. | Portland

markhb

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I want to see the photos they used for those two old-Portland mural walls! There aren't many good aerial shots like that showing Spring St. when it didn't go all the way through to Temple, or the intact Grant Trunk wharves.

(I also had to wonder if any of those studio spaces would have been big enough to bring back the auction).
 

NR2Portland

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Very impressed with the video. MP hit a home run on this. I wish all developers would have a presentation like this. What is going to happen with the Galt Building next door?
Couldn’t have said it better myself. This video presentation was perfectly executed and I’m very excited to see this passed and break ground!
 

PlantArch

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They had their first workshop with the HPB last night. The board seemed generally receptive (although I wasn't listening that closely). The developers played this video at the start of their presentation: https://www.mainepublic.org/a-new-home-for-maine-public-virtual-tour

Looks like they're going to build a really state-of-the-art facility.
The facade of the building resembles a scaled down version of the new Maine Med building in a way.
 

Max

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A couple of the more prickly members of the HPB were not that enthused about the front facade, one even likening it to a "jail, or an accordian." The architects explained that the vertical windows (which include some mechanism for reducing sun glare) are intended to help reduce the amount of heat absorbed by the building, especially in the summer. There was also some back and forth about the amount of greenspace and vegetation being proposed, with a couple HPB members suggesting vegetation along commercial street would be incongruous with the historic district. :rolleyes:
 

mainejeff

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A couple of the more prickly members of the HPB were not that enthused about the front facade, one even likening it to a "jail, or an accordian." The architects explained that the vertical windows (which include some mechanism for reducing sun glare) are intended to help reduce the amount of heat absorbed by the building, especially in the summer. There was also some back and forth about the amount of greenspace and vegetation being proposed, with a couple HPB members suggesting vegetation along commercial street would be incongruous with the historic district. :rolleyes:
Funny I made my "green" post before seeing this. Are they crazy? More trees are ALWAYS better.....this development looks awesome as is.
 

PlantArch

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A couple of the more prickly members of the HPB were not that enthused about the front facade, one even likening it to a "jail, or an accordian." The architects explained that the vertical windows (which include some mechanism for reducing sun glare) are intended to help reduce the amount of heat absorbed by the building, especially in the summer. There was also some back and forth about the amount of greenspace and vegetation being proposed, with a couple HPB members suggesting vegetation along commercial street would be incongruous with the historic district. :rolleyes:
Do you know what members that might be? I would like to respond to their assertion that vegetation is incongruous with the historic district. As a landscape designer and urban forester for forty years I have often encountered this type of blatant ignorance on the part of municipal officials. They need to be educated.
 

Max

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If you start watching the video at about the 1h 30m mark, there ensues a 5-6 minute discussion of the street level planter and the requirement for green space on/around the building. If you're willing to keep watching my recollection is the topic comes up again later in the meeting, but I don't recall where exactly.

 

TC_zoid

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Not that this is historic, but Boston's Seaport District is using one street as a public greenway with a virtual miniaturized wilderness. I've seen numerous designs around the country planned on this idea, bringing back some nature to the city. And look at Post Office Park with its trees and embedded large rocks. So cool and fun to hang out there, and in the middle of 19th Century era buildings.
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