Minneapolis | Twin Cities

Czervik.Construction

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No one:
Absolutely no one:
Me: Here is something you didn't know you needed until now....a Minneapolis development thread!! 🍾

I live here, so might as well post stuff.

This is Eleven, designed by Robert A.M. Stern. It was completed a couple of months ago and people have started moving in. It is about 35 floors, right on the Mississippi River. This thing is top shelf all around.
It is a mini version of 220 Central Park South or those other new, but look old residential towers. I never could figure out why something like this hasn't been built in Boston. I think it would fit right in vs another glass box.
 

Czervik.Construction

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Here is Ye Olde skyline. The wide glass slab in the front left is the RBC Gateway that has RBC Bank and the new Four Seasons hotel and condos. I checked it out and it is really well done. As the first luxury branded hotel in the city (strangely this city has no Ritz, St Regis, Four Seasons - until now, etc.), they did a great job of making it very luxurious and special without being too over the top and gaudy. It is welcoming, which is good as the pioneer in lux hotels in the city.

 

Aprehensive_Words

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I love how Certain Segments of Society out in Minnesota keep going on about how mInNeApOlIs iS sO dAnGeRoUs in the wake of the 2020 uprising, and yet developers keep seeing seriously strong market demand for projects like this.

It's almost like those Certain Segments are...full of it?
 

Czervik.Construction

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Well, like a lot of big cities, MPLS crime is up over 2019 which was a historic low, but over the longer term, it is still incredibly safe. The downtown got pretty bad during and after Covid but has also been slowly coming back to life - not like a Boston, SF or NYC, but much busier.

The North Loop has had billions of dollars poured into it to renovate old factories and warehouses to offices and housing, with lots of additional housing added over the last 10 years. This development is unique in my opinion because there is a height limit in the North Loop of about 7 or 8 floors, so this one must be in an overlapping zone or something.
 

393b40

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One problem with Minny: The winters are harsh compared to Boston which is pretty mild these days.
 

jklo

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One problem with Minny: The winters are harsh compared to Boston which is pretty mild these days.
Yeah. Boston's weather is bad enough. Can't imagine something like Minny.
 

Aprehensive_Words

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One problem with Minny: The winters are harsh compared to Boston which is pretty mild these days.
They are, but you'd be amazed what a proper coat, long underwear and a positive attitude can do. Not sure how things are going post-pandemic, but when I lived there about 10 years ago, there were loads of festivals and outdoor activities that seemed to get most folks enjoying the weather.
 

Czervik.Construction

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I take a twin cities winter all day over Boston. NYC is a toss-up.

Yes, it gets colder here, however, we really have 8 bad weeks - all of January and February (low 20's with a few weeks of daytime highs below zero). December and March are regular cold (~30 degrees).

What we do not have here is the raw dampness or the intense wind of New England winters. The air is dry and still, and often sunny. So, even if it is cold, if you're bundled up, it is fine. And the trade is amazing spring and fall weather and summers that are dry and in the mid-80's. Also, the sun sets a little after 9pm in the summer, so it can be a little light out close to 10pm.

Ok, enough derailing from me.

They are, but you'd be amazed what a proper coat, long underwear and a positive attitude can do. Not sure how things are going post-pandemic, but when I lived there about 10 years ago, there were loads of festivals and outdoor activities that seemed to get most folks enjoying the weather.
 

DZH22

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Yes, it gets colder here, however, we really have 8 bad weeks - all of January and February (low 20's with a few weeks of daytime highs below zero). December and March are regular cold (~30 degrees).
Daytime highs below 0 are completely unacceptable. I have already taken a ton of good walks this winter, like I do most winters. It starts becoming quite unpleasant when the "feels like" falls below 20 degrees. As an immediate example, right now it's 44 in Boston and 16 in Minneapolis. Even with sun and absolutely no wind, 16 is unpleasant walking weather (or sledding, skiing, essentially anything outdoors).

From December-February, it looks like the average temperature for Boston is about 14-15 degrees higher than Minneapolis. For those of us from Boston, how would you feel if we dropped the winter temps by that much? Is it really offset by a little less wind? Boston has some super windy streets for sure, but those are often specific wind-tunnels and not exactly comprehensive. A drop in average temperature as severe as 14-15 degrees in winter is HARSH!
 

Czervik.Construction

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I hear your points and as a former Northeasterner. I couldn't believe it myself until I experienced it.

1. Wind - once you leave the northeast, especially Boston, you notice the lack of constant wind. Getting knocked around by the wind and being consistently exposed to it is impactful on ability to deal with it. We generally have a slight breeze or still air.
2. Humidity/dampness - Boston and NYC are very damp in the winter relative to MN. The dampness causes that "gets into your bones cold", like when you stand outside you feel the cold just seeping in. We don't have any of that.
3. We have a lot of sunny days. Not like Hawaii or anything, but a lot of clear days. We also have a snowpack that forms in late November after a hard freeze and then you don't see the grass again until April. The snow reflects the sun and feels even brighter.
3. We do lots of outdoor stuff here - riding bikes with fat tires, sledding, cross-country skiing, ice skating, walks around the lakes, etc. - you learn how to properly bundle up and you are fine. As a counterpoint, I was in Miami for Thanksgiving and it was high 80's and humid and it was too hot to do anything outside.

A couple of weeks ago, my neighbor who is from Boston and I were commenting on the weather that week - grey, dreary, damp, sleet and heavy snow. It felt like Boston. I roll down my car window and he yells, "this weather sucks - just like Boston".

A dry sunny day here is amazing with our snow cover - it never melts, btw

Last weekend we went to an ice sculpture competition and then to an art exhibition that is held on a frozen lake in the city (all the lakes are frozen). It was about 18 degrees tops. The weekend before we went to an ice palace. We had a great time, bundle ourselves and the kids up and both events were packed. People get on with things.

And as I said above, the spring, fall and especially the summers here are absolutely amazing. So we suck it up in the winter and get payback in the warmer seasons. I live in the city and can walk to 3 lakes and biking trails and am also walking distance to whole foods, a bakery, etc. Add in the much lower cost of living and you can get why people deal with it.

A job recruiter once said, "you can't people to come to Minneapolis and you can't get them to leave either".


Daytime highs below 0 are completely unacceptable. I have already taken a ton of good walks this winter, like I do most winters. It starts becoming quite unpleasant when the "feels like" falls below 20 degrees. As an immediate example, right now it's 44 in Boston and 16 in Minneapolis. Even with sun and absolutely no wind, 16 is unpleasant walking weather (or sledding, skiing, essentially anything outdoors).

From December-February, it looks like the average temperature for Boston is about 14-15 degrees higher than Minneapolis. For those of us from Boston, how would you feel if we dropped the winter temps by that much? Is it really offset by a little less wind? Boston has some super windy streets for sure, but those are often specific wind tunnels and not exactly comprehensive. A drop in average temperature as severe as 14-15 degrees in winter is HARSH!
 

DZH22

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^^^That's such a major difference. Our lowest day-time high equals their highest. Our lowest night-time low is higher than their highest. Our "feels like" never goes below 0, whereas theirs remains below 0 for a week straight. I'll accept 5 mile an hour higher winds and negligible humidity differences in exchange for the extra 15-20 degrees!!!
 

393b40

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Interesting perspective on the Minny weather, thanks. I'll still take New England winters, we also seem to be warming rapidly thanks to climate change so in another twenty years it will probably be pleasant year round.
 

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