MIT.nano | Kendall Square | Cambridge

whighlander

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Potentially as important to the future of nano tech in Kendal, Boston/Cambridge and the world as the Whitehead Institute [papa of the Broad Institute] has been to bio/pharma

In addition to fit MIT.nano into its very confined site in the center of the MIT academic complex and to provide MIT.nano with the substantial utility connections required for its mission -- the whole process of demolition of the current Building 12 and the and construction of the new Building 12 will be a fascinating project to visit for nearly the next 4 years



http://capitalprojects.mit.edu/projects/mitnano-building-12
 
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whighlander

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Beeline -- you are a bit ahead of the game

While the old Bld 12 is closed and work in underway -- the building is still standing for at least the next 5 or so months
 

BeeLine

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Beeline -- you are a bit ahead of the game

While the old Bld 12 is closed and work in underway -- the building is still standing for at least the next 5 or so months
Thanks for the correction. I have edited my note. The walls around the site are so tall I have not been able to get a recent photo of the site. So I assumed they had demolished 12 by now.
 
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whighlander

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I just received a recent update from the project -- here are some highlights with quotes from Vladimir Bulović, the project’s faculty lead — and the Fariborz Maseeh Professor in Emerging Technology and associate dean for innovation in the School of Engineering from an earlier report:
http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/how-construction-mit-newest-building-will-affect-campus-0512


Construction of the MIT.nano building will itself pose many challenges, in the short term:

Just digging the hole for the new building’s foundation will involve removing 1.4 million cubic feet of dirt
The building itself will use 12,000 cubic yards of concrete, 3.4 million pounds of steel, and 53,000 square feet of glass.
On its way to the Building 12 site, all of that material will have to pass through just three access points.

While traditional construction of such a building would use sheet pilings around the foundation, this project will instead use slurry walls, poured in place. This is expected to produce far less noise and vibration than the driving of sheet pilings.
Construction vehicles will use exhaust scrubbing to minimize the impact of fumes on adjacent buildings.

The building itself will be constructed with far more steel and less concrete than is typical for such a structure, greatly reducing the number of trucks needed to deliver materials to the construction site.

The demolition of the existing Building 12 — not expected to begin until 2015 — equipment will dismantle and crush sections of the building as they are removed “to minimize the crashing of large pieces,”

The new building, described by architect Samir Srouji of Wilson Architects as “a stone box wrapped around with a veil of glass,” will connect to Building 13, Building 16, and have easy ground-level access from the Infinite Corridor and Building 24.


MIT.nano and the courtyard looking northeast from Building 4.
Courtesy of Wilson Architects

When asked about the $350 million cost of the building, Bulović said that the cost is comparable, per square foot, to that of similar recent buildings at Harvard University and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell. He added that the cleanroom space within MIT.nano is larger than that found at those facilities, and that the new building will include the highest-quality vibration-free space for imaging equipment on the entire MIT campus.

Details of the layout and landscaping of spaces between MIT.nano and other buildings are still being worked out, Bulović said, but MIT sees a significant opportunity to animate these as community spaces, he added.

Current tasks for next 2 weeks mostly involve underground pipes and ducts:
1 Bldg. 3 Temp. MEPFP for construction trailers in main lot (see plan) Interior n/a
2 Bldg. 4 level 4 install vacuum piping & existing roof re-work (see plan) Interior n/a
3 Bldg. 10 Basement removal of existing FP Main (see plan) Interior n/a
4 Bldg. 12 Interior demolition / test pits (see plan) Interior n/a
5 Bldg. 13 Basement / Level 1 electrical install (see plan) Interior n/a
6 Bldg. 16 install temp. CHW & medium voltage feed (see plan) Interior n/a
7 Bldg. 26 Areaway install temp. CHW (see plan) Interior n/a
8 Install new 26 way elec. Duct bank, 16" CHW main, temp. 13.8 elec. Feed (see plan) Exterior A
9 SS prep for MH installation / prep for 10" FP main installation (see plan) Exterior B
10 Excavation and installation SOE for new CHW and FP mains (See plan) Exterior C
11 Pre-Trench for process pipe install / backfill / asphalt patch pre-trench (see plan) Exterior E
12 Pre-Trench for process pipe / excavate, install 16" CHW loop connection (see plan) Exterior F
13 Installation of 8" FP main in Presidents Courtyard (see plan) Exterior H
14 Construction trailers in Main Lot - Install temp. utility infrastructure (see plan) Exterior I

Note the location and task codes refer to a project-related map and proj management table [not included]
 
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Shepard

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Where have you been Westie? Welcome back sir
 

whighlander

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Where have you been Westie? Welcome back sir
Shep -- thanks -- I've been doing a bit of traveling -- keeping a steady read of the forum -- but I didn't really have much to add

But to both my friends and others -- I'm back -- perhaps a bit more subdued? -- but eagaer in particular to see the new gen of towers such as Millenium, Four Seasons, Copley and especially the Congress St. Garage tower spring forth!
 

whighlander

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the Dec 15th update:
Progress is being made and un-made as site prep work continues and unforeseen conditions are encountered

President’s Courtyard
· Unforeseen conditions at the Bldg. 10 foundation require additional engineering for revised pathway.
· Schedule updates will be communicated to the community as information continues to develop.
Main Lot Access
· The utility work at the south end of buildings 17 and 31 has restricted access from Vassar St.
· Coordinated access for approved deliveries and handicap accessible parking in the Main Lot will be from Mass Ave. through Building 9.
· This will be two-way traffic until further notice.

Tasks:

  • Bldg. 4 level 4 install vacuum piping
    Bldg. 6C Penthouse vacuum piping install and testing
    Bldg. 8 Basement repair/renovation of water damage from FP main failure
    Bldg. 12 Interior abatement and selective demolition
    Bldg. 16 install temp. CHW & medium voltage feed
    Bldg. 26 existing areaway install CHW main and heat trace
    Install new 26 way elec. Duct bank, 16" CHW main, temp. medium voltage feed
    Install FP cross connection to Bldg. 8, SS and electrical duct bank excavation
    Excavation and installation SOE for new CHW and FP mains, relocate hydrant
    Excavate, install 16" CHW loop connection
    Installation of 8" FP main in Presidents Courtyard
    Construction trailers in Main Lot - Install temp. utility infrastructure
CHW - Chilled Water
FA - Fire Alarm
FP - Fire Protection
MEPFP - Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Fire Protection
MH - Manhole
SOE - Support of Excavation
SS - Sanitary Sewer
 
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whighlander

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the Dec 15th update:
Progress is being made and un-made as site prep work continues and unforeseen conditions are encountered
The Jan 9 Update
Lots of work with BIG pipes [up to 30" diameter chilled water lines] and electrical ducts

MIT.nano - 2 week look ahead - January 12 - January 30, 2015

ACTIVITY Interior / Exterior Work Zone


1 Interior Bldg. 4 Cut and cap existing utilities to prepare for bridge removal
2 Interior Bldg. 8 Utility work for construction support services
3 Interior Bldg. 12 Selective demolition and abatement
4 Interior Bldg. 13 Installation of electrical infrastructure for relocated vehicle access gate
5 Interior Bldg. 24 Cut and cap existing utilities to prepare for bridge removal
6 Interior Bldg. 26 existing areaway install CHW main insulation and metering
7 Exterior A Install new 16" CHW main, temp. medium voltage feed / expand MH29
8 Exterior B Electrical ductbank - excavation/SOE - conduit installation
9 Exterior C Excavation and installation SOE for new CHW and FP mains, relocate hydrant
10 Exterior D Excavation and installation of 30" CHW lines
11 Exterior E Excavation and installation of 30" CHW lines
12 Exterior F Install new 16" CHW main, temp. medium voltage feed / expand MH29
13 Exterior H Misc. landscape due FP main install and repair
14 Exterior I Construction trailers in Main Lot - Install temp. utility infrastructure
Getting ready for the first visible demolition the removal of the pedestrian bridges at the 2nd level that connect building 12 to the main complex via Bldg 4, and to the Vassar St. complex via Bldg 24



A recent example of the Nano World:

http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/wireless-chemical-sensor-for-smartphone-1208
Detecting gases wirelessly and cheaply
New sensor can transmit information on hazardous chemicals or food spoilage to a smartphone.




MIT chemists have devised a new way to wirelessly detect hazardous gases and environmental pollutants, using a simple sensor that can be read by a smartphone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_-Gxtiqf7E
More on what is being built on the Macro-scale -- i.e. the MIT.nano building itself -- layer by layer:

Maker spaces

Outfitted with tools to translate the ideas developed in MIT.nano into prototypes and handheld demos.

Upper & lower clean rooms

Two pristine, particle-free environments— each two stories tall and optimized for energy, airflow, and future flexibility—for the design and fabrication of micro- and nanoscale structures.

Nanoscale imaging

MIT’s “quietest” space for nanoscale viewing, optimized for imaging with low vibration and low electromagnetic interference.

click here for a full sized image of the building functional layers
https://mitnano.mit.edu/tour-building
 
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statler

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Odd question. Does MIT work with the architect and do their own structural engineering on projects like this or do they hire outside firms like normal projects?
 

SeamusMcFly

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I don't know. But, I do know. That is a lot of clean room space. That's gonna be fun to design..... And build.
 

cca

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Odd question. Does MIT work with the architect and do their own structural engineering on projects like this or do they hire outside firms like normal projects?
They do not self perform their own work. Typically the owner would never hold the contract of a consultant to the architect. The architect holds that contract. It would be a very strange and difficult situation was your client and your consultant.

cca
 

whighlander

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They do not self perform their own work. Typically the owner would never hold the contract of a consultant to the architect. The architect holds that contract. It would be a very strange and difficult situation was your client and your consultant.

cca
CCA there are many levels of consulting and support involved in a building as significant and complex a building project as MIT.nano

a lot of the detail is available on the following site:
http://capitalprojects.mit.edu/projects/mitnano-building-12

PROJECT TEAM
  • Architect: Wilson Architects, Boston, MA
  • Construction manager: Turner Construction, Boston, MA
  • MIT Team: Arne Abramson, Travis Wanat, Andrew Corson, Robert Cunkelman, Frank Higson, Jack Mannion
 

cca

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CCA there are many levels of consulting and support involved in a building as significant and complex a building project as MIT.nano
Agreed. I am suggesting that the prime consultants like structure and MEP/FP, Code, Accoustics, Lighting, Civil are not MIT folks. These are "typically" contracts held by the architects. MIT may have their own working groups for programming and equipment planning.

I am not involved in this particular project in any way. I am just putting out there what typically happens. If someone were to know that this was being done atypically, I would love to know how it is working, and why its different.

cca
 

whighlander

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Agreed. I am suggesting that the prime consultants like structure and MEP/FP, Code, Accoustics, Lighting, Civil are not MIT folks. These are "typically" contracts held by the architects. MIT may have their own working groups for programming and equipment planning.

I am not involved in this particular project in any way. I am just putting out there what typically happens. If someone were to know that this was being done atypically, I would love to know how it is working, and why its different.

cca
CCA:

Turner functions as the Owners rep [i.e. MIT] with respect to all the sub contracts for construction and Wilson does the same with respect to all the planning and design work

MIT through its Capital Projects Office is the owner and also has final responsibility for all that is inside the various spaces within the structure -- such as the imaging and fabrication tools, furniture, etc.

Wilson's website
http://live-wilson-architects.gotpantheon.com/work/mit-nano/
indicates that they have a considerable amount of relevant Expertise:
  • Campus Design
  • Consensus Building
  • Programming
  • Air-Rights
  • Classrooms
  • Core & Shell/Fit-Outs
  • Food
  • Historic
  • Learning Environments
  • Libraries
  • Life Science
  • Nanotechnology
  • Planning Precincts
  • Sustainability
  • Teaching Labs
  • Workplace

“Dedicated to experimentation and instruction, MIT.nano represents one of the largest commitments to research in MIT’s history. The facility will carry the last two decades of nanoscale characterization and investigation into new realms of application and discovery.”

MIT.nano will combine the Institute’s nanotechnology, materials, and engineering systems research with the most advanced fabrication tools and materials processing capabilities. Located steps from the Infinite Corridor and MIT’s Great Dome, the facility will serve 2,000 MIT researchers, faculty and students. MIT.nano will consolidate complex research activities while simultaneously creating new connections and outdoor spaces – transforming the significant site into a campus-wide asset and new destination for the Institute. MIT.nano is envisioned to become an exciting new hub for MIT’s School of Engineering and includes material science, imaging and chemistry teaching facilities.

from Turners website:
http://www.turnerconstruction.com/experience/project/6948/mitnano

MIT.nano is a centralized, high-tech facility for materials, structures and systems research aimed to advance the next generation of micro- and nano- technologies for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The project includes a cleanroom, fabrication, and imaging facilities, which will be shared by researchers across departments and disciplines. Through their interaction, supported by this facility, they will be poised to develop new technologies in the areas of energy, water, healthcare, transportation and the environment
[/QUOTE

The renders are starting to look a bit more solid and less ethereal



looking down


looking at the "front"
 

whighlander

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Serious demolition is now beginning -- the bridge between Building 12 and Building 24 will be removed in the next two weeks

A couple of photos of bldg 12 which will be demolished to make way for MIT.nano.


Bldg 12 MIT
Note the Building to be demolished and replaced by MIT.nano is the 2 story brick on the left of the pedestrian bridge

the other types of work with respect to pipes and cable banks both temporary and permanent are continuing as well

http://mitnano.mit.edu/campus-updates
 

whighlander

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whighlander

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MIT has released a new render of the interior of the facility in the form of a cross section



Maker spaces

Outfitted with tools to translate the ideas developed in MIT.nano into prototypes and handheld demos.

Upper & lower clean rooms

Two pristine, particle-free environments— each two stories tall and optimized for energy, airflow, and future flexibility—for the design and fabrication of micro- and nanoscale structures.

Nanoscale imaging

MIT’s “quietest” space for nanoscale viewing, optimized for imaging with low vibration and low electromagnetic interference.


An MIT spin-off company of has developed an a macro-nano fabrication tool
Kateeva's YIELDjet system (pictured here) is a massive version of an inkjet printer. Large glass or plastic substrate sheets are placed on a long, wide platform. A head with custom nozzles moves back and forth, across the substrate, coating it with OLED and other materials.



Courtesy of Kateeva
-- the practicality of printing any material on any substrate on a large-scale
 
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