NYC Transit

TheRifleman

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Went to NYC this weekend:

Took the NYC Transit: from the Madison Ave area to the Bronx to catch a Yankees Game. I could not tell you how easy this was.

I'm not sure about the entire grid but I have to say the GreenLine was clean and efficient. Also the people working for the NYTransit were very helpful making sure I took the right trains and explained which specific cars to take.

Service Cars were very clean also the Platforms were very clean.

I only took the Green Line so I can't judge the rest of the service & platforms but what I have experienced I feel pretty comfortable hopping around the Manhattan through the Transit connections.
 

TheRifleman

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Green Line as in the 4/5/6, yes?
YES---- (Maybe that was the best one)** I'm not sure about the rest of the grid but- I would like to here other people's experience taking the NYC transit. I felt very safe and I also heard that people don't talk to you but that wasn't the case for me.

It's definitely the Bloodline to that City along with the Taxi's
 

Reznor

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Hard to compare to any other US system as it's dwarfs all others.

NYC Metro is great in terms of accessibility (at least in Manhattan and Brooklyn). Rush hours trains (similar to any major metro) can be completely packed and face delays. Crowding is definitely more so than we are used to in Boston.

In terms of cleanliness, I would say 4/5/6 is one of the cleaner lines/cars. Some of the older trains, stations can be gross, though not that different than some of the MBTA stations. But there are many more riders than other cities/networks. Subway runs 24 hours and is mostly safe, even at 3am.

Uber is doing a number to the supremacy of the yellow cabs in NY. While ubitquitous, their business is plummeting. Likely similar to cab trends in Boston, SF, etc.

Of course, I think London and Paris are far superior to NYC metro in all regards, but that's a different debate/tangent.
 

davem

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Next time Rif is in the city I hope he takes the A train up into Washington heights. Or stops into the Port Authority.

Yeah, NYC runs a great service. But then stuff tourists don't see is really, really gross.
 

Matthew

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I wonder if that elevator transfer at 168th street is still as nasty as it was in the 90s.
 

Justin7

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Convenient and efficient, yes, but "clean" has definitely not been experience in The Manhattan. Certainly not compared to Boston.
 

sm89

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Really??

I was also in NYC this weekend. Would it hurt to have more than one system map per station? The only map was near the booth with the attendant despite the fact that many stations had multiple entrances. We found ourselves wandering around all the time trying to figure out which line to take. Even in the subway cars it was hard to find a map other than for the line you are on. On the station platforms there was not one map. How do they expect people to find out how to get around??
 

Lrfox

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Really??

I was also in NYC this weekend. Would it hurt to have more than one system map per station? The only map was near the booth with the attendant despite the fact that many stations had multiple entrances. We found ourselves wandering around all the time trying to figure out which line to take. Even in the subway cars it was hard to find a map other than for the line you are on. On the station platforms there was not one map. How do they expect people to find out how to get around??
I know it's not right to assume that everyone has a smartphone, but the free system maps apps are easy to use and you can view them anywhere (it's nice to browse a map on your phone and know before you get into the station what direction you need to go and where you need to transfer). I can't remember the last time I was in any city and stopped to look at their printed system map to find my way.

If you want to get sophisticated, apps now tell you when the next trains are coming, when you have to leave your current location to catch one, and which station entrance is closest to you. Aside form not owning a smartphone (or having access to the internet to view/print a map beforehand), I can't see why you'd need a printed system map. Is it nice? Sure. I like them for pure aesthetics alone. But not really a necessity at this point.
 

datadyne007

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If you want to get sophisticated, apps now tell you when the next trains are coming, when you have to leave your current location to catch one, and which station entrance is closest to you. Aside form not owning a smartphone (or having access to the internet to view/print a map beforehand), I can't see why you'd need a printed system map. Is it nice? Sure. I like them for pure aesthetics alone. But not really a necessity at this point.
Why waste the battery using apps that likely use GPS and hence drain the battery faster? If you're visiting NYC, you want to be out all day exploring and such and don't have time to stop somewhere and charge your phone. Printed system maps are still important wayfinding tools.

That said, I carry a pocket map when I'm in NYC and pre-plan most of my trips before entering the station to prevent wandering around trying to figure out where to go.
 

cybah

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Why waste the battery using apps that likely use GPS and hence drain the battery faster? If you're visiting NYC, you want to be out all day exploring and such and don't have time to stop somewhere and charge your phone. Printed system maps are still important wayfinding tools.

That said, I carry a pocket map when I'm in NYC and pre-plan most of my trips before entering the station to prevent wandering around trying to figure out where to go.
I still carry around a system map of the T. It's amazing how useful it has come.. mostly showing tourists where to go (and I often give away my map)
 

F-Line to Dudley

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Convenient and efficient, yes, but "clean" has definitely not been experience in The Manhattan. Certainly not compared to Boston.
Yes. Caked-up grime and water damage on station structures can be a problem here, but the T's janitorial contractor does--and has done for years--a superb job keeping the platforms and all passenger areas clean, and quickly cleaning out the trash bins. You see them everywhere...in large staffing numbers, and not slacking off on the job. The train crews also, frankly, do a better job than anyone could reasonably expect between runs keeping the cars clean. As well as shop staff when it comes to stamping out fresh graffiti. Even 'scratchitti' on windows and stainless steel surfaces generally doesn't last long here.

Granted, scale of the system is totally different and NYC Subway made amazing progress the last 20 years putting its bad old graffiti days behind it. But messes in passenger areas just aren't tolerated here like they are in New York. Big institutional and cultural difference.
 

vanshnookenraggen

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NYC also has a long history of neglecting infrastructure so even when subway stations are cleaned up there is still decades of decay that won't even go away without some total rebuilding; and when you have 468 stations that isn't going to be cheap.
 

cybah

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Yes. Caked-up grime and water damage on station structures can be a problem here, but the T's janitorial contractor does--and has done for years--a superb job keeping the platforms and all passenger areas clean, and quickly cleaning out the trash bins. You see them everywhere...in large staffing numbers, and not slacking off on the job. The train crews also, frankly, do a better job than anyone could reasonably expect between runs keeping the cars clean. As well as shop staff when it comes to stamping out fresh graffiti. Even 'scratchitti' on windows and stainless steel surfaces generally doesn't last long here.
I agree. Its one of the few things I give the T props for. They really do tackle graffiti and keep the stations fairly clean. I even rode on a freshly cleaned bus this morning.

I can't say that much for NYT.. the few times I've rode the subway in NYC I didn't want to touch anything.
 

Norval Elliot

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This is one of the most vicious acts I can remember: someone torched a train at the Central Park North (110 St) station around 3:15 Friday morning. The fire killed the heroic 36-year-old motorman, Garrett Goble, and injured 17 others, including five firefighters. The images of the charred cars and station are horrific.

Further reading:
Operator Is Killed in a Subway Fire in Manhattan; Arson Is SuspectedThe New York Times
Hero MTA train operator dies trying to evacuate commuters from Harlem subway fire, at least nine others hospitalizedNY Daily News
 

F-Line to Dudley

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This is one of the most vicious acts I can remember: someone torched a train at the Central Park North (110 St) station around 3:15 Friday morning. The fire killed the heroic 36-year-old motorman, Garrett Goble, and injured 17 others, including five firefighters. The images of the charred cars and station are horrific.

Further reading:
Operator Is Killed in a Subway Fire in Manhattan; Arson Is SuspectedThe New York Times
Hero MTA train operator dies trying to evacuate commuters from Harlem subway fire, at least nine others hospitalizedNY Daily News
They might have known something about the tunnel layout, too. Pinched area, very hard to access, maximal distance from a firehose hookup. That's not a mere unlucky set of coincidences.
 

Norval Elliot

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They might have known something about the tunnel layout, too. Pinched area, very hard to access, maximal distance from a firehose hookup. That's not a mere unlucky set of coincidences.
The fire on the uptown train probably started in or just before the deep-rock tunnel (section 7) under Central Park. I shudder to think about the possible outcome of a slightly earlier ignition. Below are links to additional images and a video:


Update: The NYPD has questioned a person of interest about the blaze.

Suspect in fatal NYC subway fire charged with another arson caseNew York Post
Ex-con quizzed in Harlem train fire that led to conductor’s death is charged in earlier arsonNY Daily News
 

Norval Elliot

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Announced by the MTA yesterday:
Beginning Wednesday, May 6, at 1 a.m., there will be no subway service from 1 a.m. to 5 a.m. while we disinfect trains and stations. Bus service will continue to run 24/7 under the Essential Service Plan.

Between 1 a.m. and 5 a.m., essential workers will be able to use our Essential Connector service. Essential Connector riders will be limited to two trips per night on for-hire-vehicles and must show proof of essential travel with appropriate credentials. Riders who do not have a smartphone will be able to request a ride through a dedicated number. Wheelchair-accessible vehicles will also be available.
Aside from shutdowns caused by weather, strikes, and blackouts, the foregoing closure is unprecedented in the system's 115-year history.
 

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