Roxbury Infill and Small Developments

JumboBuc

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BeeLine

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“Dudley Square or Nubian Square? The question moves to the voters”

“Residents will be able to vote on whether Dudley Square should become Nubian Square in the latest move to change a Boston landmark’s name because of its racial history.”

“The city council unanimously OK’d the petition for a ballot question, which is backed by Mayor Martin Walsh.”

-Boston Herald
Link
Don't want to start a derailment, but were all these people racist???

IMG_4230 by Bos Beeline, on Flickr
 

Suffolk 83

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Don't want to start a derailment, but were all these people racist???

IMG_4230 by Bos Beeline, on Flickr
I think I heard something about them being slave owners. I get to vote on this and honestly I'm going to just stay out of it. I feel like it's whoever's neighborhood that is to decide that fate, not quite sure why the whole city is deciding.
 

whighlander

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I think I heard something about them being slave owners. I get to vote on this and honestly I'm going to just stay out of it. I feel like it's whoever's neighborhood that is to decide that fate, not quite sure why the whole city is deciding.
Suffolk -- 1st I seriously doubt that any present or former residents have had or have any connection to Nubia
2nd -- Whosoever Neighborhood -- is a sample in a continuum -- going back to people such as the Dudley's and including a whole lot of people from other European places such as Ireland
e.g. John L. Sullivan (1858–1918), boxing heavyweight champion, born in Roxbury, St. Joseph's Catholic Church was the first Catholic Church with a predominantly Irish congregation, built in 1846 in Roxbury
Germany [founders of many of the once- many breweries in Boston]
and later Russia [many of whom were Jewish and who established a significant community [some of whom are probably still alive] example:
Guide to the Records of the Jewish Memorial Hospital and Rehabilitation Center (Roxbury, Mass.), undated, 1915-1999, with gaps
Historical Note
JMHRC image

Jewish Memorial Hospital and Rehabilitation Center on the corner of Townsend Street and Washington Street in Roxbury.

In 1913, the Roxbury Ladies' Bikur Cholim Association began collecting donations to provide a haven for the chronically ill. These charitable ladies recognized that the new Jewish immigrants, crowded into Boston's West End and North End neighborhoods, lacked basic medical care. Many of these Jewish newcomers found upon their arrival that few Jewish doctors practiced in the Boston area. Furthermore, communication between doctor and patient was difficult since many Jews spoke no English, and very few doctors spoke Yiddish. Moreover, many local doctors did not understand the particular social problems, religious traditions, and behavior patterns of the new immigrants. Finally, many Orthodox Jews refused to stay in hospitals where they could not eat kosher food and observe the Sabbath. Hence, the ladies of the Bikur Cholim, many of them immigrants, began a grassroots movement to build a medical institution for Jews who were suffering from illness and disease and who had no place to go.

Charted as an official organization in 1915, the Roxbury Ladies' Bikur Cholim Association carried on the Jewish tradition of benevolence by visiting the sick, poor, and elderly. They provided medicine, money, prayer, and support to those who lacked medical care. The ladies met regularly at the YMCA on the corner of Seaver Street and Humboldt Avenue, across from Franklin Park. Here they developed their plans for a medical institution to serve the needs of the Jewish community. On April 16, 1928, the Association voted to establish and maintain a home for incurables. Later that same year, in October, the Association realized its goal of a Jewish hospital by purchasing the former Beth Israel Hospital at 59 Townsend Street for $25,000, with a $10,000 down payment and a $15,000 mortgage. Payments were to be $900 per year at a 6% interest rate. Also in 1928, the Association joined the Federated Jewish Charities.

In 1929 the Greater Boston Bikur Cholim Hospital, with 42 beds, was officially dedicated. A medical staff consisting of volunteer physicians was organized, and a hospital-based auxiliary was formed to supply linens. At this time, the hospital was primarily a custodial institution, accepting patients other hospitals were no longer able to keep. In the early 1930s, the physiotherapy, radiology, and laboratory departments were opened. It should be noted that during the 1930s, eighty-five percent of the patients admitted received free care, and a majority of the financial support for the new hospital came from the Jewish community. A new three-story wing was dedicated in 1936, doubling the size of the hospital to 87 beds. This new wing included a complete operating room, dental department, and a kosher kitchen to ensure strict adherence to Jewish dietary laws. Finally, to reflect the changing focus of the institution the name of the hospital was changed to the Jewish Memorial Hospital in 1937.

I'd be willing to bet that some of the little old Jewish Ladies who are still alive with connections to Jewish Roxbury -- might have a different perspective -- than a Nubian Square

Who knows -- given current demographic trends Asian and Hispanics may soon dominate the population in Roxbury
 

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