Somerville Infill and Small Developments

Lrfox

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I tend to agree with the sentiment behind the restrictions on parking permits: If you have access to off-street parking, you don’t need an on-street permit.
Is this even a big issue in Somerville? I've lived in two spots in town - Between Davis and Teele Squares, and in Prospect Hill - and on-street parking has never been an issue. Not even close to the way it is in parts of Cambridge and Boston. And isn't some of the functionality intended to allow residents to access other sections of town by car? I always assumed that that's part of the reason for not restricting parking to the zones specified on the permits. I'm predominantly a transit user/pedestrian with a car for weekend/late night trips, but I do occasionally drive to other neighborhoods in town for a variety of reasons and I'd be pretty upset if that ability were impacted by permit changes. Especially since I'm not really seeing the need.
 

chrisbrat

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yeah, what you said. if i live in somerville (i do) and i have off-street/driveway parking (i don't now, but have in the past) i still want to be able to go anywhere in the town where i live and pay taxes and be able to park in designated resident parking b/c i'm a goddamn resident. "if you have access to off-street parking, you don't need an on-street permit" is perhaps the stupidest thing i've read all month.
 

Equilibria

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I tend to agree with the sentiment behind the restrictions on parking permits: If you have access to off-street parking, you don’t need an on-street permit.
There's no off-street parking in the project. The point is that there would be no parking available at all for residents there.
 

Equilibria

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so they can park on the street. and?
I'm not sure you understand. They can't park on the street. The intent is to build them no spaces and ban them from buying permits. There would be no way to live there and own a car.

I know that's not an issue for a lot of folks (nor for me really, if you want to live car-free it's a fine option), but my issue is with this notion that current residents and developers can collude to strip future residents of the benefits of residency. Again, there's nothing to stop a future developer from forcing residents to forgo access to public schools in a lease (or at least suggesting that to the neighbors). In a way, they already do this by establishing 55+ communities or banning students and other "undesirable transients".

It's selfish, discriminatory, and just generally douchey for the neighbors to behave this way.
 

chrisbrat

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I'm not sure you understand. They can't park on the street. The intent is to build them no spaces and ban them from buying permits. There would be no way to live there and own a car.

I know that's not an issue for a lot of folks (nor for me really, if you want to live car-free it's a fine option), but my issue is with this notion that current residents and developers can collude to strip future residents of the benefits of residency. Again, there's nothing to stop a future developer from forcing residents to forgo access to public schools in a lease (or at least suggesting that to the neighbors). In a way, they already do this by establishing 55+ communities or banning students and other "undesirable transients".

It's selfish, discriminatory, and just generally douchey for the neighbors to behave this way.
oh. yeah, i guess i hadn't read all of the previous as carefully as i ought to have. based on your above summary: yes, that's stupid and i'm surprised it's legal, frankly.
 

Equilibria

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They're really banking on that strip of stores building up to literally cover their ass, aren't they?
 

Ruairi

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wow, hadn't seen this before as I don't go through Magoun Sq due to bridge closure. Christ, it's ugly!
 

George_Apley

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Yeah I haven't been through there in months. This just popped out of nowhere!
 

RandomWalk

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Technically, that one is in Medford. The original plan involved rebuilding the Somerville strip, but they bailed and stuck to one city.
 

Lrfox

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It's not pretty, but I'm not upset about the added housing. This will always be a tough spot from an urban standpoint though. Too car heavy. I do appreciate what Dark Horse brings to the area. It's one of the few places around that's not inundated with hipsters and bros. The mac and cheese portions are enough for two meals too which I appreciate.

On a very mature side note, I've always liked the juxtaposition Wang's and Woody's right next to each other. Hell, even Pini's. Never change.
 

Vagabond

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This will always be a tough spot from an urban standpoint though. Too car heavy. I do appreciate what Dark Horse brings to the area. It's one of the few places around that's not inundated with hipsters and bros.
For a spot that's not on a T corridor, Magoun Square is pretty busy. Almost every storefront is full, and there are a number of developments going up around it adding density. As soon as the Broadway bridge finishes up and the 2 new T stops open within walking distance, this area will likely look much different a few short years.
The current residents are having a heart attack about the new bus lanes, but it's a direct shot to Sullivan Square, so they should probably try it out.
 

beck4537

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The whole problem with the new dedicated bus lanes is that it is only for 1 small section of Broadway near Winter Hill. If you're on Broadway driving towards Sullivan once you pass the McGrath the dedicated bus lanes disappears. Same thing going the other way. Once you past the strip of shops in Winter Hill going towards Medford it turns back into a one lane road again with no bus lanes.
 

Coyote137

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Man, that development has been going on for a long time. It broke ground at least a couple years ago.
 

Lrfox

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For a spot that's not on a T corridor, Magoun Square is pretty busy. Almost every storefront is full, and there are a number of developments going up around it adding density. As soon as the Broadway bridge finishes up and the 2 new T stops open within walking distance, this area will likely look much different a few short years.
The current residents are having a heart attack about the new bus lanes, but it's a direct shot to Sullivan Square, so they should probably try it out.
No it definitely is a busy spot, and you actually have good urban density on the South side of Broadway (the side with Olde Magoun's) and the retail spots are active/full. But the opposite side of Broadway is where the work is needed. I'm not sure how to fix it.

I'm happy with the bus lanes. I know cyclists are too. I'm also glad to see that drivers are getting used to not driving in the new lanes. A few weeks back, people were basically ignoring them.
 

chrisbrat

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No it definitely is a busy spot, and you actually have good urban density on the South side of Broadway (the side with Olde Magoun's) and the retail spots are active/full. But the opposite side of Broadway is where the work is needed. I'm not sure how to fix it.
It's pretty striking how the addition of just *one* spot, Winter Hill Brewing, has had such an impact on the other side of the hill. Strange how no other business has realized that Winter Hill can support more than just pizza joints, nail/hair salons, and one sit-down brewery/restaurant. The fugly new building opposite WHB on the corner of Temple and Broadway had/has retail spots at ground-level, but so far just a salon and a (soon to be closed) clothing store. The area could do with another bar or restaurant. "Back in the day," that area of Winter Hill had, like, four bars. The immediate and major concern for that zip code, though, is the vacant Star Market. Get that parcel developed and Winter Hill becomes an entirely different place. Sarma and WHB demonstrate that there's plenty of profit to be made by positioning quality, desirable sit-down spots -- get crackin!
 

chrisbrat

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On a very mature side note, I've always liked the juxtaposition Wang's and Woody's right next to each other. Hell, even Pini's. Never change.
Woody's, Wang's, and Pini's -- the "Block of Cock" as it is referred to.
 

Ruairi

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It's not pretty, but I'm not upset about the added housing. This will always be a tough spot from an urban standpoint though. Too car heavy. I do appreciate what Dark Horse brings to the area. It's one of the few places around that's not inundated with hipsters and bros. The mac and cheese portions are enough for two meals too which I appreciate.

On a very mature side note, I've always liked the juxtaposition Wang's and Woody's right next to each other. Hell, even Pini's. Never change.
yup, I've heard it refered to as cock row plenty of times :)
 

ceo

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Also, having off-street parking doesn't guarantee you have it all the time. Mine is shared with my downstairs neighbor, so one of us has to park on the street if we're both home, and that's the case for pretty much every multifamily house in Somerville that has a driveway.
Not providing off-street parking has one serious disadvantage: no way to charge an electric car. That's actually one of the biggest impediments to widespread adoption of electric cars in cities.
 

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