Union Square D2.1 | 10 Prospect Street | Somerville

Life Coach Mike

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Agreed. Imagine what that building would look like without them: plain brick block. Add the spires, and suddenly it looks like an institution.
They've been institutions for decades, at least 75 years...Roosevelt Towers...early East Cambridge public housing...with class!
 

Czervik.Construction

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I hope that at the street level it is a good neighbor, as isn't a swath of blank wall that throws a cold shoulder to the area. Also, I hope the construction process goes without a hitch. Given that this is the first tall building in the area, if this goes well and the neighbors feel good, it will pave a smoother path for future phases here as well as other projects.
 

RandomWalk

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That framing almost looks like it’s light enough that it’s getting the precast floor slabs. However, they have the steel formwork for cast-in-place concrete decking below it.
 

Texasian

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That framing almost looks like it’s light enough that it’s getting the precast floor slabs. However, they have the steel formwork for cast-in-place concrete decking below it.
From the weekly construction updates USQ sends out:
Steel erection and precast plank install at the tower will continue.
Looks like you hit the nail on the head.
 

RandomWalk

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Floor to floor height with minimal dead space is one of the drivers for choosing the precast planks. It also allows for higher construction speed and reduced quality control issues due to the climate controlled environment for casting the planks.
 

shockingboston

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I do not post much, so do not mind me if this has been discussed already…I have seen the use of precast floors in multi-story parking garage construction, but not in vertical buildings. Based on the picture it appears the steel erection has stop to allow the install of the precast. Are the benefits of precast floors so great that the contractor would affect steel erection schedule and sequence? I would think steel is more efficient with out ‘the stop and wait for precast’.
 

RandomWalk

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The precast is usually staged at the site and the sequencing is done differently to get the floors together faster. The precast has the benefit that the floor is done and ready for rough framing almost as soon as it is assembled. The cast in place slab on steel requires more sequencing to get the floor deck finished after erection.
 

Equilibria

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Floor to floor height with minimal dead space is one of the drivers for choosing the precast planks. It also allows for higher construction speed and reduced quality control issues due to the climate controlled environment for casting the planks.
In that case, why don't we see it more? I don't remember seeing it before this project...
 

RandomWalk

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I believe it has different load limits than the cast in place. It’s suitable for residential and hotel loads, but not lab or office loads. I will defer to the licensed engineers amongst the readers of this board for their insight.
 

BeeLine

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