75 Chestnut Street | Portland

Max

Active Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2006
Messages
395
Reaction score
271
To my knowledge there have been no suggestions from the city for what they might do with the Oxford Street shelter once Riverside is opened (which would be Spring 2023 at the earliest). Intuition says they'd sell the lot to a developer, but that's just speculation.

Even without the homeless shelter, this new building directly abuts a squat and rather unattractive parking garage and is within spitting distance of a working scrapyard, which I can't believe is still operating on the peninsula. If it helps our street cred nationally, I'd bet we have the only Whole Foods that's across the street from a scrap yard!
 

markhb

Active Member
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
568
Reaction score
129
The city actively tried to get that scrap yard to move to Riverside, probably to the lot where the shelter is going (I don't know how many lots they initially got from Lucas Tree). They refused.
 

TC_zoid

Active Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2014
Messages
342
Reaction score
178
To my knowledge there have been no suggestions from the city for what they might do with the Oxford Street shelter once Riverside is opened (which would be Spring 2023 at the earliest). Intuition says they'd sell the lot to a developer, but that's just speculation.

Even without the homeless shelter, this new building directly abuts a squat and rather unattractive parking garage and is within spitting distance of a working scrapyard, which I can't believe is still operating on the peninsula. If it helps our street cred nationally, I'd bet we have the only Whole Foods that's across the street from a scrap yard!
Agreed. I travel a lot because of my work and usually Whole Foods, or the newer ones, are in the upscale areas of cities (aka, "Whole Paycheck"). And don't be surprised if the city continues to operate the current homeless shelter. By the time the new one opens, it will probably not be able to handle the numbers. Maine Med has this problem too. By the time the new addition opens, it too will be at capacity (last week they announced another new building for the Scarborough campus). You don't need a crystal ball for those predictions. The scrap yards becoming developed is a big unknown. Why would the Federated guy sell them now? You saw the article link I just posted from Maine Biz. Portland is projected to have the fastest growing home prices in the nation next year. This projection is tied to vacant land values. All that Mr. Federated has to do to make his hefty annual return is sit on the land (its appreciation). It would take a reckless Whale coming in to swallow that sales price. Sad. It could have been such a cool area to develop. Check out the new Echelon residential and shopping district in Boston's Seaport District that is opening early next year (from the recent Boston Globe article). It's residential, shopping, food, and entertainment designed for the future. If the scrap yards had this kind of development... (My prediction for the next hot growth area in Portland comes in 2023 when USM opens its new buildings. These designs are cutting edge and exactly how Gen Z wants to socialize and live within. It will create a BIG buzz and Portland will be the place to go to college. It's an easy train ride to Boston. I went to USM Portland for a year, years ago. I loved the urban feel of this area and walking around to other places was a snap. The houses abutting this area are going to go up, WAAAAAAAY up. I lived in one during that one year.)
 
Last edited:

TC_zoid

Active Member
Joined
Apr 16, 2014
Messages
342
Reaction score
178
The city doesn't own the Oxford Street shelter. They lease it from a private owner for a whopping $164,000 a year (or $13,600/month):
Good find. It's not going anywhere at that price. And $20 mill for a new one? Why not reduce the overflow of the existing one with more affordable housing? I listened to the head of the PHA talk a few years ago during the dedication ceremony at the second of their housing projects in history--Franklin Towers and the green Passive House multi-family building across (only two?). He said there was a waiting list of over 12,000! How do you fix this problem? Stop the few and far between 4-6 story builds. Portland needs 18 story solutions and not just on the peninsula. Otherwise, go ahead and build your $20 mill homeless shelter and watch it fill up in less than a year. If the city continues to let rich out-of-state transplants dictate policy the insanity will never end. Current policy is not working, so why not change it? In NYC, back in the 80s, they used to create SROs for the homeless -- Single Residency Occupation (with a voucher system). They were large apartment-like buildings and the units were tiny, like a dorm room. The Jane Hotel on the lower west side was set up like this back then, though now it's a kind of youth hostel with a Gen Z nightclub on the roof. The bathrooms of the SROs were in the middle of the floor, and shared, like old-style college dorms. Of course, this concept would need some tweaks for today. Occupants need privacy for sleeping and a place to keep their stuff. They don't need a private bath. The top floor units could have private baths for those serious about work, as an incentive to climb levels, with the ultimate goal of finding a better apartment. A mental health counselor needs to be present in a small office on the ground floor for 5 days of the week. This person has to be qualified in not only credentials, but as a cheerleader, of sorts. Also, a 24/7 armed security officer. That's it. And a 24/7 coffee shop on the ground floor where occupants can interact (staffed by the residents). True, the drug problem is a difficult animal to train. But that's ubiquitous. The expenditure is justified if the building is big enough--at least 500 beds. In closing, two types of buildings can be built--a typical affordable housing hi-rise and an SRO type of one. Spending money doesn't fix problems if you don't apply some intelligence. Einstein once said, "The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result."
 
Last edited:

DanielPWM19

New member
Joined
Aug 21, 2020
Messages
72
Reaction score
68
To my knowledge there have been no suggestions from the city for what they might do with the Oxford Street shelter once Riverside is opened (which would be Spring 2023 at the earliest). Intuition says they'd sell the lot to a developer, but that's just speculation.

Even without the homeless shelter, this new building directly abuts a squat and rather unattractive parking garage and is within spitting distance of a working scrapyard, which I can't believe is still operating on the peninsula. If it helps our street cred nationally, I'd bet we have the only Whole Foods that's across the street from a scrap yard!
I wish they would remove this ugly and stout parking garage or build a 10-20 story building on top of it. It seems like such a useless waste.
 

nomc

Active Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
153
Reaction score
212
I wish they would remove this ugly and stout parking garage or build a 10-20 story building on top of it. It seems like such a useless waste.
Too bad it isn't a city owned garage - does UPP own garages or just operate? If only there was an ambitious developer who wants to see if it's possible...
 

nomc

Active Member
Joined
Sep 3, 2020
Messages
153
Reaction score
212
Daymark condo development to bring extra amenities to West Bayside

Poorly written title.

"The Daymark condominium development aims to bring high-end features and extra amenities such as a pet wash, maker's space, sports and gaming room, fitness area and lounge to [the] West Bayside [building]."

There, fixed.

I didn't realize there are two commercial units (total 3400 sq ft):

"Tenants have not yet been secured for those spaces. [And might not ever]"

Fixed that one too.
 

Max

Active Member
Joined
Jun 20, 2006
Messages
395
Reaction score
271
Sheesh, this is more of an advertisement rather than an article. "Send our marketing one-pager to MaineBiz and ask if they'll reprint it!"

I agree that these commercial spaces will likely be hard to fill. These new condo projects have provided a lot of ground-floor retail which is only very slowly being filled in. I see that one space at 40 Free Street has been leased, and I read awhile back about some golf-focused sports bar was going to go into the ground floor of 25 High Street, which could be an interesting venture. I also saw that the windows of the commercial space at "Verdante" have been papered over, I wonder if they've found a tenant for that spot?
 

Top