761-793 Boylston Street | Back Bay

stefal

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Residences and night life don’t always peacefully coexist. Maybe this should be office instead of residential
Eh, it's about 23000 square feet of office, 19,000 square feet of residential across 9 units. Those units, based on their size, location, and the views they'll likely be getting just above the rooftops of the brownstones, won't be cheap, and I imagine the people that own these units won't really be bothered by the ground-level passerby's much. I'm sure they'll find 9 people willing to live, buy, or invest in the property.
 

BostonObserver

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It's the people leaving the restaurants late at night that will bother them. We’ve seen this issue repeatedly through out the city ie the north end.
 

kmp1284

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It's the people leaving the restaurants late at night that will bother them. We’ve seen this issue repeatedly through out the city ie the north end.
Residences over restaurants exist all over the city(and all over the world). What would make this project in particular so problematic?

Besides that, it’s going to be new construction with soundproofing likely as a serious consideration and I would expect that the residences would only occupy the top few floors.
 
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BostonObserver

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Because if you have ever attended a neighborhood meeting in Boston or read neighborhood news papers you would know this is a big deal. Many restaurants in Boston have had their hours restricted.
 

theSil

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I don’t think anyone’s ever credibly argued that the Back Bay’s nightlife is so wild that the neighborhood is unfit for residential.
 

kmp1284

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Because if you have ever attended a neighborhood meeting in Boston or read neighborhood news papers you would know this is a big deal. Many restaurants in Boston have had their hours restricted.
If I ever read neighborhood news or attended a neighborhood meeting I would know that a tiny percentage of the population makes it a big deal. In reality it isn’t and there are many people capable of sleeping through a little noise who are and would be perfectly happy living in an area with a high concentration of quality restaurants.

I don’t think anyone’s ever credibly argued that the Back Bay’s nightlife is so wild that the neighborhood is unfit for residential.
It’s an absurd contention. By their logic there are dozens of highly successful residential developments around the city that should not exist(or exist only as office space).
 
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whighlander

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Residences and night life don’t always peacefully coexist. Maybe this should be office instead of residential
BostonObserver -- It wouldn't be worth it for the developer to make a small amount of office space and then to try to rent it in the current climate -- anyone looking for office space has a wide variety of direct and subleases to chose from available all over the city
 

bbfen

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There are residences literally next door and across the street. ??
 

BostonObserver

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Not to beat a dead horse

Even though the acoustic music program worked for Boston, it wouldn’t in Cambridge because “we have a dense city where commercial and residential are often mixed, with a population that asks for silence – a lot of our residents ask for quiet,” she said. “And especially now in Covid times it’s even worse” because people are staying home to use their homes as offices.
from Cambridge Day Acoustic performances that work in Boston won't work here, License Commission says - Cambridge Day
 

kmp1284

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BostonObserver

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Why are you so hung up on this?

I honestly don’t know what your argument is here. Is it simply that restaurants and residential should never coexist in the same building or in close proximity; that restaurants should all be off in some exclusively commercial area?
I like to see restaurants open late at night but too often I’ve seen a lot of opposition and sometimes their hours rolldan back. I assume you’ve never lived in a city or attended a neighborhood meeting
 

kmp1284

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I like to see restaurants open late at night but too often I’ve seen a lot of opposition and sometimes their hours rolldan back. I assume you’ve never lived in a city or attended a neighborhood meeting

Boston, London and briefly New York but I still don’t see what your point is. Was I correct earlier in that you believe restaurants should not occupy space in residential areas or residential buildings?
 

BostonObserver

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no you are incorrect. I believe in neighborhood restaurants but I see Boylston st as the commercial and nightlife heart of the Back Bay And that means late night eating and drinking establishments.

Didn’t a restaurant recently close or threatened to close in the seaport because the building's tenant complaint about the late night noise?
 

kmp1284

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no you are incorrect. I believe in neighborhood restaurants but I see Boylston st as the commercial and nightlife heart of the Back Bay And that means late night eating and drinking establishments.

Didn’t a restaurant recently close or threatened to close in the seaport because the building's tenant complaint about the late night noise?
Not exactly.

 

BostonObserver

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Not exactly.

for those without a Globe subscription
“The residents [living above the restaurant] were going to do everything in their power to get us out of there,” he said. One tenant, he said, was filming guests as they left the building.
 

kmp1284

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for those without a Globe subscription
So you’re going to totally ignore that they were nine months behind on their rent, in default or about to be on a few million to other creditors(ultimately filing bankruptcy) and played host to multiple disturbances stemming from the unauthorized use of their restaurant as a nightclub/private event venue?

This was a one off situation with the tenant from hell and doesn’t justify your fear that these nine residences will pose a threat to the future of Boylston Street as a dining and drinking destination.
 

bigpicture7

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There are technologies available to make residential units virtually sound-proof these days.
 

BostonObserver

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So you’re going to totally ignore that they were nine months behind on their rent, in default or about to be on a few million to other creditors(ultimately filing bankruptcy) and played host to multiple disturbances stemming from the unauthorized use of their restaurant as a nightclub/private event venue?

This was a one off situation with the tenant from hell and doesn’t justify your fear that these nine residences will pose a threat to the future of Boylston Street as a dining and drinking destination.
Because that has nothing to do with what I was talking about. Nor do I fear these nine residences stop they hyperbole
 

stefal

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The PNF was supposed to be submitted late last week, should be up soon hopefully...
 

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