General Boston Discussion.

stefal

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It's a great step - now we've just got to expand it to all projects, since the change is limited to projects where 60%+ of units are income-restricted at or below 100% AMI. I don't see why not. Maybe incentive to do more affordable projects? Though lower housing costs across the board would alleviate the housing crisis regardless...
 

shmessy

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Absolutelly! Cities will not need so many garages and on street parking spaces as the A.I., work-from-home, GLX, expanded BRT, etc continues over the next several years. I still see many cities worldwide as banning individually owned vehicles around 2035. This is a move that will be gradual, however.

This new move is a "skate to the puck" action. Especially since the very first buildings affected by this still won't be occupied until at least 2024.
 

theSil

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Honestly pretty maddening that Boston City Council feels the need to slow walk such important reforms. You want to incentivize affordable housing development over market rate? Great. Find a way to do so without continuing to inflate everyone else's construction costs and subsidizing car ownership. The result might even be more naturally occurring affordability...

A city like Boston should be able to keep up with the likes of Buffalo.
 

stick n move

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Weve already got people clutching their pearls about loosening the parking requirements. Somehow this writer thinks less parking will kill real estate values for Bostons black/minority residents. If anything there needs to be less parking across the board for all developments, not just affordable housing, but its a start.

“The objective is to make housing more affordable for families with modest income. Unfortunately, the policy of cutting construction costs by reducing parking will damage the value of the property of homeowners in the area. Ironically, people with limited income might find it more difficult to solve their parking problem than the more affluent South End residents.”

“Roxbury can become the solid multicultural middle class neighborhood it once was. It is not good public policy to dump the Mass and Cass problem there nor to reduce street parking.”
https://www.baystatebanner.com/2022/01/05/a-solution-that-wont-help-bostons-housing-crisis/

- A better argument from them would have been that in order to facilitate less parking in Roxbury/Dorchester the Fairmount line needs to have a clear path forward towards high frequency service and electrification. More parking in cities is not the answer, but taking advantage of existing infrastructure to enhance transit access for low income areas is.
 

stefal

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Weve already got people clutching their pearls about loosening the parking requirements. Somehow this writer thinks less parking will kill real estate values for Bostons black/minority residents. If anything there needs to be less parking across the board for all developments, not just affordable housing, but its a start.

“The objective is to make housing more affordable for families with modest income. Unfortunately, the policy of cutting construction costs by reducing parking will damage the value of the property of homeowners in the area. Ironically, people with limited income might find it more difficult to solve their parking problem than the more affluent South End residents.”

“Roxbury can become the solid multicultural middle class neighborhood it once was. It is not good public policy to dump the Mass and Cass problem there nor to reduce street parking.”
https://www.baystatebanner.com/2022/01/05/a-solution-that-wont-help-bostons-housing-crisis/

- A better argument from them would have been that in order to facilitate less parking in Roxbury/Dorchester the Fairmount line needs to have a clear path forward towards high frequency service and electrification. More parking in cities is not the answer, but taking advantage of existing infrastructure to enhance transit access for low income areas is.
They don't cite any case studies to backup their claim that property values will drop if parking minimums are dropped. Affordable units are supposed to be affordable. Why are we concerned about high property values?
 

stick n move

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Does anyone have any pictures actually within the old west end? Ive only seen a couple aerials that never seen to show the whole neighborhood at once, but Ive never seen any actual pictures at street level. Do any exist? If not thats a trajedy.
 

statler

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stick n move

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This is kind of a tough site to navigate, but if you put in a few good key words ('West End' doesn't work well for some reason) you can get some great photos. Here is a search for "Scollay Square"


Example:
Thank you, its crazy how hard it is to find pictures of the old neighborhood. Its been damn near erased.
 

Charlie_mta

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Here's a good photo from inside the old West End, at the corner of Spring and Chambers Streets, which of course no longer exist. Photo from the GlobalBoston website. This does not look anything like a slum to me, It may have gotten a bit run down by the 1950s, but could have been rehabbed instead of carpet-bombed.

 
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stick n move

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I always wondered if it looked like south end buildings, north end, bulfinch triangle…etc and it definitely looks like a continuation of the building style from the bulfinch triangle. Damn what a loss. This would have been so vibrant today.
 

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