Kendal Square Residential

tocoto

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Sounds like two buildings. From the number of units I would guess one of the is at least 20 stories.
One of them


Housing comes to Kendall Square
Projects are starting to pop up in this center of tech, biotech
By Kimberly Blanton, Globe Staff | June 24, 2006

Developers are planning a 531-unit , $225 million residential building in Kendall Square, which would add to the burgeoning residential development underway in Cambridge's high-technology and biotech mecca.

The project is the latest in a handful of residential projects popping up in what is effectively the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's backyard. With its proximity to MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital, Kendall Square, a subway stop on the Red Line, has flourished as a commercial center for companies such as Akamai Technologies Inc., Biogen Idec Inc., and Novartis AG.

``We're the missing piece, the last piece of the buildout of Kendall Square," Fallon said. ``I consider it to be the finest residential site in East Cambridge," he said.

Kendall Square historically has offered few places to live but that is changing. The city said more than 1,200 apartments and condos exist or are in the planning stages.

The area is dotted with 5- and 10-story modern office buildings, some cutting edge, a far cry from the look in much of the rest of Cambridge, replete with 18th- and 19th-century homes and the historic Harvard University campus.

Kendall Square ``is sort of like a suburban office park in the middle of Cambridge," said David Clem, managing partner of Lyme Properties, a developer of biotech commercial and laboratory space and a 37-unit apartment there, Kendall Crossing. ``You're going to see substantial numbers of residences built over time."

Another residential project is across the street from the Equity-Extell project. Watermark Residences will officially open June 29, and 40 units on the lower floors of the 24-story tower are already occupied. Watermark has 321 luxury units with one, two, and three bedrooms and rents ranging from $2,000 to $5,000 a month, said Alex Twining, the New York developer of the $100 million project. It will include amenities such as a health club, concierge service, and parking in Genzyme's underground garage.

Twining plans a second, $70 million phase with 123 residences on 20 floors. He called his Watermark project part of the ``first wave" of residential housing in Kendall Square.

Down the road his firm plans to convert the rental apartments into condominiums. ``This is a long-term play," he said.

However, it's no sure bet that people will want to live there. Kendall Square has gained notoriety for its expanse of concrete paving and heavy rush-hour traffic. An estimated 30,000 people work within a five-minute walk of Kendall Square.

``When I get off the train, it reminds me of downtown Boston -- people bustling all over the place," said Cambridge resident Peggy Prebensen, an administrative assistant at the Middlesex County Courthouse, as she walked through Kendall Square on her commute to the subway.

``You don't think of it as a residential area," Prebensen said.

The Extell-Equity project will be completed in the summer of 2008, Extell's Fallon said. The project's architect is New York's Cetra/Ruddy.

The two-building project will have 292 rental apartments in one building and 239 condominiums in the other, with a one-acre, landscaped courtyard in between and retail space on the ground floor, he said.


Joseph F. Tulimieri, executive director of the Cambridge Redevelopment Authority, which oversees the development of Kendall Square, said the area is prime for residential development, and the city is trying to promote it.

He agreed that Kendall Square was conceived as a mixed-use development.

``Typically in a mixed-use development, the residential piece always comes at the end," he said.

Kimberly Blanton can be reached at blanton@globe.com.
 

LeTaureau

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Went the the Centra/Ruddy website and found the following renders. It looks like it will be lowrise only 8 stories at the highest point. But If I remember correctly, this is a large lot and I'm much more concerned with street level appearance. I like the streetwall and retail aspects of this project. Kendall needs more people to live there.

From the website:
"303 Third Street, located in Boston, Massachusetts (wrong!), is a new 605,000 square feet 8-story residential community. The project consists of over 290 rental and over 230 condominium units with an underground parking garage for over 530 cars designed around a one acre landscaped park. The sensitive urban design aspects of the project include highly articulated street elevations that use traditional Boston building materials (what?) in exciting modern vocabulary and carefully planned public and private outdoor activity for residents, retail establishments and visitors coming to the site."













 

Ron Newman

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I'm glad to see that empty lot finally developed. It has been an eyesore for decades. Now if we can only add some development around the DOT Transportation Building...
 

LeTaureau

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Ron Newman said:
I'm glad to see that empty lot finally developed. It has been an eyesore for decades. Now if we can only add some development around the DOT Transportation Building...
Yeah, those parking lots are never completely filled, and I never see people in the landscaped "parks". When was the Volpe Center built? It reeks of towers in the park aloofness.
 

ckb

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There is a group of MIT affiliates who have been searching for a place to build/aquire a number of residential units to form a "University Residential Community". The presumption is that there are a number of senior citizens affilated with MIT that would like to be able to live together and participate in the artistic and intellectual activites of the university.

http://web.mit.edu/ir/urc/index.html

Some more pictures if you click on "Presentation on 303 Third Street from May 2006 Meetings"
 

Ron Newman

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The Volpe Center was built in the 1960s and was originally intended to be occupied by NASA. If JFK had not been shot, you might be hearing "Cambridge, we have a problem."
 

briv

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This is just what Kendal Sq. needs more of. It needs to establish some kind of a fabric that elevates it from its current form; that being one of a massive, lifeless industrial park. Who knows? A decade from now Kendal Sq. may actually be a cool place to visit -- or live even.
 

LeTaureau

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Ron Newman said:
The Constellation Center will help a lot, if it's ever built. (Anyone know its current status?)
Good question. Do you think they were waiting for Watermark to be finished? The only thing I can see holding back Constellation Center is a problem with funding.
 

ckb

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Somewhere in those Constellation Center pages, they mention that they have raised about half of their $71 million dollar goal. The problem is that this is what they were claiming in 2002. Even if they are increasing their funding, construction costs continue to rise as well. They do, however, own the land. Like Mass Hort over on the Greenway, I don't know if this is a blessing or a curse. Seems like they both suffer from the lack of exposure on a regular basis to help drive donations ...

Anyway, this project is certainly a positive step for Kendall. Much work yet to be done.

And thanks for the info about the Volpe Center -- never knew the NASA connection!
 

garbribre

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Hm! I thought that WAS your home, and the place in North Beach was your hotel? :p :wink:

DTDave--back in Boston, MA, USA. Taking pictures in the gloom and fog (because it follows you everywhere you go, right? So stay away from the Bay Area then, eh. :) )

I always thought that a NASA logo remained on the building's front gate/entrance/sign into the 70s. I recall it anyway.
 

DowntownDave

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No joke. I left SF on May 3rd and haven't been back since! I'll be bring the fog right back at you next week, though... :)
 

Mike

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Kendall Sq.'s retail face set for a makeover

By Kristen Green, Globe Correspondent | July 15, 2006


Kendall Square offers everything a growing biotech company could want: nearby academic brainpower, convenient public transportation and plenty of sparkling new lab space.

Everything, that is, except for much in the way of lunch spots, and places to shop.

But that could soon change. Thousands of square feet of retail space is slated to house restaurants, pharmacies, dry cleaners, and even a grocery store.

Beyond offering conveniences to the thousands of workers in the area, the retail shops will also help complete the transformation of Kendall Square from an area devoid of street life to a neighborhood with an active, lively feel.

``We used to walk down the street and we wouldn't bump into anybody," said John McQuaid, senior real estate officer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ``It's drastically changed in the last five years."

But such is the continued shortage of basic eateries that ``you can't get in the door" at lunchtime at a Quiznos fast food shop that opened on Main Street in October, said Jeff Lockwood, who works at nearby Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research Inc. When he joined Novartis in 2003, Lockwood said, his lunch choices were ``zero at the time."

Now, developers are banking on the staying power of the life sciences industry and setting aside space for shops and cafes in virtually every new and remodeled building in the square.

More shops and restaurants are also planned for One Assembly Square, the only real retail presence in the neighborhood. David Clem, managing partner of Lyme Properties, acknowledges that the 42,000 square feet he has set aside for retail in three buildings may not immediately pay off. But, ``It's the right thing to do to create a neighborhood." Clem bets that as more condos and apartments are built, there will be even more demand for retail space in Kendall. He hopes to reveal the opening of a health club in one of his buildings this year and is in talks with Trader Joe's. A spokeswoman for Trader Joe's said it has no immediate plans for a supermarket.

Part of his motivation, Clem said, is tenants who have told him they want lab space in locations where there is more to do. ``They want a 24/7 environment," he said. He believes a theater complex scheduled to open in four years could be just the answer. The nonprofit Constellation Center is designing a four-theater, state-of-the-art complex on property Clem sold on Kendall Street. The group's president, Glenn KnicKrehm, predicted the theaters would draw up to 1.2 million customers a year. The $70 plus million theater will be located on a city block across the street from Genzyme Corp.'s headquarters, where MBTA access is convenient and parking options abundant.

The theaters, which will be able to accommodate 1,850 people, are designed to be in use almost around the clock for MIT lectures, biotech industry meetings, movies, and music and theater performances.

Lester Barber, Cambridge's director of land use and zoning, said developers have seized upon the area's potential. He said a restaurant is proposed at the Broad Institute on Main Street, space has been set aside for shops in a residential building on Ames Street, and retail space is proposed in a condo and apartment project planned on Third Street. And MIT is adding about 10,000 square feet for retail to two of its Technology Square buildings between Broadway and Main Street.

McQuaid said new labs and offices have brought more people to the area. ``There's just more demand," he said. ``People need services, they need places to eat, they need drugstores."

But Robert Beal, a partner in Beal Cos. of Boston, which bought One Kendall Square three months ago for $210.5 million, said the square still has a long way to go. He has hired architect Howard F. Elkus to reenergize the development, which includes the the Blue Room restaurant and the Kendall Square Cinema. ``You just need to create something that is going to attract people," he said.



Link
 

Ron Newman

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People certainly need drugstores. Letting Kendall Drug close, and be replaced by a totally useless Fidelity Investments office, was a very bad move. Why didn't they bring in CVS to replace Kendall Drug?
 
F

FastLane

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I am astounded by the pace of biotech-fueled construction going on in the Kendall Square area. Driving down Binney Street is truly odd -- one massive laboratory after another. Here are some pics I took on a bike ride this afternoon:

More Lyme Properties Buildings. These guys are everywhere :shock: (Genzyme Building and the Blackfan Research Center).

Broad Institute Building (recently completed)

Watermark Residences (now leasing)


I'm sure there are plenty of other buildings that I am forgetting...
 

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