MBTA Construction Projects

Brattle Loop

Active Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2020
Messages
876
Reaction score
1,443
I'll put my money on the 8th.
I like your reasoning :)

(Though, given the uniformly-terrible opponents, I wonder if there might be fewer fans than otherwise, which might push the timeline out a little. Then again the Devils have kinda been Bruins kryptonite recently.)
 

Brattle Loop

Active Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2020
Messages
876
Reaction score
1,443
The reopening of the Temple Place exit at Park Street sure isn't a priority - looking at December 2021 and September 2022, the extension cord hasn't even moved.
Any idea how far along the project is? For some reason I thought back in '21 that it was nearly done.
 

bigpicture7

Senior Member
Joined
May 5, 2016
Messages
2,837
Reaction score
4,533
It has arrived and is docked at the MIT dock in the Charles. I imagine it might be moved onto site/into place this weekend(?).
Your intel has been spot-on on this one stefal. Crane was working the installation this morning. Looks like it's in two halves (?) that are going to be joined upon installation.
(Please pardon the poor image quality; there was intense solar glare this morning when I snapped this, and the MBTA head house was in a dark shadow at the time).

kshh-in-2.jpg
 

Brattle Loop

Active Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2020
Messages
876
Reaction score
1,443
We haven’t had a hurricane since 1991. I think it’s safe to say that we can be taken off the hurricane map
Man, if only Carolina had been on the Bruins schedule image EGE posted upthread... 🙃

In all seriousness, though, I agree that we probably don't need to be considering (direct) hurricane impacts as a primary concern in designing structures here (storm surge, hurricane-induced or not, on the other hand...)
 

Teban54

New member
Joined
Nov 13, 2021
Messages
84
Reaction score
287
FYI, hurricane tracking is another hobby of mine, and I've been watching Tropical Storm Ian nonstop today.

Some model runs from a few days ago actually had it hitting New England and passing through Boston as a hurricane, after coming out of Florida and brushing the NC Outer Banks. Won't verify though, as forecast has changed a lot since then.

Funny we're having this conversation here...
 

WestMedford

New member
Joined
Nov 9, 2021
Messages
49
Reaction score
132
We haven’t had a hurricane since 1991. I think it’s safe to say that we can be taken off the hurricane map
No you have it backwards. No hurricane since 1991 (Bob) just means the likelihood of the next one here continues to increase. Since historical records (which isn’t that long in a statistical sense), New England has averaged one hurricane strength landfall per decade. Thirty-one years is quite the drought and when the next one hits will be truly devastating. Not even talking storm surge, just tree & foliage overgrowth alone will knock power out for weeks in a lot of places.
 

JeffDowntown

Senior Member
Joined
May 28, 2007
Messages
3,769
Reaction score
1,392
Folks, probability does not work the way either of you are suggesting. The drought of hurricane landfalls in New England neither raises nor lowers the year over year probability of a landfall.

A string of heads in a coin toss does not change the odds that in any given coin toss the odds remain 50/50 of heads or tails.
 

stick n move

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2009
Messages
8,753
Reaction score
5,859
Folks, probability does not work the way either of you are suggesting. The drought of hurricane landfalls in New England neither raises nor lowers the year over year probability of a landfall.

A string of heads in a coin toss does not change the odds that in any given coin toss the odds remain 50/50 of heads or tails.
It probably does increase though due to climate change.
 

Brattle Loop

Active Member
Joined
Apr 28, 2020
Messages
876
Reaction score
1,443
It probably does increase though due to climate change.
Yeah, it's entirely possible that the probability itself can change (and, specifically, increase) due to climate change. That's independent of any perceived "drought" (though it would make the drought continuing marginally less likely by the magnitude of the increase in hurricane probability). I think the point was less "probability is fixed" and more "probability isn't affected by superstitions that we're "due" for something".
 

Top