One Post Office Square Makeover and Expansion | Financial District

goody

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Curtain wall is going in and I am a little scared about the contrast between the transom glass and the balance of the curtain wall... its also more reflective than I would have thought. I am sure we shall soon see.
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stefal

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That's quite a contrast on the glass..

I was thinking the other day of how ridiculous this thing is gonna look halfway through construction.. There may be a small/short phase where the bottom half is buttoned up in a modern curtain wall while the top half remains with the older facade. On-lookers, passerbys, and tourists are gonna scratch their heads.
 

Jahvon09

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The frame doesn't look like it was sprayed with fire proofing. Will it be?
 

Stlin

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That's quite a contrast on the glass..

I was thinking the other day of how ridiculous this thing is gonna look halfway through construction.. There may be a small/short phase where the bottom half is buttoned up in a modern curtain wall while the top half remains with the older facade. On-lookers, passerbys, and tourists are gonna scratch their heads.
Might I remind you of the recent renovation of 375 Pearl in NYC? its the other way around, and is spectacularly half arsed - there's probably a reason a significant number of its tenants are city agencies. (at least compared to the original 2008 pre-Great Recession renders)
 

goody

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The frame doesn't look like it was sprayed with fire proofing. Will it be?
That is interesting, I would guess that they are getting their fire rating from enclosing with gyp board. I dont know the code off hand.
 

goody

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No idea, but I know the law firm Sullivan & Worcester was in the building pre-reno.
JLL, who owns the building, is also a tenant, and will be in place through the renovation. I have not heard of them landing any new leases yet.
 

whighlander

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JLL, who owns the building, is also a tenant, and will be in place through the renovation. I have not heard of them landing any new leases yet.
Goody -- its essentially 1 M sq ft of brand-new state-of-the-art [at least pre-Pandemic] Office space in the most desirable part of the Boston Traditional Financial District -- that's pretty good positioning [or it would have been if they had delivered it 3 months ago at least]
 

stick n move

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Glass is looking good. The red accents, the black recessed borders around the glass, and the silver lines all add subtle but high quality touches.

 
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TomOfBoston

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Seems odd they would start installing glass on the bottom before the upper floors demolition was completed. I may be in the minority but I thought the old facade looked fine.
I think the old façade was fine too. This is a colossal waste of money and materials.
 

meddlepal

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You guys are missing the point... the building owner could give a rats ass what it looks like on the exterior from the street.

This is about two (maybe three) things:

1. New tenants want open airy work environments with lots of natural sunlight. They're significantly increasing the window space and will probably pump the lease price up accordingly (Covid impact not considered).
2. Adding more square footage to the building by filling in gaps.

Finally, we have no idea what the lifetime was on the original facade but there may have been problems with it that necessitated replacement or it was simply reaching its life expectancy.
 

stefal

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You guys are missing the point... the building owner could give a rats ass what it looks like on the exterior from the street.

Finally, we have no idea what the lifetime was on the original facade but there may have been problems with it that necessitated replacement or it was simply reaching its life expectancy.
I presume operationally it will be more efficient as well. With a newer facade, water system, electrical, and HVAC system, they're trying for LEED V4 Gold, and long term will likely end up paying a bit less to run the building. I'm not experienced in large scale building rehab projects like this, but bringing an existing building up to LEED Gold seems significant (though perhaps they could've increased it further with less glazing)...
 

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