Raffles Boston (40 Trinity Place) | 426 Stuart Street | Back Bay

aycaramba

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NY Post article:

"Now, Raffles will bypass the major metropolises and luxury hotel scenes of Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and Miami to instead open its first North American location in Boston, the land of the Pilgrims and birthplace of Dunkin’ Donuts."
:rolleyes: keep it classy NY post
 

king_vibe

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"Now, Raffles will bypass the major metropolises and luxury hotel scenes of Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and Miami to instead open its first North American location in Boston, the land of the Pilgrims and birthplace of Dunkin’ Donuts."
:rolleyes: keep it classy NY post
The Post is written exclusively for Long Island psychos in sundown towns who only venture into the city to see Billy Joel at the Garden and cower at the sight of black people.
 

gac108

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"Now, Raffles will bypass the major metropolises and luxury hotel scenes of Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and Miami to instead open its first North American location in Boston, the land of the Pilgrims and birthplace of Dunkin’ Donuts."
:rolleyes: keep it classy NY post
That is the dumbest, most shallow article I've read in a long time. Jealous much?? Such a trash "newspaper"! As if Boston isn't a major American metropolis?! "Land of the Pilgrims and Dunkin Donuts" really?? Clearly written for low-IQ morons who have never left their dumpy backward suburban NY towns or borough of the city because "why would I leave here when I've got everything I need right here!" (as I've heard from numerous New Yorkers throughout my life). Their idea of an exotic getaway is going to Tampa or Cancun.
 

DAVE

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That is the dumbest, most shallow article I've read in a long time. Jealous much?? Such a trash "newspaper"! As if Boston isn't a major American metropolis?! "Land of the Pilgrims and Dunkin Donuts" really?? Clearly written for low-IQ morons who have never left their dumpy backward suburban NY towns or borough of the city because "why would I leave here when I've got everything I need right here!" (as I've heard from numerous New Yorkers throughout my life). Their idea of an exotic getaway is going to Tampa or Cancun.
I feel like its not that deep...
 

gac108

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I feel like its not that deep...
Yea it's not, I was just adding in my own opinions based on annoying interactions with New Yorkers in and around NYC. The last paragraph was what also irritated me, with "Boston has a reputation for being a bit salty and perhaps a bit mired down in its own history (there’s something about Happy Hours being illegal which still feels vaguely Puritan)", and while I am very much for bringing back Happy Hour- and hopefully it will in fact be brought back in the next year- the tone felt condescending, even if it did end on a humbling note, stating that even NYC doesn't have 2 Four Seasons, 2 Ritz's, and a Raffles. I stand by my assertion that NY needs to get over itself. Overrated.
 

Czervik.Construction

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You guys triggered easily?

I read it and although it starts off with some jabs (it is the NY Post after all), I thought it was very positive about the project and was very thorough and detailed. Real estate is the one area of the NY Post that is pretty well done.
 

xec

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You guys triggered easily?

I read it and although it starts off with some jabs (it is the NY Post after all), I thought it was very positive about the project and was very thorough and detailed. Real estate is the one area of the NY Post that is pretty well done.
Positive about the project but kind of negative about Boston. There's a "why put a fancy hotel there?" or "this is like putting brocade curtains on a garage window" undertone, so the project gets praised while the city gets dissed.
 

king_vibe

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You guys triggered easily?

I read it and although it starts off with some jabs (it is the NY Post after all), I thought it was very positive about the project and was very thorough and detailed. Real estate is the one area of the NY Post that is pretty well done.
lol we got a NY Post subscriber here
 

awood91

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That is the dumbest, most shallow article I've read in a long time. Jealous much?? Such a trash "newspaper"! As if Boston isn't a major American metropolis?! "Land of the Pilgrims and Dunkin Donuts" really?? Clearly written for low-IQ morons who have never left their dumpy backward suburban NY towns or borough of the city because "why would I leave here when I've got everything I need right here!" (as I've heard from numerous New Yorkers throughout my life). Their idea of an exotic getaway is going to Tampa or Cancun.
As a Boston-born NY-transplant I can confidently confirm that while Boston can be 'provincial' at times, NY can be insular as all hell.
 

Gunner02

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As a Boston-born NY-transplant I can confidently confirm that while Boston can be 'provincial' at times, NY can be insular as all hell.
I, also, go by that designation. Although, I have less desirable word for describing NYC. This is my second stint here, 2009-2016 and 2021-present, and I can assure everyone without a shadow of a doubt.. Boston and NYC are, and have been, on two completely opposite trajectories. I've never been more proud of what Boston forces itself to continue to be. While NYC builds upward, they have completely ignored everything below.

I've always loved height and I realize it is a fetish, now more than ever. I wouldn't trade what we are as a city, in Boston, for one neighborhood of NYC now.
 

gac108

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As a Boston-born NY-transplant I can confidently confirm that while Boston can be 'provincial' at times, NY can be insular as all hell.
I was born in upstate NY and moved around between that area and Mass as a kid, but I always knew my home was here in the Boston area and was never going to settle down anywhere in NY. I enjoy visiting NYC and have some family in the northern suburbs, so I am there often, but the entire layout of the suburban area of NYC is scattered, often very countrified, and extremely isolated from the city itself. I know physical geography plays a huge part in that, but nevertheless, getting in and out of the city is such a huge (and expensive! All those massive tolls!) hassle, no wonder so few suburbanites venture in nor city folks venture out. It has created this us-vs-them culture- not just between the city and its suburbs but also nearby cities like Boston and Philly- that is super unhealthy and unproductive. Maybe that isolationist/supremist attitude added to its character in the past, but in this ever-changing interdependent global society, that just won't bode well for its future. Boston's direct interconnection with its suburban area, easy (and mostly free!) highway access, vast commuter rail system (which is far better than NY's metronorth system, IMO), and interconnectedness to its neighboring cities (Worcester, Manchester, Providence etc), has created a culture in which people from the area all feel a part of the city. People from outside of NYC would never tell strangers while travelling that they're "from New York City" but always clarify by saying what part of the state, because NYC people have always quickly berated them if they ever DARED say they were "from NY". Anyone from anywhere near Boston would tell strangers when travelling that they are "from Boston" and no one would ever make them feel bad for doing so. That's a major cultural difference.
 
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Suffolk 83

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Maybe that isolationist/supremist attitude added to its character in the past, but in this ever-changing interdependent global society, that just won't bode well for its future.
Has American Exceptionalism ever been more apparent than in just about every New Yorker? There's some interesting articles these days about how American Exceptionalism is basically our biggest downfall so why would NYC be any less acute?
 

stick n move

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I was born in upstate NY and moved around between that area and Mass as a kid, but I always knew my home was here in the Boston area and was never going to settle down anywhere in NY. I enjoy visiting NYC and have some family in the northern suburbs, so I am there often, but the entire layout of the suburban area of NYC is scattered, often very countrified, and extremely isolated from the city itself. I know physical geography plays a huge part in that, but nevertheless, getting in and out of the city is such a huge (and expensive! All those massive tolls!) hassle, no wonder so few suburbanites venture in nor city folks venture out. It has created this us-vs-them culture- not just between the city and its suburbs but also nearby cities like Boston and Philly- that is super unhealthy and unproductive. Maybe that isolationist/supremist attitude added to its character in the past, but in this ever-changing interdependent global society, that just won't bode well for its future. Boston's direct interconnection with its suburban area, easy (and mostly free!) highway access, vast commuter rail system (which is far better than NY's metronorth system, IMO), and interconnectedness to its neighboring cities (Worcester, Manchester, Providence etc), has created a culture in which people from the area all feel a part of the city. People from outside of NYC would never tell strangers while travelling that they're "from New York City" but always clarify by saying what part of the state, because NYC people have always quickly berated them if they ever DARED say they were "from NY". Anyone from anywhere near Boston would tell strangers when travelling that they are "from Boston" and no one would ever make them feel bad for doing so. That's a major cultural difference.
This is very true Boston is seamlessly integrated with not only its suburbs, but its entire metro area and really most of new england. It really is the center of gravity of the whole region and you can really feel it even from very far away. From most new yorkers Ive known theres always a huge divide between nyc and “upstate” or everything outside nyc. I do get a lot of that same feeling from western ma though, but as far as central and eastern new england its all pretty well integrated.
 

TC_zoid

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If the writer of the Post article had only spent some time in the Seaport District and the M.I.T. area, with serious investigation, he would have come to a conclusion that Boston is soon to be the most important city in the world, or when considering and combining education and high-tech offerings (inseparable now). Many of the big key tech companies are creating a presence here with many of its highest level of workers (Amazon, Google, Boeing, Big Pharma). And Boston just hit No. 2, passing S.F. with the highest average rent cost (went up 4.2% last month), and will probably reach or pass NYC (the No. 1) sometime next year. That's a key metric to what is happening. I lived and worked in midtown the last five years and am now so happy to have left. Okay, yes, the East Village I will miss. But I sure won't with pile the garbage day, walking past and smelling that all too familiar Manhattan scene. And don't get me started on the subway.
 

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