Seaport Neighborhood - Infill and Discussion

jl326

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Let's not allow height fetishism to cloud sound judgment. I wandered Hudson Yards about a month back and, while interesting to look at, it's far more corporate and sterile than the Seaport. The Vessel is best viewed at a distance; up close it looks cheap and it's already filthy. The upmarket shopping mall is almost anachronistic, a throwback to when people with deep pockets would spend hours accumulating shopping bags from Needless Markup, etc...

Our 'stumps' are more interesting and engaged with the surroundings than Hudson Yard's supertalls.
Reason #37 on why I personally wouldn't want some tourist beacon in the Seaport.
 

stick n move

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I was thinking, what are the security considerations of the hudson yards site? They went above and beyond what was even reasonable at the new world trade center, but hudson yards is the 21st century world trade center just without the name.

The new wtc is lackluster and they definitely dropped the ball there, especially with the ve’d spire, hudson yards would absolutely be much more of a target in this day and age. Obviously we dont wanna live scared, and Imo the new wtc is too much, but since they still did all of that over there what did they do here? Probably since wtc security is above and beyond would even make something else more of a target also. Just wondering if they did all of that over at the wtc what security considerations went into what is in all but name the 21st century wtc.
 

Smartiro

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Apologies if this has been posted already:

Developer wants to turn Seaport warehouse site into office and research space.
An arm of the major downtown developer Millennium Partners on Monday told city officials that it wants to build 900,000 square feet of office and research space on the site of an old warehouse and truck parking lot on Northern Avenue.
https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2019/07/08/developer-wants-turn-seaport-warehouse-site-into-office-and-research-space/Yff95hapq4YXUkwrqdFMOO/story.html

 

SeamusMcFly

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Well. Millennium certainly likes working with Handel architects.
Need to get me some contacts over there.
 

stefal

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Its a shame the glass boxes took the most prominent spots on the edge of the Harbor. If they were building on those parcels today they'd likely be more interesting to look at and architecturally significant, perhaps with more height variation, like how we've seen with the past wave of Seaport buildings.
 

JeffDowntown

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Its a shame the glass boxes took the most prominent spots on the edge of the Harbor. If they were building on those parcels today they'd likely be more interesting to look at and architecturally significant, perhaps with more height variation, like how we've seen with the past wave of Seaport buildings.
I actually don't believe it would work that way, necessarily.

The parcels right on the water's edge don't need great architecture to sell. They have water views.

The parcels away from the water do need something more because they lack killer views. Hence better architecture as development has moved inland from the water.

Not guaranteed, but seems to be the general progression.
 

EdMc

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Outside of New York’s Hudson Yards, I wonder just how rare it is, in the 21st century, for an American city to have a neighborhood this new, this big. Amazingly good fortune for Boston.

According to Wikipedia, Boston’s Seaport spans 23 acres and 8.5 million square feet and New York City’s Hudson Yards covers 26.17 acres and has 25,800,000 square feet of Class A office space alone.

More specifically, wsdevelopment.com shows Seaport as having,

7,600,000 Square Feet Total

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3,200,000 Square Feet of Residential

2,800,000 Square Feet of Office/Research

450,000 Square Feet of Hotel Space

1,100,000 Square Feet of Retail

8.8 Acres of Public Open Space

The expanse of the neighborhood shown in the photos above is impressive.
 
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Suffolk 83

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The seaport is incredibly short sighted for this fact alone- you think air travel is going to be the same in 50 years? The buildings close to downtown anyway could've built structurally to add on later. Pretty sure nobody did
 

George_Apley

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The seaport is incredibly short sighted for this fact alone- you think air travel is going to be the same in 50 years? The buildings close to downtown anyway could've built structurally to add on later. Pretty sure nobody did
Assuming the Seaport is even there in 50 years... they'd probably just redevelop. Also what fundamental shift in air-travel are you envisioning happening by 2070? Hover take-offs and landings?
 

Suffolk 83

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Yes that's just one possibility, or people have their own drones they fly around in. You see airports and travel being exactly the same in 50 years?
 

JumboBuc

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The seaport is incredibly short sighted for this fact alone- you think air travel is going to be the same in 50 years? The buildings close to downtown anyway could've built structurally to add on later. Pretty sure nobody did
The fundamentals of air travel have really changed remarkably little in the last 50 years. For example, Boeing 737s and 747s were flying in 1969. They're still flying today, just updated versions of the same craft. Of all technologies, commercial air travel is one that has seen the fewest technological breakthroughs in the last half-century.

There's more software under the hood, but jets today fly just about the same as they did in the days of Apollo program. For example, modern commercial planes take-off and land pretty much identically to those of the past. There's little reason to believe any huge game-changing breakthrough is likely to come anywhere in the foreseeable future.
 

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