The Alcott (née Garden Garage Towers) | 35 Lomasney Way | West End

citydweller

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In the last photo at bottom left that load-bearing column arrangement where it switches to diagonal poles, well that doesn't look so reassuring, especially where the 2 wider slabs are supported by a much thinner pole
I had the same reaction. I'm sure, architecturally, its fine. It just looks so damn rickety to the casual observer.
 

whighlander

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In the last photo at bottom left that load-bearing column arrangement where it switches to diagonal poles, well that doesn't look so reassuring, especially where the 2 wider slabs are supported by a much thinner pole
Brad -- I'm sure that the computer doing the "finite element" mechanical analysis has given its vote of confidence to the complete configuration.
That's the modern way -- the integrated reinforced concrete structure is composed of many individual elements each optimized in a way which ordinary 2x style of construction with standard sized steel or wood pieces doesn't.

Consider one of the paradigms the The Ray and Maria Stata Center aka Building 32, 720,000-square-foot (67,000 m2) designed by Pritzker Prize-winning architect Frank Gehry & home of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Center at MIT




the butt of the famous joke --- What building on the MIT Campus is designed to withstand a 7.7 Magnitude Earthquake -- but looks as though it hasn't

Told to Frank Gehry on a tour some number of years after the building was completed -- it elicited a mild laugh :cool:
 

Czervik.Construction

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I was once in the Stata building for a meeting on the top floor in that silvery, pointy bit and it was like being inside a funhouse mirror. The walls were at weird angles, windows were really high as was the ceiling. It seemed like such a waste of space.
 
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citydweller

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view with caution: looking at that building (above) may stimulate an aneurysm
 
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whighlander

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I was once in the Stata building for a meeting on the top floor in that silvery, pointy bit and it was like being inside a funhouse mirror. The walls were at weird angles, windows were really high as was the ceiling. It seemed like such a waste of space.
Czervik -- the tour with Frank was really strange --the highlights were all sort of what happens when you connect a 3D printer to an EKG of someone in REM sleep
I did like the idea of actual blackboards to write on and some plywood walls amenable to attaching things semi-permanently without massive planning being required.

A couple of diverse inside views

this one is fairly standard


 

whighlander

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Boston -- great close-up work

I'm counting about 15 floors have already been or are in the process of being poured -- that's just about 1/3 of the height of the occupied floors
This is the kind of project which could be exempt [perhaps in a limited way] from the construction ban in Boston -- perhaps allow any work to proceed where there are no external permanent walls limiting "fresh air"
 

DAVE

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The shot with the last tenement is a powerful and surreal shot. Thanks Beeline!
 

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