The Hub on Causeway (née TD Garden Towers) | 80 Causeway Street | West End

Blackbird

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The Analex is to the right of the old North Station in thi photo. Actually it appears to be th einspiration for the new Verizon Building. Similar massing going on there.

I much prefer the old Analex Building. It had way more soul.

The buildings on the right side of this photo were all demolished, yes?
 

Charlie_mta

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The buildings on the right side of this photo were all demolished, yes?
Yes, for the original elevated Central Artery in the early 1950's, although the Analex Building wasn't demolished until the Big Dig project in the 90's.
 

Czervik.Construction

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There is a building in my neighborhood that is pure 5+1 fabulous wood construction, and anticipated alucobond. Looks like many others in my hood. I sighed with regret upon what could have been. Then, I saw them hand-laying a brick facade, with real bricks. Looks quite good.


Old-school hand-laid masonry facades are visually superior to the unitized cladding panels of today.
 

shmessy

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The Analex is to the right of the old North Station in thi photo. Actually it appears to be th einspiration for the new Verizon Building. Similar massing going on there.

I much prefer the old Analex Building. It had way more soul.

I vividly remember the Annalex. It was certainly not well maintained. The windows that were not already smashed out had huge air conditioning units protruding out.

Maybe the original architecture was charming, but by the 1980's that rat trap looked like post-war Berlin. The old Madison Hotel building on the other side of the Garden was a much greater loss.
 

atlantaden

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Would you expect any less from Delaware North?
Blame the Feds for blowing up the Madison in order to build the O'Neill. My aunt worked in the old Manger Hotel (later the Madison) restaurant kitchen, was a great treat for a small town boy from Bridgewater to visit his aunt in the hotel where we were treated like royalty from all the restaurant staff. They were the best, it it was a great loss when the building was demolished.


 
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nm88

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As I recall, an earlier concept (late 80s, different developer/architect?) proposed a structure that somewhat echoed the Manger/Madison. That idea seemed appropriate then, still does.
 

Charlie_mta

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I vividly remember the Annalex. It was certainly not well maintained. The windows that were not already smashed out had huge air conditioning units protruding out.

Maybe the original architecture was charming, but by the 1980's that rat trap looked like post-war Berlin. The old Madison Hotel building on the other side of the Garden was a much greater loss.
If restored, the Analex would have been a great building. It's a moot point anyway, because it was in the way of the BIg Dig project's realignment of the Central Artery through that area, so it had to be demolished no matter what.
 

Charlie_mta

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Blame the Feds for blowing up the Madison in order to build the O'Neill. My aunt worked in the old Manger Hotel (later the Madison) restaurant kitchen, was a great treat for a small town boy from Bridgewater to visit his aunt in the hotel where we were treated like royalty from all the restaurant staff. They were the best, it it was a great loss when the building was demolished.
They should have at least preserved all of the facade and incorporated it as the exterior of the office building.
 

Charlie_mta

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What was the name of the street in that photo, that would have wound up being under the Central Artery?
That's Haverhill Street, and it's still there. It was never under the old elevated Central Artery. Beverly Street was under it, though.
 

Charlie_mta

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Why was it torn down, then?
The Analex was torn down because the old elevated Central Artery was squeezed right up against it, which is the big reason the Analex was allowed to deteriorate. Who would want an office literally five feet from the travel lanes of a congested expressway? So, the new Central Artery built in the 1990's was quite a bit wider than the old one, plus the new on ramp from Storrow drive merged right there, so the Analex building had to go.
 

Blackbird

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The Analex was torn down because the old elevated Central Artery was squeezed right up against it, which is the big reason the Analex was allowed to deteriorate. Who would want an office literally five feet from the travel lanes of a congested expressway? So, the new Central Artery built in the 1990's was quite a bit wider than the old one, plus the new on ramp from Storrow drive merged right there, so the Analex building had to go.
No. I meant Haverhill Street.

It's not on the Greenway. Could it have been preserved even with the expressway looming over it?
 

DZH22

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No. I meant Haverhill Street.

It's not on the Greenway. Could it have been preserved even with the expressway looming over it?
Haverhill Street still exists. It's between The Avenir Apartments and The Victor.
 

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