Transit history/trivia quiz

Charlie_mta

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I scoured the net and found this aerial photo of the old elevated track layout at North Station, showing how the Atlantic Avenue El stub-ended at the raised platform alongside the Green Line at the GL North Station:

 

Brattle Loop

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The high platform at the east end of the old Green Line el station (at North Station) was the stub northern end of the Atlantic Avenue elevated line, which was part of what is today called the Orange Line. The elevated line began as a single stub track alongside this high platform at North Station (with pedestrian access to North Station), then shared the OL elevated line along Causeway Street, then branched off at Commercial Street, continuing on Atlantic Ave (as a double track elevated) to South Station, then continuing further south to tie back into the OL elevated mainline at Washington Street, about where the Mass Pike is now.
Fascinating, I hadn't even realized the shuttle platform had ever been there. Apparently the shuttle trains stopped on the far side of the platform (closer to North Station than the trolley in the video Riverside linked). Anyone know if there was a passageway below the shuttle platform, or did you have to go via that platform to get to the connector to the Garden?
 

Charlie_mta

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Fascinating, I hadn't even realized the shuttle platform had ever been there. Apparently the shuttle trains stopped on the far side of the platform (closer to North Station than the trolley in the video Riverside linked). Anyone know if there was a passageway below the shuttle platform, or did you have to go via that platform to get to the connector to the Garden?
I remember as a kid in the 1960s seeing the raised platform with the old abandoned single trackbed (for the stub end of the Atlantic Av el) alongside it between the platform and the North Station building. Everyone knew, and it was pretty obvious, that it used to be for the abandoned Atlantic Ave el line.
 

Riverside

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Amazing. Thank you guys, and especially @The EGE and @Charlie_mta for digging out the photos. I have some track diagrams (I believe from Tremont Street Subway: A Century of Public Service) that seem to suggest that in 1908 there was a shuttle platform in between the Main Line tracks -- something like this (with the platform in orange, on the curve -- there would've been a pair of crossovers just outside of the frame of this photo, I think):

1669333087477.png


So perhaps it was rebuilt once the Washington Street Subway was opened? Certainly the photos make very clear that the platform in question was for the shuttle.

Huh, this reminds me, I have a blog post about the Atlantic Ave El that I think is basically ready to go, I really should post that...
 

bigpicture7

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Amazing. Thank you guys, and especially @The EGE and @Charlie_mta for digging out the photos. I have some track diagrams (I believe from Tremont Street Subway: A Century of Public Service) that seem to suggest that in 1908 there was a shuttle platform in between the Main Line tracks -- something like this (with the platform in orange, on the curve -- there would've been a pair of crossovers just outside of the frame of this photo, I think):

View attachment 31044

So perhaps it was rebuilt once the Washington Street Subway was opened? Certainly the photos make very clear that the platform in question was for the shuttle.

Huh, this reminds me, I have a blog post about the Atlantic Ave El that I think is basically ready to go, I really should post that...
By the way, FWIW, the date of the above photo must have been within or very close to 1929, because the Garden (which opened in November 1928) is complete, yet the Hotel Manger (which opened September 1930 and is shown at left below) was immediately adjacent to the garden, yet it is not there in the above phot, though there appears to be the very beginnings of its steel framework in the lower left of the above photo



Above is linked from within: http://architalk-tlarson.blogspot.com/2013/03/revisiting-boston-garden-or-memories.html
...which happens to include a few other interesting vintage photos of the Garden/surroundings
 

reno

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Here's a view looking west along the shuttle platform, sometime between 1912 and 1928.

View attachment 31037
I like trying to read the ad posters in these pictures, on the right there is one for a Charlie Chaplin show at the Boston Theatre. I'm interested in the one at the end of the stub track, can anybody read it?
 

Riverside

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Today's blog post attempts to chronicle and illustrate the storied history of the Atlantic Avenue El's service patterns during a lively period from 1919 to 1924. As far as I can tell, BERy went through an extended period of constant experimentation, trying out what seems to be every possible service pattern along the Atlantic Ave El before (perhaps unhappily?) settling on a pattern that it maintained for several years in the 20s.

This post builds on my previous examination of "Aldgate Junctions"; I believe that the cause of BERy's struggles -- and ultimately the demise of the Atlantic Ave El itself -- can be traced to the decision not to rebuild Tower D (north of Dover station) as a three-way Aldgate Junction. BERy maintained the Aldgate Junction to the north at Tower C, but this asymmetry meant that they were stuck with the double whammy of reverse-branching to the south and the need for some degree of duplicative doubleback service -- an arrangement I argue was physically impossible to run efficiently.

This post was inspired by and draws heavily on the Wikipedia article on the Atlantic Avenue El's decline, which was carefully researched and curated by another member here at ArchBoston, who did the legwork of tracking down the original newspaper accounts detailing the endless service changes. I am in their debt; they did the hard work, I just tried to tell a story, draw some maps, and present some analysis.

Speaking of maps, here's a gif of the maps I drew for this post, inspired broadly by the spider map design of Cambridge Seven Associates:

BERY 1919-1924.gif
 

The EGE

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The MassDEP flickr stream is a treasure trove of old scanned slides. Here's a few, probably from the 1970s, to guess the locations of:
1669598711152.png


1669598770218.png


1669598947814.png


1669599014891.png
 

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Friend-Union

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I like trying to read the ad posters in these pictures, on the right there is one for a Charlie Chaplin show at the Boston Theatre. I'm interested in the one at the end of the stub track, can anybody read it?
THE NAVY'S STRENGTH IS ITS MEN. ENLIST AT ???? (partially blocked) I assume one could enlist at the next stop (Battery St. Station)

The Boston Theater poster for Charlie Chaplin's "A Dog's Life", is for his 1918 American comedy short silent film.
 

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