Broad Institute Expansion | 75 Ames Street | Cambridge - Kendall Sq

JohnAKeith

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Broad Institute in Cambridge seeking to expand
By Jillian Fennimore
Wicked Local Cambridge

A petition to expand Broad Institute into Kendall Square is one many city officials favor over the development of new housing in that district.

The proposal, already approved by the Planning Board on June 1, is one that would allow the institute to branch out its Cambridge Center life sciences location to an adjacent spot in the vicinity of Broadway, Main and Ames Streets and the site of the West parking garage ?also known as the MXD District.

If green-lighted by city councilors, the Broad proposal would trump plans already in the works for residential development in that area.

The developers of Boston Properties have asked the city for an additional 300,000 square feet of commercial development, an amendment to the current zoning ordinance to increase the total Gross Floor Area to 3,073,000 square feet for non-residential development, and an increase of space for offices and biotech manufacturing uses to 1,605,000 square feet. The height limit of the district is 230 feet, which is known to be the highest in Cambridge.

To ensure that housing can still be included in the Kendall Square vision, the Planning Board also approved a special permit for 200,000 square feet of residential development in an area to be determined.

During an Ordinance Committee meeting in May, possible alternate locations for housing included a space across Ames Street fronting the East garage, or rebuilding the MIT Coop to including housing on top.

On Monday, councilors noted that the proposal is still before the committee for further discussion. The next meeting is scheduled on June 9.

City Councilor Leland Cheung, who is a joint MIT/Harvard graduate student, said he has concern that developers have not discussed enough with the city, namely the Community Development Department, about mixed-use possibilities on the site. He hopes that ground floor retail proposed by Boston Properties would house something similar to a grocery store, convenience store, or ?foodstuffs boutique,? along with low-cost lab space, and an investment in public art displays.

?It?s about making the best out of the property,? he said Monday night.

The Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard was launched in 2004, located in three buildings at 7 Cambridge Center, 5 Cambridge Center and 320 Charles St., is a scientific community that specializes in genomic medicine research.
Copyright 2010 Cambridge Chronicle. Some rights reserved
 

Boston02124

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Re: Cambridge Developments

ames st- sorry for the crappy pixs
 
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PaulC

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Broad Institute - extension on 75 Ames St

Broad plans extension in Cambridge Center


The Broad Institute has begun planning for an extension on 75 Ames St., an open lot behind its central 7 Cambridge Center campus. In an e-mail addressed to members of the Broad community last Friday, Alan Fein, executive vice president and deputy director of the Broad Institute, said that three of Broad?s buildings ? located at 320 Charles St., 301 Binney St., and 5 Cambridge Center ? have leases which will expire in the next 3?4 years. According to the e-mail, the new building would serve to consolidate these existing buildings and would have more total space.

The e-mail invited members of the Broad community to three town hall meetings held March 7?8 with the architects of the new building to discuss ?what works in [the] current space, in terms of architecture and design, and what can be improved upon.?
http://tech.mit.edu/V131/N9/broad.html
 

PaulC

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This is a year old so it may have already been posted

More mixed emotions than mixed-use in proposal for Kendall Square

By MARC LEVY
Published: June 10, 2010

One option proposed by Boston Properties for housing in Kendall Square puts a 250-foot tower on Main Street. Five floors of retail and office space are at the tower?s base.
There was a complicated dance Wednesday as city councillors simultaneously hugged The Broad Institute and held Boston Properties at arm?s length for inspection, although the two are partners in proposing an 18-floor building for Kendall Square that can be done only with a change in Cambridge zoning laws.

Councillors at the Ordinance Committee meeting were effusive in telling the disease research institute?s deputy director and chief operating officer, Alan Fein, how much its presence was appreciated, but wary of giving the 300,000 square feet needed by developer without getting anything in return.

That could include such things as public art space, low-cost office and lab space for entrepreneurs or building housing that was part of a plan negotiated three years ago by Boston Properties.

It was that 200,000 square feet, or up to 186 units, of housing ? the fact that it didn?t get built, and whether it will get built now if the developer gets its additional space ? that provided much of the discussion, starting with an explanation of its disappearance by Boston Properties? senior vice president of development, Michael Cantalupa.

?It?s very market-driven,? Cantalupa said, describing how construction got under way during the economic downturn being referred to as The Great Recession. ?Were the market to not have changed beneath us on the order of two plus-or-minus years ago, then the housing that was contemplated by the special permit might actually be there. We were that close.?

The packet presented to councillors at the Ordinance Committee meeting showed three options for the housing:

a 23-story version on Ames Street, across from the institute, that incorporates part of a parking garage for a total 146,000 square feet or 249 feet in height;
a 24-story version on Broadway, atop the same garage, that is 182,700 square feet or 250 feet tall;
a 24-story mixed-use version on Main Street that includes two floors of retail (accessible from the street) and three floors of office space before residences begin. This building would be 194,000 square feet and rise 250 feet.
?That opportunity still exists irrespective of whether the 300,000 square feet is granted,? Cantalupa said. ?We?re hoping the economic conditions are there.?

Boston Properties owns the land under discussion for the housing and Broad expansion. All of it is in the 24-acre Cambridge Center, a complex of office buildings, hotels, retail and garages finished in the late 1980s after nearly a decade of construction.

Later Terrence Smith, director of government affairs at the city?s Chamber of Commerce, read a statement referring to the company?s ?commitment? to housing ? later confirmed to be implied rather than spelled out in a document. Expanding on the comments by Smith and Cantalupa, company Senior Vice President and Regional General Counsel Madeleine C. Timin explained:

?The current zoning doesn?t have any requirement for a specific time, and we?re not proposing to change that. You could have a specific commitment that has a time. Or you could just be committed as a concept, which is obviously demonstrated by the fact we pursued the special permit.?
Some city officials also seemed confident in Boston Properties? intentions. Roger Boothe, director of urban design for the Community Development Department, said, ?They wouldn?t have spent all that money designing it if they didn?t mean to build it. They just weren?t able to go ahead because of the economy. It happens a lot. We give a lot of special permits, and people don?t build if they can?t make money, if they can?t get financing.?

Councillors and residents, though, expressed wariness and recalled the sheer obstinacy of Kendall Square in becoming a neighborhood of mixed uses rather a collection of business buildings.

The complaints people make now about the square, after years of efforts to bring retail and housing, sound just like the analysis given a quarter-century ago in The New York Times by Fox Butterfield:

Some people worry that all this office construction is not being accompanied by the development of housing. Alfred Vellucci, an outspoken City Council member, contends the Cambridge Center complex, which originally was supposed to contain some housing, turns into ?a graveyard? at night. ?There?s not a creature stirring, not even a mouse,? he said.
?Certainly we?re in a down market now, but we weren?t always in this market. And we?ve been building Kendall Square for decades in up and down markets, and we haven?t seen housing come in. How have we continually not had housing?? Leland Cheung asked Boothe and fellow city planner Stuart Dash.

Cheung?s drive to see progress in the area ? he was frustrated earlier in the week by fellow councillors in his attempt to fast-track information from city officials for use in the Wednesday meeting ? was quickly mired in the minutiae of such slow-moving, massive projects. The momentum was rescued by councillor Ken Reeves, who, among musings about Kendall lacking ?a sense of place? despite years of developers? promises, boiled down the argument with vigorous simplicity:

?If you would like us to give you 300,000 square feet for free, what is it* you can give us that is a city amenity that would make all that giveaway worth it? This is with a sure understanding that to have Broad want to expand 300,000 square feet is a miracle; we should be on our knees ? but I also understand we have a Kendall Square that is just not happening. And in no danger of happening.?
The prodding came after Cheung?s request for low-cost space for entrepreneurs, to ensure ?the economic engine of Kendall Square? wasn?t priced out of the area, was brushed back by Cantalupa, who said ?market forces? would take care of the problem, and his attorney, James Rafferty, who said such subsidies raised practical issues such as how to ensure it was worthy firms getting the benefit.

?I?m very well aware there are a suite of logistical issues. I guess I?m looking to the developer to help me figure those out,? Cheung said. ?We can all talk about ?market forces will figure it out? as a good thing, but we haven?t accepted that as a rationale when we?re talking about low-income housing. I do think that this is an area where the community has decided the community needs to make an investment in supporting the small company, which will be the job leaders of tomorrow. It?s an investment for all of us.?

The Broad Institute expansion is proposed for Ames Street, next to its site at a corner of Ames and Main Street. Fein said there were five buildings housing institute workers now, some with extremely short-term leases, while its work force is growing by 20 percent a year. Another 150,000 square feet is needed just to replace the expiring leases, he said.

?We have to be in some other space in four years. If this doesn?t work out for some reason for another, we need the time to make other arrangements at some other location, hopefully consolidated,? Fein said. ?That?s why I?m here to support the petition.?

The institute and Boston Properties does not have a signed business agreement, though, as Cheung noted several times, and that makes approval of the zoning change for Broad a dicey proposition.

It needs to make sense ?no matter who is there,? Cheung said.
http://www.cambridgeday.com/2010/06...han-mixed-use-in-proposal-for-kendall-square/
 

PaulC

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Broad Institute extension approved

Early last week, the Broad Institute Board of Directors authorized plans to construct a Broad Institute extension. Alan Fein, executive vice president and deputy director of the Broad Institute, delivered the news in an email sent to the Broad community last Friday. According to the email, the Planning Board of the City of Cambridge approved the external appearance of the building on April 12. The transcript of the meeting is not yet available.

The extension will be built at 75 Ames St. in the empty lot behind the Broad Institute?s central 7 Cambridge Center campus. The extension would consolidate the functions of three existing Broad buildings ? located at 320 Charles St., 301 Binney St., and 5 Cambridge Center ? which have leases expiring in the next 3?4 years. The new building will have more total space than all of the buildings being replaced. An April 7 application to the Planning Board proposes 250,000 square feet of gross floor area at the 75 Ames building, including ground floor retail/restaurant space.

According to Fein?s email, tax-exempt bonds are on sale this week to finance the project.

?This project is a collaborative effort involving many Broadies and it is now becoming a reality,? wrote Fein.

?I thank all who have contributed to its success thus far, and look forward to sharing further updates in the coming months.?
http://tech.mit.edu/V131/N22/broad.html
 

whighlander

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Sunday on my way home from the MOS I stopped foe a walk around North Point Park\ and the Ef site

The construction area is currently used as staging for the Bridge (Barletta) and he contractor moving dirt for the landscaping of the North Point Park connections to the Bridge over the tracks

You can essentially circumnavigate the EF building site and see that the planned EF new building can play a useful role in blocking the close-up view of the Tobin Bridge connector ramps from the park. Frm reviewing the pages devoted to the overall footprint and landscaping --it looks as if the building's landscaping is being carefully integrated into the North Point Park landscaping.

After leaving the MOS area I drove past the 3 major construction projects near to MIT:

1) The Skansa site at 2nd & Bent (150 2nd Street) -- the last of the remains of the old building is gone and it looks like foundation work can start quite soon

2) 50 Biney St the surface prep is well underway

3) 610 Main St. -- parking lot surface is being removed

4) Novartis on MIT land -- nothing new that is obvious

Finally -- I came across a pdf which includes material recently presented to the Cambridge City Council related to the redevelopment of the Kendall sq. area as proposed by MIT's real estate investment operation MITIMCO

http://rwinters.com/council/091211.htm

excerpt from the Council agenda

TEXT OF COMMITTEE REPORTS
Committee Report #1
The Ordinance Committee held a public hearing on July 13, beginning at 5:08pm in the Sullivan Chamber. The purpose of the hearing was to consider a petition for a zoning amendment filed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to create a new Section 13.80 entitled PUD-5 District and amend the Zoning Map accordingly (Attachment A). The petition would rezone a 26-acre parcel in the Kendall Square area.



....The petitioners to present their petition.....Steven Marsh, Managing Director, Real Estate, MIT Investment Management Company; ....A copy of their computer/slide presentation is attached to this report (Attachment B).

Mr. Marsh began the presentation. He discussed the importance of innovation to our economic future, the global competition we face, Kendall Square as an ideal place for present and future innovation and the goals of the proposed Kendall Square development to create a destination gathering place, establish a vibrant gateway and connective link between MIT, the business district and the community and to provide space for both new innovative academic initiatives and commercial enterprises.

Mr. Owu described the process that his team has used in developing the proposal and obtaining input from stakeholders, neighbors and businesses in the area. They commissioned Prellwitz/Chilinski Associates to initiate an urban design study for the larger Kendall Square neighborhood; they engaged with Goody Clancy the consultant hired by the City to do a planning study of Central and Kendall Squares; they added urban retail leasing experts (CBRE/Grossman) and planners with expertise in development of the public realm.

Mr. Manfredi reviewed the urban planning goals. These goals include creating places that expand the public realm and become a "common ground," making better connections between community and commercial and academic land use, providing space for innovation tenants, contributing to an integrated mix of uses and establishing a prominent gateway to MIT. Mr. Grossman then described the goals and plans for increasing and activating the retail space. He described plans to significantly expand the retail frontage, created a two-sided retail experience for shoppers, increase the total retail to approximately 150,000 square feet (sf) on Main Street between Ames and One Broadway and approximately 260,000 sf total within a five minute walk, including 60,000 sf within the proposed plaza. Mr. Biederman then presented options for enhancing the public space, including careful analysis of the different groups of key users to tailor space options to their needs, for example movable seating, appropriate programming, etc. He also presented pictures of notable urban open spaces, such as Bryant Park in NYC.

Mr. Owu and Mr. Marsh described the technical aspects of the proposed zoning, including the creation of five zones with maximum heights ranging from 250 ft. along Main Street to 150 ft. along Memorial Drive, with a transitional height zone of 200 square ft. maximum heights allowed in between. The proposal calls for a total of 1,100,000 sf of new commercial development, including 120,000 sf of housing development and a reserve of 800,000 sf for future academic development.

Councillor Seidel then invited questions and comments from the members of the Ordinance Committee. Councillor Reeves stated that he would like to hear the CDD staff and the Goody/Clancy consultants talk about the amount of housing that is being proposed. He asked whether it is enough. Mr. Murphy responded that the Good/Clancy consultants are currently in the process of meeting with several stakeholders including MIT. They know the elements that are needed to make the area work and they are now looking at how the various entities fit into the overall picture. They are not yet at a stage to evaluate how a proposal for one part of the overall picture fits into total of all of the elements that must be there in the end. Councillor Reeves stated that Mr. Murphy's response did not assist in any way his ability to discern the adequacy of the proposal now before the City Council.

http://www2.cambridgema.gov/CityOfCambridge_Content/documents/Ord com MITKendall.pdf


NOTE; NIMBYs in Cambridge are now concerned about night as well as of course daytime shadows - at night it seem that elevated illuminated signs are now visible to people looking out of their windows -- this was in fact even part of the NIMBY-lite presentation by Robert Simha (retired MIT campus planner) and resident near to the proposed new development area -- I wonder if all the time that Prof. Simha was working on the MIT Campus that he ever noticed the word Prudential floating in the night sky?
 

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Volpe was originally NASA's Electronic Research Center. IIRC, a sop thrown to Boston after Boston lost out to Houston for the Manned Spacecraft Center.

Some of the work done at Volpe is related to transportation security. That aside, after Timothy McVeigh, lots of Federal buildings are now protected by setbacks and/or bollards.

If Volpe were to leave Cambridge, it would be to another part of the country. Palo Alto or Champaign Urbana, or Austin.

As for students interested in working at Volpe, these are the career fields:

[/LIST]
Stell -- you almost got the history right

Volpe was the NASA Electronics Research Center -- that is why the big amount of Cambridge that was leveled --- essentially all of where Cambridge Center is located plus the existing Volpe Site

had JFK lived and been re-elected the majority of the money which went to Houston and some of what went to JPL in Passadena and Ames in Palo Alto would have gone to Cambridge

Indeed because of the national mission critical nature of the work at the ERC -- much of what became to be called Silicon Valley would probably been located in Cambridge, Watertown, Waltham

the Johnson -- re-structuring of the Kennedy Administration took the money and poured it into Houston where Lyndon had a "business relationship" with George Brown (founder of Brown and Root and owner of the swamp land sold to NASA in Clear Lake -- aka "Houston we have a problem")

ERC hung on as a remnant (actually doing quite well) until Pres. Nixon rewarded John Volpe for being the first Secretary of Transportation -- Republican Members of the Mass and other New England Congressional and Senate delegations were instrumental in orchestrating the conversion of ERC to DOT rather than the closing and transfer of all the money to the rest of the country

from te NASA Histoy site:
http://history.nasa.gov/erc.html


Electronics Research Center
NASA's Electronics Research Center (ERC), was located in Cambridge, MA, across the street from MIT at Kendall Square (formerly Technology Square). The ERC opened in September 1964, taking over the administration of contracts, grants, and other NASA business in New England from the antecedent North Eastern Operations Office (created in July 1962), and closed in June 1970. It served to develop the space agency's in-house expertise in electronics during the Apollo era. A second key function was to serve as a graduate and post-graduate training center within the framework of a regional government-industry-university alliance. The ERC was just as important a NASA field center as the Langley Research Center or the Marshall Space Flight Center. By fiscal 1968, NASA planned for the ERC to be employing 1,600 professional and technical workers plus another 500 in administrative and support positions (Kelley, n.p.).

The location of the ERC allowed it to take advantage of the close proximity to MIT and (to a lesser extent) Harvard, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory, and the electronics industry located along Route 128. At the time, the technical, industrial, and commercial aspects of microelectronics were ascendant, especially in the Boston-Cambridge technopolis.

Research at the ERC was conducted in ten different laboratories: space guidance, systems, computers, instrumentation research, space optics, power conditioning and distribution, microwave radiation, electronics components, qualifications and standards, and control and information systems. Researchers investigated such areas as microwave and laser communications; the miniaturization and radiation resistance of electronic components; guidance and control systems; photovoltaic energy conversion; information display devices; instrumentation; and computers and data processing.

From the official history of the Volpe Center
http://www.volpe.dot.gov/about/history.html

History and John A. Volpe

The Volpe Center was established in 1970 to provide analytical, scientific, and engineering support to the newly established U.S. Department of Transportation. From the beginning, the Center was envisioned as a place where a broad range of skills could be focused on major issues that cut across the traditional modal structure of the transportation enterprise.

Housed on the campus of NASA's former Electronics Research Center, the Center opened as the Transportation Systems Center thanks to growing congressional awareness of the need to apply advanced technology to national transportation problems and the efforts of then-U.S. Secretary of Transportation John A. Volpe, as well as those of the Massachusetts congressional delegation. In 1990, the Center was renamed in John A. Volpe's honor.

In the three decades since the Volpe Center was established, we have addressed major national and international transportation issues related to safety, security, environment, mobility, and economic growth and trade. By applying our unique combination of technical knowledge and expertise, we work to improve the effectiveness, efficiency, and responsiveness of our clients in carrying out their missions to transport people and goods safely and efficiently...."

As it was the iconic phisiological monitors taped to the chests of the early astronauts, the monitors which measured and controlled the atmosphere in the capsules and suits were all developed at ERC Cambridge

Of course NASA also funded the developement of the Apollo Guidance Computer down the street at the Instrumentation Lab of MIT Prof. Draper -- now the eponymous Draper Lab

Volpe is noted among other things for: the metal detector arch at the airport; the traffic monitor / signal control loops in the road; and the technology enabling Fedex to track your package from Amazon.com's warehouse to your back porch

As an asside thanks to the bungling of the Mass Congressional delegation -- with the closing of the Air Force Lab (originally the Air Force Cambridge Reserch Lab) at Hanscom -- the Volpe Center, the Army Natick Soldier Center and the Institute for Soldieer Nanotechnology @ MIT are the last remnants of a once major Federal R&D presence in the Boston Area
 
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whighlander

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Renderings of the expansion of the Broad Institute, at Ames and Broadway.

http://www2.cambridgema.gov/cdd/cp/zng/specperm/sp257/sp_257_plans.pdf

I don't think a link to the renderings has been posted yet, apologies if it was.

250,000 sq ft, being built by Boston Properties. Special permit granted.
There are plenty of renderings in the pdf package

I particularly like:
the street level view for Ames St.
and the distant view from in front of the Stata Center looking up Vassar St.
 

whighlander

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That would be great. To be honest, I had no idea it was so improving so quickly. I knew that was the grand plan, but didn't know it was already happening. Either way, I still think this is a good build for the area. I believe it's about three blocks away from Kendall...right?
When you loo at the fringe of the MIT campus and the area around the Marriott and the T -- that it is the area where the planners think retil /restaurants will proliferate

In particular, the retail / restarurnt center is planned to be along Main St from near 3rd (Miccrosoft) back to Vassar (Google) and Ames St. starting at the MIT Campus and extending through to Broadway (Broad Institute).

Most of the other developments are far enough from this retail / restaurant nucleus to need some local shopping / eating so that people can walk to lunch not drive -- the newer projects seem to take this into account with about 4,000 to 6,000 sq ft for ground floor retail / restaurants
 

tmac9wr

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Re: Cambridge Developments

When you loo at the fringe of the MIT campus and the area around the Marriott and the T -- that it is the area where the planners think retil /restaurants will proliferate

In particular, the retail / restarurnt center is planned to be along Main St from near 3rd (Miccrosoft) back to Vassar (Google) and Ames St. starting at the MIT Campus and extending through to Broadway (Broad Institute).

Most of the other developments are far enough from this retail / restaurant nucleus to need some local shopping / eating so that people can walk to lunch not drive -- the newer projects seem to take this into account with about 4,000 to 6,000 sq ft for ground floor retail / restaurants
Nice! Thanks for the info.
 

datadyne007

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Re: Cambridge Developments

75 Ames will be a great addition because it straddles the Cambridge Center West Garage (77 Ames) on the front and even rises above it. It also will connect to Seven Cambridge Center (The Broad Institute).
 

JS38

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75 Ames

First image Ive seen for this project at this link - seems quite good!

McCall & Almy assist Broad Institute in expanding at Cambridge Center


Boston, MA According to McCall & Almy, the Broad Institute, a leading biomedical research institution, has solidified its plans to expand at Cambridge Center in Kendall Sq. McCall & Almy advised the Broad Institute in this complex transaction which entailed extensive negotiations with numerous stakeholders resulting in the Broad's long term control and expansion of its headquarters.

http://nerej.com/48593
 

stellarfun

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Re: 75 Ames

First image Ive seen for this project at this link - seems quite good!

McCall & Almy assist Broad Institute in expanding at Cambridge Center


Boston, MA According to McCall & Almy, the Broad Institute, a leading biomedical research institution, has solidified its plans to expand at Cambridge Center in Kendall Sq. McCall & Almy advised the Broad Institute in this complex transaction which entailed extensive negotiations with numerous stakeholders resulting in the Broad's long term control and expansion of its headquarters.

http://nerej.com/48593
Lots more renderings etc here.
http://www2.cambridgema.gov/cdd/cp/zng/specperm/sp257/sp_257_plans.pdf
 

BeeLine

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I noticed today that site prep has started at 75 Ames. It looks like they were excavating a utility trench on the north side of the garage. They have installed fencing and had a large stack of jersey barriers ready for placement. They have also taken the grey screening off the Ames side of the garage.
 

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From the recent Richard Barry Joyce report on Bio/Pharma/Science Lab real estate in the Boston Area

THE NEW CLASS OF BIOTECHNOLOGY-DRIVEN CONSTRUCTION
Currently underway construction, Office and Lab, all commenced in 2011

Project Area Developer Built for Size SF
1-11 Fan Pier Blvd Seaport The Fallon Company Vertex 550,000
15 Fan Pier Blvd Seaport The Fallon Company Vertex 550,000
610 Main Street East Cambridge MITIMCo Pfizer 230,000
17 Cambridge Center East Cambridge Boston Properties Biogen Idec 190,000
Binney Street East Cambridge Alexandria Real Estate Biogen Idec 305,000
150 Second Street East Cambridge Skanska Speculative 120,000
75 Ames Street* East Cambridge Boston Properties Broad Institute 250,000

*Construction scheduled to commence Q1’2012

Note Novartis' new project was not included in this survey
 

mdd

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Re: Cambridge Developments

First hand (seat) view of 75 Ames.

 

jass

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MOD: How about having the first post with renders of each project? I have no idea what 74 ames is.
 

datadyne007

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MOD: How about having the first post with renders of each project? I have no idea what 74 ames is.
75 Ames - expansion of the Broad Inst. It's been posted a couple times, most recently 1 or 2 pages back. It's a 12 (really 15) story building that rises in front of the CCWG and then goes right over it as it continues to soar upward.

Also, this thread is about general Cambridge developments, so putting stats for all the buildings in the OP would be difficult. I do think 75 Ames should have it's own thread though and I do agree that for individual building threads, the OP should list all the building's stats and renders.
 

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